Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Fourteen: Two Rhodas and a James–Part Two

Replica of meeting house, Clear Fork Baptist Church Cemetery, Monticello, Kentucky. Photo shared on Ancestry.com by Carlinbrooks 16 Feb 2013.

Replica of meeting house, Clear Fork Baptist Church Cemetery, Monticello, Kentucky. Photo shared on Ancestry.com by Carlinbrooks 16 Feb 2013.

In 1798, Rev. Isaac Denton, Jr. was the first preacher to enter this Transmontane Wilderness . He became a distinguished, prolific, pioneer preacher and leader in South Central Ky. and North Central Tenn. He established the first churches and first school in the frontier territory. He was Clear Fork Baptist Church’s founder and first pastor until his death in 1848. He ministered in Ky. and Tenn. for over 55 years. He and his 3 sons preached a total of about 175 years(1)

***

No, he wasn’t an orphan–but he was raised by another family!

Not only did I find the family who raised James W. Denton, but I also found his real family!

 

Thomas J. Denton (1781-1833) and Francis Boring (1790-1870)

James W. Denton was the oldest son of Thomas J. Denton.  Thomas was born in Tennessee in 1781, and he died in Cocke County in 1833. The known children of Thomas J. Denton and Frances Boring (1790-1870) follow:

  1. Joseph Jefferson Denton (1810-1887). Joseph was born March 10, 1810 in Washington County, Tennessee, and he died September 9, 1887 in Cocke County, Tennessee. His wife was Charity Huff (b. 1816). They had a daughter: Margaret Denton (1841-1920).
  2. William Addison Denton (b. 1812, Washington County, Tennessee). William died in Cocke County. His wife’s name was Mary (1820-1861). They had a daughter named Frances “Fannie” E. Denton (1861-1949), who married a Hux.  William last appears on the 1880 Census for Cocke County. He is buried in the A. J. Denton Family Cemetery.
  3. Temperance Francis Denton (1815-1878). Temperance was born in Washington County, Tennessee in 1815, and she died May 30, 1878 in Cooke County, Texas. She had two husbands: John Murrell, about whom nothing is known and Henry Jackson Click, Jr., by whom she had a daughter: Mary Jane Click. In 1870, Temperance appears on the Census for Perry County, Tennessee(2). This is a connection to Perry County that I had been seeking given the fact that Samuel and Daniel Spence and Milly Catherine Spence Jones had lived there prior to their departure for Missouri. Temperance appears on the Perry County census records for 1850 and 1860 in the Samuel Denton household. (I will get to Samuel momentarily).
  4. John B. Denton (1816-1901). John was born in November 1816 in Washington County, Tennessee, and he died in Cocke County in 1901. His wife was Mary Wilson (1828-1894). They had three children: (a) James Anderson Denton (1854-1929); (b) Frances M. Denton (b. 1856); and Thomas J. Denton. Nothing else is known about Thomas.
  5. Sarah A. Denton (1818-1892). Sarah was born February 20, 1818 in Cocke County, Tennessee, and she died December 20, 1892 in Giles County, Tennessee. Her husband was Calvin Allen (1813-1870). Their children were: (a) William A. Allen, born 1836; (b) George William Allen (b) George William Allen (1839-1908); (c) Temperance Allen, born 1842; (d) George Thomas Allen (1842-1916); (e) Morris Calvin Allen (1845-1910); (f) Hiram Allen, b. 1848; (g) Louisa Allen, b. 1852; (h) Houston Allen, born 1856; (i) Rufus J. Allen (1858-1917); (j) Martha Allen (1859-1896); (k) Lewis Allen (1862-1950); (l) John Morgan Allen (1865-1946).
  6. Louisa Denton (1830-1920). Louisa was probably by Thomas J. Denton’s second wife Elizabeth. He married her October 31, 1822 in Cocke County, Tennessee(3). His first wife, Francis Boring, was still alive, so they may have divorced. Louisa was born October 1, 1830 in Washington County, Tennessee, and she died January 23, 1920 in Cocke County, Tennessee. Her husband was Houston Sisk, whowas born in 1827. Their children were: (a) James Sisk, born 1866, and (b) Dora Madeline Sisk, born 1872.

One reason why James W. Denton would be raised by another family centers upon his mother’s health after his birth. She was only sixteen when he was born, and James was her first child. He would have been born in Washington County, Tennessee in 1806–the exact month and day of his birth is unknown. Enter the Rev. Isaac Denton!

 

Rev. Isaac Denton (1768-1848) and Martha Patsy Crouch (1772-1848)

Isaac Denton was born September 1768 in Orange County, North Carolina, and he died January 26, 1848 in Clinton County, Kentucky. His wife was Martha Patsy Crouch, who was born June 3, 1772 in Henry County, Virginia, and who died in Clinton County, Kentucky. They are buried in the Clear Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Clinton County, Kentucky.

Isaac Denton and Thomas J. Denton were related; their progenitors coming from New York. They both claim direct descent from Samuel Denton (1631-1713) and Mary Rock Smith (1640-1715) on the Denton line, and from William Odell (1634-1697) and Sara Vowels (1649-1697) on the Odell line.

Isaac Denton’s parents were Isaac Denton (1733-1797) and Ann Whitson (1733-1771), and his grandparents were Capt. Abraham John Denton II (1700-1774) and Mary Odell (1702-1774).  According to information submitted to Ancestry.com by rmsmith1971:

It is believed that Abraham, who was called “Captain” was a part of the militia used in defense of the settlers. He was also referred to as Doctor when living on his plantation in the Shenandoah Valley.

“Abraham, according to sources in Orange CO, NY, had some problems with local law and soon after left the county for a new home in the Shenandoah County of Virginia. This was in 1729 or 1730. Thus started the move westward, for his sons each moved in different directions into the frontier.”

Abraham’s will was written August 20, 1774 and probated September 27, 1774 in Shenandoah CO, VA. “in the County of Dunmore, Colony of Virginia, being very sick and weak in body but perfect mind and memory. First leaving my loving kind and true wife Mary Denton and William Reno Executors. I therefore will and bequesth my loving kind and true wife Mary Denton the lower part of my land and plantation during her lifetime also the legal thirds of the moveable estate. Also Ii give my well beloved son Abraham Denton my wearing clothes: two pr. boots, two coats, two vestcoats and one pr of breatches and as he has received his part of the land, I give unto him five pounds current money of Virginia to be paid to him out of my two daughters, Phebee Plumley and Martha Moore their parts of the moveable estate and the land after my wife Mary Decrees the tract of land to be equally divided between them both that is to say Phebe Plumley and Martha Moore.” Signed Abraham Denton, Senr. Witnesses: Mary Little, Dorothy (X) Clock, Elizabeth Smith, Mary Peerceson.

From The Tennessee Valley Historical Review: “Abraham Denton, Junior, became involved with the law in New York in about 1729-30. He, along with some close relatives, left that state and headed for Virginia, crossing the eastern part of Pennsylvania and the Northwestern part of Maryland. In the Valley of Virginia, then Orange County (later Augusta County) and the upper Virginia Valley, (Frederick, later Dunmore, and still later Shenandoah County) we find Abraham and his family. Also about the same time, Jonas Denton and others had reached the Virginia country. Samuel, Robert, James and John Denton begin to appear in the same general locality. The deeds in Frederick County clearly prove that the Dentons
were there as early as 1755 and became prominent citizens.”

Abraham left a deed dated August 12, 1774 which was signed by Mary Denton Little. Dorothy Clock (Clark) Elizabeth Smith and Mary Pareson (Pearson) made their marks. By this information, Mary Little was still living in 1774 and had enough education to sign her name. Abraham was a Captain in the French and Indian War in the Provincial Army
of 1766.

As the older generation died off, the younger ones became less rooted in the old lands and soon started departing for the southwest(4).

Isaac Denton Sr. was born in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, and he died in Washington County, Tennessee in May 1795. The following is from his Find-a-Grave Memorial:

Birth: 1733
Shenandoah County
Virginia, USA
Death: May, 1795
Washington County
Tennessee, USA

Son of Abraham John Denton and Mary Sarah O’Dell.
Married Ann Whitson about 1765.He is listed as DAR #A132656 for patriotic service during the Revolutionary War.Isaac left his will in Washington CO, TN, Will Book Vol. 1, p. 34, 35. dated July 14, 1794 which lists his beneficiaries as wife Anna and children Isaac, Jeremiah, Martha, Agnes and Elizabeth.Burial is unknown.Family links:
Parents:
Abraham John Denton (1700 – 1774)
Mary O’Dell Denton (1702 – 1774)Spouse:
Ann Whitson Denton (1745 – 1802)Children:
Isaac Denton (1768 – 1848)*
Agnes Denton Crouch (1770 – 1836)*Siblings:
Abraham Denton (1726 – 1827)*
Isaac Denton (1733 – 1795)
Phoebe Denton Plumlee (1737 – 1779)***Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling
Burial:
Unknown
Created by: treesandleaves
Record added: Apr 30, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 145845320(5)

The Rev. Isaac Denton was born in Orange County, North Carolina in September 1768, and he died January 26, 1848 in Clinton County, Kentucky. His wife was Martha Patsy Crouch (1772-1848). Their known children follow:

  1. Anna Denton (1804-1849). Anna was born September 14, 1804 in Cumberland, Kentucky, and she died September 29, 1849 in Moddyville, Kentucky. Her husband was Charles Reagan (1799-1879). Their daughter was Emeline Clemanza Reagan (1832-1862).
  2. Isaac Denton (1806-1893). Isaac was born December 23, 1806 in White County, Tennessee or in Clinton County, Kentucky, and he died August 23, 1893 in McMinnville, Warren, Tennessee. His first wife was Rutha Walling (1809-1840). Their children were: (a) Susannah Denton (1832-1833); (b) Emaline Denton (1834-1859); (c) Isaac Denton (1837-1866); (d) Ozias D. Denton (1838-1876); (e) George W. Denton (1840-1871). His second wife was Mary Polly Greer (1812-1883). Their children were: (a) Isaac Denton (1836)–he may be the Isaac Denton from the first marriage; (b) Sarah Ann Denton (1842-1860); (c) Ruthie Denton (1845-1873); (d) James Mordica Denton (1850-1911); (e) Joseph Evander Denton (1853-1854). I will list them here, but I do not know whether they are children of these two marriages, or foster children: (a) Phoebe Denton (1827-1855); (b) Martha Denton (1829-1855); (c) Nancy Denton (1830-1858); (d) James W. Denton (1835-1844)–he may have been named after James W. Denton–the subject matter here; (e) Shelby Walling (1844-1925)–she would have been from Ruth’s line but not her daughter; (f) Mary Denton (1847-1864).
  3. Tabitha Harriett Denton (1808-1858) Tabitha was born in 1808 in Gainesboro, Jackson, Tennessee, and she died in 1858 in Arkansas City, Arkansas. Her husband was William Proctor Welch, who was born in 1804. Their son was Turner Goodall Welch (1840-1915).
  4. George Nolan Denton (1809-1890). George was born January 31, 1809 in Clinton County, Kentucky, and he died December 27, 1890 in Lamar, Texas. His first wife was Martha “Patsey” Robinson (1808-1867). Their children were: (a) Isaac Robinson Denton (1830-1856); (b) John J. Denton, born 1838; (c) James A. Denton, born 1841; (d) Lucille Denton, born 1843; (e) George Alfred Denton (1846-1916); (f) Robert O. Denton, born 1848; (g) Cassan A. Denton, born 1849; (h) Charles R. Denton, born 1851; (i) Martha L. Denton. His second wife was Sarah Sallie R. Parrish (1806-1884).
  5. Rev. Joseph Crouch Denton (1811-1887). Joseph was born May 5, 1811 in Cumberland, Kentucky, and he died September 29, 1887 in Clinton, Kentucky. His wife was Mary “Polly” Long (1811-1901). Their children were: (a) Solloman L. Denton (1833-1836); (b) Elizabeth Denton, born 1836; (c) William L. Denton (1837-1908); (d) Samuel L. Denton (1842-1859); (e) Matilda L. Denton, born 1849; (f) Mary Denton, born 1850.
  6. Phoebe Denton, born 1811 in Kentucky
  7. Jeremiah Denton, born 1815 in Kentucky.

 

Another Cousin Connection: James W. Denton (1806-1860) and Samuel Denton (1801-1860)

Samuel Denton was born in White County, Tennessee in 1801, and he died in 1860 at Cedar Creek, Perry County, Tennessee. This is the primary Denton connection to Perry County, Tennessee. Samuel and James W. Denton would travel there together. On January 12, 1828, Samuel married Argent Coleman (1802-1860) at Cedar Creek, Perry County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) Nancy Denton (1823-1850); (b) Sarah Sally Denton (1832-1906); (c) John F. Denton (1833-1861); (d) Benjamin Franklin Denton (1833-1861); (e) Mary Elizabeth Denton (1839-1927). He was another distant cousin in the Denton-Odell line!

Samuel’s father was Benjamin Denton, Jr. who was born in 1733 in Granville, South Carolina and who died in 1848 in Tennessee. His mother was Margaret Peggy Ann Anderson (1774-1840). His grandparents were  Benjamin Denton, Sr. (1750-1810), who was born in Granville, North Carolina, and who died in 1810 in White County, Tennessee, and Priscilla Celia Rebecca Wiggins (1755-1808); his great grandparents were Samuel Denton, who was born in1 734 in Orange, New York and who died in 1811 in Pendleton District, South Carolina, and Margaret Moore (1714-1781). And his great-great grandparents were Capt. Abraham John Denton II and Mary Odell (1702-1774), who have already been discussed! These Dentons were all distant cousins!

I’ve already recounted some of James W. Denton’s activities in the Part One of this article. While he went to live with the Rev. Isaac Denton as an infant, he apparently maintained contact with his real family. In the end, he probably spent as much time with them as he did with the Isaac Denton family.

In July 1826, the Thomas J. Denton family was plagued with a partition action filed by Thomas’s brother, Samuel Denton (b. 1800), per the following newspaper notice:

State of Tennessee, Cocke County; May Sessions, 1826

Samuel Denton vs. Jonathan Denton, Jonas Denton, Thomas Denton and David Denton

PETITION FOR PARTITION

Samuel Denton filed his petition in open court, for partition of the lands therein described, and prays the court to make an order of publication, Wherefore, it is ordered that publication be made in the Knoxville Enquirer, three successive times, that he will present said petition at next term of this court, in order to have the prayer if the same granted, it appearing to the satisfaction of said Court that David Denton, one of the Defendants, resides in the State of Alabama.  W. GARRETT, July 12, 1826(6).

The partition action involved the division and settlement of lands in their father’s estate. By now, his distant cousin, Samuel Denton (1801-1860) had returned from Perry County, Tennessee for a short visit. Perry County had been recently established, per the following:

Perry County was formed in 1819 from parts of Humphreys and Hickman counties. It is named in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry  (1785–1819), American War of 1812 naval officer who, after his flagship was severely damaged, continued the fight from another ship and forced the surrender of the British fleet at the Battle of Lake Erie. Decatur County was formed from the portions of Perry County west of the Tennessee River. The first settlements in the county were along Toms Creek near the Tennessee River, with the first known birth in the area occurring in 1818. This is the first written date involving the area that would become Perry County, but it is evident that the area had some European permanent settlement prior to this. The seat of government and courts were originally located in a small town known as Harrisburg approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) south of the current seat of Linden. The county seat was transferred to its current location in Linden in 1848, where the current courthouse stands today. Harrisburg no longer exists as a municipal entity or recognized location(7).

James needed no further encouragement. He was looking for a place to go. The Rev. Isaac Denton family were fully settled in Kentucky and had been there for some time. He really didn’t want to go to Kentucky since he preferred Tennessee. So he returned to Perry County with his cousin, Samuel, and settled in with them for a short time. He met the Samuel Spence, Daniel Spence, Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones, and it wasn’t long before he relocated to Davidson County, where he met the Elisha Spence family. And as noted in Part One, he met two Rhodas in the family. The rest is history.

So what happened to the children of the two Rhodas?

The Children by Rhoda Louisa Spence

As noted above, James W. Denton married Rhoda Louisa Spence on May 10, 1831 in Davidson County, Tennessee(8). They were divorced in 1837 or 1838. Four children were born of the marriage: two boys and two girls. Rhoda kept the girls with her and James kept the boys with him. Rhoda married Michael D. Gill while James married Rhoda’s sister, Susan Rhoda Spence. The Gill family moved to Missouri while the Dentons remained in Williamson County, Tennessee. I covered the Gill family extensively in Part One, but I will present the information I have on the Dentons here.

  1. Thomas J. Denton (1832-1862). Thomas was born in 1832 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He died in combat at Murfreesboro December 31, 1862. Thomas appeared on the 1860 Census for Union, St. Francis, Arkansas(9). However, when the War broke out, he returned to Tennessee and joined the Confederate Army. His name appears on the U.S. Confederate Army Casualty Lists and Reports, 1861-1865(10). He was named for James Denton’s biological father.
  2. Elizabeth Jane Denton (1832-1911). I have no update, but will include her information. She was named Elizabeth for Rhoda Louisa’s sister who died in North Carolina and Jane for Rhoda’s stepmother. She was born January 24, 1832 in Williamson County, Tennessee. I stated in Part One that if these birth dates are correct, Elizabeth Jane and Thomas J. were twins. She married James Mattison Buckingham (1823-1904) on March 27, 1852 in Williamson County, Tennessee(11). They had one daughter: Milly A. Buckingham (1864-1938). The Buckinghams moved to Missouri with the Gills. They first settled in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. By 1900 they were in Benton, Newton County, Missouri.
  3. William H. Denton (1833-aft 1887). William was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1833, and he died after 1887 in Williamson County. On December 22, 1859, he married Sarah V. Boyd (1832-aft 1920) in Williamson County, Tennessee(12). They had a son whose name is not known. William also joined the Confederate Army. He served with the M. 2. Tennessee Cavalry. In 1864, William filed for divorce(13). They must have remarried because on November 22, 1920, Sophia filed for her widow’s pension(14). William was declared an invalid on August 17, 1887. I could find nothing further about him after that date.
  4. Milly Ann Denton (1833-bef 1860). Milly Ann was born March 16, 1833 (another set of twins if the birth dates are correct) and she died bef. 1860 in Clinton County, Kentucky. Apparently she didn’t want to move to Missouri. On October 14, 1852, she married Williamson Alexander in Dickson County, Tennessee(15). They may have eloped. Both of them do not appear on records for 1860. They may have moved to Clinton, Tennessee where a number of Milly’s Denton relatives and Williamson’s Alexander relatives were living. They may have died while traveling there, and they may have been the victims of foul play. The Dickson County marriage record plainly shows Milly’s name as Milly Ann Denton, but the recording notation on the side of the document identifies her as Milly Ann Dayton. I am inclined to believe the actual marriage license.

 

The Children of Susan Roden/Rhoda Spence

This is from the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee–the one and only record fort his family(16).

  1. Samuel Denton, born 1838 in Williamson County, Tennessee and he died before 1860 in Williamson County. He was named for Samuel Denton (1801-1860)–James’ cousin who lived in Perry County– and for Susan’s oldest brother–Samuel Perry Spence. Samuel may have died young. I could find nothing else about him.
  2. Isaac Denton (1841-bef. 1860). Isaac was named for James Denton’s benefactor–the Rev. Isaac Denton. I believe that he also died before 1860. I could find nothing else about him.
  3. Abner Denton (1845-bef 1860). Abner was a Spence and a Denton name. I could find nothing else about him and believe he also died before 1860.
  4. Susan Denton (1846-bef 1860). Named for her mother. I could find nothing else about her.
  5. James W. Denton, Jr. (1849-aft. 1880). James was named for his father. I could find nothing else about him.

So what happened to this family, including James and Susan?

James was a farmer and worked in agriculture. I have a feeling that James, Susan and all five of their children suffered the same fate as Michael D. Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence by being struck by an epidemic. I think they were all victims of some type catastrophe and died within a few days, weeks or months of each other.  According to the Tennessee Timeline on Rootsweb, a number of catastrophes took place in Tennessee during this timeframe:

June 1850 Cholera epidemic
Apr 29 1852 Earthquake- VA, NC, and TN
Aug 28-30 1852 TN river flood
1854 Cholera Epidemic (17)

The Timeline notes additionally:

The great Cholera epidemic was spread by immigrants from Europe. The major years were 1832, 1849, 1866, and 1873. By 1890, the disease was practically controlled. –Malaria was also of epidemic proportions in the late 1800’s. The hottest summer on record was 1886, and later 1887. Mosquitoes were out of control in the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys, as well as tributaries. This went on for years. –TB was also of epidemic proportions at the time. Children ages 5-15 rarely died from the “adult” epidemics, as this is a period of “Natural Immunity.” (18)

The Timeline further notes:

In case you ever wondered why a large number of your ancestors disappeared during a certain period in history, this might help. Epidemics have always had a great influence on people – and thus influencing, as well, the genealogists trying to trace them. Many cases of people disappearing from records can be traced to dying during an epidemic or moving away from the affected area. Some of the major epidemics in the United States are listed below: 

1850    Nationwide             Yellow Fever

1850 July 17    Gainesboro, TN             Cholera

1850-1    North America Influenza

1851 Coles Co., IL, The Great Plains, and Missouri   Cholera
1852 Nationwide [New Orleans-8,000 die in summer]Yellow Fever

1854 Tennessee, Giles County              unknown epidemic

1855    Nationwide [many parts] Yellow Fever

1857-9 Worldwide [one of the greatest epidemics]  Influenza

1860-1    Pennsylvania  Smallpox

1862     Tennessee, Shelby County, Memphis Yellow-fever(19)

***

Thus completes the story of Elisha Spence and Susanna Spencer and the lives of their children and some of their grandchildren and other descendants.

I have one more article to write in this series which will focus on Elisha’s second marriage to Jane Bell. There were four children of that marriage. My information is limited, so they will be covered in the last article. Then I will write a Conclusion and move on from there.

 

References

(1) Rev. Isaac Denton, Jr. Gravestone Inscription, Clear Fork Baptist Church Cemetery, Monticello, Kentucky. Find-a-Grave.com. Shared by Carlinbrooks 16 Feb 2013 on Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) 1870 Census for Perry County, Tennessee for Temperance Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Thomas J. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Information about Capt. Abraham Denton, Jr., submitted by rmsmith1971 10 Jul 2012, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Isaac Denton Find-a-Grave Memorial No. 145845320. Index at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) Samuel Denton Partition Action, May-July 1826 from the Knoxville, Gazette. Posted on Ancestry.com by Lucinda Copeland 10 Jun 2014. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) “Perry County, Tennessee” From the Wikipedia Site. Modified  29 Aug 2015. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_County,_Tennessee

(8) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James Denton and Rhoda Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) 1860 Census for Union, St. Francis, Arkansas showing Thomas J. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) U.S. Confederate Army Casualty Lists and Reports, 1861-1865 for Thomas J. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James Mattison Buckingham and Elizabeth Jane Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) Tennessee State Marriage Records for William H. Denton and Sophia V. Boyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) Tennessee Divorce and Other Records, 1800-1965 about William H. Denton and Sophia V. Boyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 about William H. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Tennessee Divorce and Other Records, 1800-1965 about Williamson Alexander and Milly Ann Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) 1850 Census for the James W. Denton Family, Williamson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(17) Historic Timeline of Tennessee. Rootsweb.com Website. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnmcmin2/tennesseetimeline.html

(19) Historic Timeline of Tennessee. Rootsweb.com Website. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnmcmin2/tennesseetimeline.html

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Thirteen: Two Rhodas and a James–Part One

 

 

Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Taken May 2001

Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Taken May 2001

 

 

He must have been a wonder!

That’s what I thought while sorting through the James W. Denton-Rhoda Louisa Spence-Susan Roden/Rhoda Spence Triangle!  Fortunately, the situation did not turn out what it originally promised to be. Perhaps discovering two sisters bearing the name of Rhoda sparked his initial interest.

Rhoda Louisa Spence and Susan Rhoda Spence were the youngest daughters of Elisha Spence and Susanna. Rhoda Louisa was the twin of William Spence of Weakley County. As noted in the previous article, the twins were born in Randolph County, North Carolina or in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina March 28, 1809. Some people think they were born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. That is a possibility since Elisha Spence moved around quite a bit. Then in early 1810, the family set out for Davidson County, Tennessee, where Susan was born in late September. In 1830, the Elisha Spence family still resided in Davidson County, but by the early 1830s, they moved to the western part of the state. The older children were still living in Perry County; Levi returned from North Carolina and settled in Madison County. Elisha moved his family to Madison.

By 1830, however, Rhoda Louisa and Susan Rhoda were on their own and both had their eyes set on marriage.

Enter one James W. Denton who had an eye for the young Rhodas.

According to the one and only census record I located for him, he was born in Tennessee in 1806(1). I have no idea where he originated or who his parents were. A number of Denton families resided in the area, but James doesn’t appear to match any of them. A James W. Denton died in 1861 in Smith County, Tennessee(2), but that individual appears to have been born about 1846. Another James W. Denton married a Sophia Shaw in Williamson County in 1829(3), but he wasn’t this James W. Denton. That James W. Denton remained married to Sophia. And then there was another James W. Denton in Maury County who married there and raised a family. He died in 1880 at the age of 85(4). He was not this James W. Denton either! And there was a large family of Dentons in Perry County, Tennessee. I could not find a link there either, however. He may have come from Eastern Tennessee since a large group of Dentons resided there as well.

Several things may have happened to James. He may have struck out on his own at an early age. He may have been orphaned.  And there is the possibility that James W. Denton was not his real name!

At any rate, with the Elisha Spence family moving to Madison County, Tennessee and the two Rhodas remaining in Williamson County, James had free reign of the situation. According to Tennessee Marriage Records, on May 10, 1831, James W. Denton married Rhoda Spence in Davidson County, Tennessee(5). The question is this: Which Rhoda?

 

Rhoda Louisa Spence (1809-1860)

Rhoda Louisa Spence and James W. Denton were married in Davidson County, Tennessee May 10, 1831. Their children were:

  1. Thomas J. Denton (1832-aft 1860). Thomas was born in Williamson County, Tennessee on January 21, 1832 (a twin), and he died after 1860. He may be the Thomas J. Spence who appears on the 1860 Census for Arkansas in Union Twp., St. Francis, Arkansas.
  2. Elizabeth Jane Denton (1832-1911). Elizabeth was born January 21, 1832 in Williamson County, Tennessee. Elizabeth and Thomas J. were twins if the dates are correct. She died in Newton County, Missouri September 6, 1911. On March 27, 1852, she married James Mattison Buckingham in Williamson County, Tennessee. Their daughter was Milly A. Buckingham (1864-1938).
  3. Milly Ann Denton (1833-1850). Milly was born about 1833 in Williamson County, Tennessee. She last appears on the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee. She may be the Milly Ann Denton who married Williamson Alexander in Dickson County, Tennessee on October 14, 1852(7)
  4. William Denton (1833-1850). William was born about 1833 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He last appears on the 1850 Williamson County, Tennessee Census in the James W Denton household(8).

James and Rhoda Louisa began experiencing difficulties in their marriage, and I don’t know exactly when those difficulties started. They probably erupted after Rhoda’s  family moved to Western Tennessee and after Susan started spending a great deal of time at Rhoda’s house. One thing led to another, ending in a divorce between James and Rhoda. I haven’t found an exact date for the divorce, but she married Michael D. Gill November 27, 1838–the same year when Susan married James W. Denton! So the divorce would have been about 1836 or 1837. There were four children from her marriage to James Denton: two girls and two boys. Rhoda kept the girls while James kept the boys–hence the Denton surname.  Elizabeth Jane and Milly Ann were raised by Michael D. Gill, and they took the Gill name: Elizabeth Jane Denton Gill and Milly Ann Denton Gill.

Michael David Gill was born about 1800 in Louisa County, Virginia, and he died around 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri. He was the son of Mitchell Gill (1772-1810) of Charlotte County, Virginia and Nancy Dabbs (1774-1809) and the grandson of Michael Gill (1730-1801). Michael’s brother was Mitchell Gill (1803-1880). Mitchell was born February 5, 1803 in Charlotte County, Virginia, and he died March 6, 1880 in Richland, Keokuk County, Iowa. His wife was Catharine Thompson (1796-1880). Their children were:

  1. James Gill (1835-1906)
  2. Susan Gill (b. 1840)
  3. Ellen Gill (b. 1842)
  4. Sarah Gill (b. 1847)
  5. Louisa Gill (b. 1848)
  6. Lydia Annis Gill (1850-1916)

Mitchell may have gone to Tennessee with his brother Michael, but he was in Indiana by 1835. Catherine was probably his second wife. They were married June 4, 1846 in Keokuk, Iowa. The last three children listed above would have been theirs. The first three would have been by a first wife.

Michael David Gill appears on early census records as follows:  the 1820 Census for Charlotte County, Virginia(9), the 1830 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee(10), the 1840 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee(11), the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee(12), and Missouri Land Records for 1856, 1857, and 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri(13), (14), (15). The Michael D. Gill family were in Jasper County by March 10, 1856 when he obtained his first warrant for land. In all likelihood, they were in the county earlier.

The children of Michael David Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence follow:

  1. Samuel S. Gill (1842-1880).  Samuel was born in January 1842 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died May 28, 1880 in Savoy, Fannin County, Texas. Samuel served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. His military file is quite substantial.  He enlisted at Camp Cedar July 21, 1862 for a term of three years. He fought in the Battle of Helena, Arkansas July 28, 1863 in which he was slightly wounded. His name appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War of Cos. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and K, 11th Missouri Infantry of the Confederate Army, commanded by Major James Phillips, surrendered at New Orleans. Louisiana by Gen. E. K. Smith, C.S.A., to Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby, USA May 26, 1865; paroled June 8, 1865 at Shreveport, Louisiana(16).  Samuel went to Texas after his release, where he married Emma Louis Brooks (1850-1880) on December 20, 1868 in Fannin County, Texas. Their children were: (a)  William M. Gill, born December, 1869 in Fannin County, Texas; and (b) Maude Gill (1873-1962). William was born about December 1869 in Fannin County, Texas. I have no additional information about him. Maude was born December 24, 1873 in Savoy, Fannin County, Texas, and she died November 30, 1962 in McKinney, Collin, Texas. On November 29, 1898, Maude became the second wife of George Clinton Masters (1861-1942). George’s biography from Find-a-Grave follows:

 

Birth: Sep. 6, 1861
Death: Jun. 20, 1942

born DeKalb County, AL
died Denton, Denton County, TX  From Penne Magnusson Cartright Hannum, rec’d 19 Apr 2015
Clint traveled extensively and was an early day advocate of the motor home and travel trailer. He came to Texas in 1880, worked at various occupations for a few years until he settled in Denton where he became a traveling salesman. He made many trips back to Alabama to visit relatives and entertained everyone with his stories of adventure.Family links:
Parents:
Benjamin Franklin Masters (1833 – 1886)
Nancy Elizabeth Kay Masters (1837 – 1917)Spouses:
Margaret ‘Maggie’ Keith Masters (1869 – 1895)
Maude Gill Masters (1873 – 1962)Children:
Emma Alberta Masters Giddens (1899 – 1998)*
Gill C. Masters (1916 – 1980)*Siblings:
Silas Pickens Masters (1854 – 1868)*
Nuton Jasper Masters (1855 – 1860)*
Robert M. Masters (1858 – 1858)*
John F. Masters (1859 – 1861)*
George Clinton Masters (1861 – 1942)
Ira N. Masters (1863 – 1886)*
Lura Jane Masters Totherow (1865 – 1891)*
Ida Lee Masters Green (1867 – 1917)*
Luther Morgan Masters (1869 – 1943)*
Marcus Lee Masters (1871 – 1959)*
William Addison Masters (1873 – 1942)*
Joseph A Masters (1876 – 1923)*
Ella Jane Masters Upton (1879 – 1972)*
Sidney Wyot Masters (1880 – 1972)**Calculated relationshipInscription:
FatherNote: h/o 1) Margaret ‘Maggie’ Keith and 2) Maude Gill
Burial:
Odd Fellows Cemetery
Denton
Denton County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section A
Created by: RMLeahy
Record added: Jun 13, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14599940 (17)

Note: The two children listed on the Find-a-Grave Entry are the children of George Clinton Masters and Maude Gill: Emma A. Masters Giddens (1899-1998) and Gill Clinton Masters, Sr. (1916-1980).

Samuel S. Gill is believed to be buried in the Greenwood Cemetery, per the following account:

I believe Samuel Gill is buried here.  The find a grave website details that the west side of this cemetery was devoted to victims of the May 1880, Savoy Tornado. The wooden markers were later destroyed by a grass fire in 1935. So we will never know for sure (18).

Samuel Gill apparently died in the 1880 Savoy tornado!

2.  Daniel David Gill (1844-1920).  Daniel was born February 15, 1844 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died October 29, 1920 in Jane, McDonald, Missouri. Daniel also served in the Confederate Army. He was also in Company A, 11th Missouri Infantry, CSA and enlisted August 10, 1862 at Coon Creek, Missouri under Col. Hunter for three years. He appears to have survived the war unscathed. Unlike his brother, Samuel, he returned to Jasper County, Missouri, where he married Lavesta Ann Roy (b. 1847) in Jasper County. They had one child: Mary Gill (b. 1870). The Gills resided in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri in 1870(19), in Marion, Newton County Missouri in 1880(20), and in Jane, McDonald County, Missouri in 1900(21).  Daniel David Gill died in Jane; he and his wife are buried in the cemetery there. His wife’s name is engraved on the tombstone, but there is no date of death for her.

3. Isaac Ivy Gill (1847-1922). Isaac was born November 24, 1847 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died July 27, 1922 in Jane, McDonald County, Missouri. His middle initial is registered as “A” on his tombstone. I remember reading one descendant’s account that the tombstone carver misunderstood the pronunciation of the middle initial: “Ah” vs. “I”– something related to the southern pronunciation. So the “A” was put on his tombstone. His middle name really was “Ivy.” Isaac was too young for the Civil War.  On January 31, 1875, he married Texanna Triplett (18 in Jasper County, Missouri. She was the daughter of Layton C. Triplett (b. 1832) and Nancy E. Hansford (b. 1834), the niece of George Washington Triplett (1825-1909), who married Rebecca Jane Spence (1828-1859)–daughter of Samuel Perry Spence and Elizabeth Inman [my third great grandparents]– and the granddaughter of John Hore Triplett (1804-1882) and Mary Butler Bradley (1807-1875). Their children were: (a) Daniel Laton Gill (1878-1935); (b) William Franklin Gill (1887-1970)–I have a feeling he was named after my grandfather, William Franklin Spence (1884-1973); (c) Isaac Newt Gill (1898-1952). The Gills resided in Marion, Newton County, Missouri in 1880(22), in Benton Twp., Newton County, Missouri in 1900(23), in Bentonville Ward 3, Newton County, Missouri in 1910(24) and finally in White Rock, McDonald, Missouri in 1920(25).

As noted previously, Rhoda’s daughter by James W. Denton–Elizabeth Jane Denton Blankenship (1832-1911)–resided in Newton County with her family. In 1860, they were in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri.

I should mention here that there was another Louisa Gill who relocated from New York to Jasper County and who settled in Carthage. She was the mother-in-law of A.M. Drake–a noted figure in Jasper County history, and she died in October 1871 in Jasper County. That Louisa Gill was not this one. That Louisa Gill came from New York and descended from a New Hampshire line of Gills who fought in the Revolutionary War. Her maiden name was Gill and not Spence.

So what happened to Michael D. Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence?

Michael and Rhoda last appear together on the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee as follows:

Michael D. Gill, age 50, born Virginia–Occupation: Shoemaker

Rhoda Gill, age 42, born North Carolina

Elizabeth J. Gill, age 18, born Tennessee

Milly A Gill, age 17, born Tennessee

Samuel Gill, age 8, born Tennessee

Daniel D. Gill, age 6, born Tennessee

Isaac I. Gill, age 3, born Tennessee(26)

Michael D. Gill last appears on the 1860 Land Warrant (dated August 1, 1860) mentioned previously. Neither Michael nor Rhoda appear on the 1860 Census for Jasper County, Missouri. However, their sons and Rhoda’s daughter by her first marriage do appear on that census: Elizabeth J. (Denton) Buckingham and her family in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 10, 1860(27);  Samuel Gill as a farm laborer in the Aaron Foster household in Marion, Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 3, 1860(28); Daniel Gill in the Milly Catherine Spence Jones household, Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 9, 1860(29); and Isaac Ivy Gill in the Elizabeth Inman Spence Household, Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 11, 1860(29).  Michael and Rhoda do not appear on the 1860 Census. I believe that both of them died in June 1860. The August 1, 1860 land warrant to Michael was issued after his death. And the next question is what killed them?

The suspected culprits?

Influenza, Yellow Fever or Cholera!

According to the American Epidemics from the Genealogy Quest Website, Missouri and other places had their share of problems from 1850 through the Civil War.  In my chart below, I stopped with the smallpox epidemic in Pennsylvania in 1860-61. Missouri’s unique problem stemmed from the fact  that so many settlers were moving there mostly from the South where the epidemics were so great, and they were bringing the diseases with them: “Wintering each year in the Deep South, in the spring the disease would join the emigrants heading west. Cholera made its way up the Missouri on riverboats. An outbreak on board the Yellowstone in July 1833 turned it into a floating death trap. One of the few survivors, Joseph La Barge, later recalled that just below Kansas City he buried eight victims in one grave. Fear of an epidemic caused Missouri residents in Jackson County to threaten to destroy the ship(31). The list below is from American Epidemics:

1850 Nationwide Yellow Fever
1850 Alabama, New York Cholera
1850-1 North America Influenza
1851 Coles Co., IL, The Great Plains, and Missouri Cholera
1852 Nationwide Yellow Fever
1853 New Orleans Yellow Fever: 8,000 died
1853 Mobile Yellow Fever: 1,191 deaths
1853 Vicksburg Yellow Fever: 500 deaths
1853 Lake Providence, LA. Yellow Fever: 165 deaths
1853 Philadelphia Yellow Fever: 128 deaths
1853 Jackson, Miss. Yellow Fever: 112 deaths
1855 Nationwide Yellow Fever
1857-9 Worldwide Influenza: one of the greatest epidemics
1860-1 Pennsylvania Smallpox(31)

 

I am reminded of another experience I had while researching my Grandmother Inman’s Clay/Klee line. My second great-grandfather, John Clay (1794-1844) was living in Franklin Twp., Summit County, Ohio. The Clay farms were close together, and John was working over at his uncle, Christian Clay’s farm where he contracted cholera.  Howard and I visited Franklin Twp. while on our way to Pennsylvania one year. The graves are lined up in a row in the Grill Cemetery in Summit County: John, his uncle and his uncle’s family–all of them dying within a few days, weeks or months of each other in 1844. Something similar to this happened in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri between 1849 and 1860:

Lewis Jones–1849

Daniel Spence–1857

Daniel Bryant–1858 (the father of Adeline Elizabeth Bryant and father-in-law of Lazarus Spence)

Polly Pewitt Spence–1859

Samuel Perry Spence–July 1859

Rebecca Jane Spence (daughter of Samuel)–1859

Rhoda Louisa Spence Gill–June 1860

Michael David Gill–June 1860

and  others.

Michael David Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence are probably buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Their graves are not marked.

This article concludes in Part Two

 

References

(1) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee about James W. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) Probate File for James W. Denton, d. 1861, Smith County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James W. Denton and Sophia Shaw. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Probate File for James W. Denton, d. 1880, Maury County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James W. Denton and Rhoda Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo. Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) Tennessee State Marriage Records for Williamson Alexander and Milly Ann Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee, James W Denton Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) 1820 Census for Charlotte County, Virginia, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) 1830 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) 1840 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) 1850 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907, 10 Mar 1856 for Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.

(14) U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907, 15 May 1857 for Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907, 1 Aug 1860 for Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) Samuel S. Gill Military File, Company A, 2nd Reg’t, 11th Missouri Infantry C.S.A., 1862-1865. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(17) George Clinton “Clint” Masters Find-a-Grave Memorial No. 14599940. Index at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) djgill40, Comment on Greenwood Cemetery Photo submitted to Ancestry from Find-a-Grave, 10 May 2015. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(19) 1870 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Daniel David Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) 1880 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Daniel David Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) 1900 Census for White Rock, McDonald County, Missouri, Daniel David Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1880 Census for Newton County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) 1900 Census for Newton County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(24) 1910 Census for Newton County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(25) 1920 Census for McDonald County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(26) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(27) 1860 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, James M. Buckingham Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(28) 1860 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Aaron Foster Household. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(29) 1860 Census for Jackson Township, Jasper County, Missouri, Milly Catherine Spence Jones Household. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(30) 1860 Census for Jackson Township, Jasper County, Missouri, Elizabeth Inman Spence Household. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Access: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(31) “Cholera” from the Kansapedia Website: The Kansas Historical Society: Copyright 2015. Author: Unknown.  Article Created: June 2013. Article Modified: February 2013. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at: http://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/cholera/12010

(32) American Epidemics from the Genealogy Quest Website. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://genealogy-quest.com/glossary-terms/american-epidemics/

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Twelve: A Mystery in the Household–William Spence of Weakley County, Tennessee (1809-1856)

New Hope Methodist Church Cemetery Sign, Weakley County, Tennessee. Photo from Find-a-Grave.com

New Hope Methodist Church Cemetery Sign, Weakley County, Tennessee. Photo from Find-a-Grave.com

New Hope Methodist Church Building, Weakley County, Tennessee

New Hope Methodist Church Building, Weakley County, Tennessee. Photo from Find-a-Grave.com

 

The New Hope United Methodist Church, located in the northern edges of Weakley County Tennessee, was organized 148 years ago. On November 12, 1831, Walter H. Jones sold to William Spence, James S. Wood, James T. McFall, Jepe W. Ballard, John Davis and William H. Jones, Trustees of the New Hope Meeting House, a parcel of land for $5 upon which to build a house of public worship. This small church building was hewed from poplar logs and was the first of three buildings.

Other land was deeded to the church by John S. Wood on August 10, 1842; R. F. Roberts on August 9, 1850, and Abe Sawyers on August 9, 1880. On August 15, 1891, A. Sawyers gave an acre to the church for a burying ground. The church bought land from Mr. Sawyer on July 30, 1895 for additional burying grounds, and on August 12, 1895 land was purchased from T. J. and Sallie Spence.

The present structure was built in 1915. A basement was added in 1953 and remodeling of the front entrance was completed in 1963. In 1962-63, a new parsonage located on Frankie Lane in S. Fulton was purchased by New Hope and other churches on the charge of Harris and Chapel Hill(1).

William Spence, a twin of Rhoda Louisa Spence and a son of Elisha and Susanna Spence, was born March 28, 1809 in Randolph County or in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, and he died  before October 7, 1856 when his will was filed in Weakley County, Tennessee. An abstract of his Will follows:

Spence, William — September 19, 1856

Wife — Nancy

Son — Thornton

Dau — Sarah

Exec.  Daniel Spence and William Cloar

Wit– C. M. Wheeler and J. M. Bennet

Filed: October 7, 1856.  p. 390-391(2).

William and his twin Rhoda Louisa were still infants when their mother died in 1810.  Elisha Spence married Jane Bell on October 25, 1810 in Davidson County, Tennessee(3), so Jane would become the mother William, Rhoda Louisa and Susan Rhoda would remember. Their mother died in childbirth with Susan, and Daniel was four years old at the time of his mother’s death. He remembered his mother and was reluctant to accept Jane at first. But he soon bonded with her. For Samuel, Levi, and Milly Catherine, Jane seemed like an older sister. She was only five years older than Samuel. Between 1810 and 1820, William watched his older siblings leave home. Samuel and Levi departed first, followed by Milly Catherine and eventually, Daniel. William remained at home with his twin and younger sister. Beginning 1811 or 1813, four additional children would arrive of the new marriage. [They will be discussed in Part 14.]

Tracing William Spence and his family members has been a real challenge. I thought it would be easy at first because of the information I found in Weakley Remembered years ago(4). Like so many older publications, some of the material was in error–and it took me an extra week tearing into all of that. In this case, I think the Civil War was the culprit behind the loss of so many verifiable records. When armies went into an area, they often sacked and burned the courthouse because they wanted to destroy those records. I am reminded of an account I read several years ago where the citizens in a Virginia county put the records on wagons and moved them from place to place with the Union Army behind them. There was a great deal of fighting and sacking and burning in Western Tennessee during the Civil War.  So that is the reason for the problem.

According to Weakley Remembered, the first settlements there occurred in 1820. Weakley notes that before then, there were few white persons in the area. Then in 1780, “North Carolina issued thousands of land grants” there. Most of these early grants were for military service, or they were land specific(5). Weakley County was created October 21, 1823 and was completed in 1825(6).

The following concerns William Spence:

William Spence, b. March 28, 2809-d. Sept. 24, 1856. Married Nancy _________ (1804-1874). Both buried in the New Hope Cemetery near Ruthville, Weakley County(7).

The children are identified as follows:

Children:

Thornton J. Spence (1836-1908)

m. 1873 Sarah Ellen Morgan (1856-1940)

Sarah Spence m. Thos. James

Mark Spence, d. 1874

Daniel C. Spence, d. July 20, 1870–died after a horse fell on him

Samuel Spence–killed by falling tree cutting wood

James Lane Spence m. 1881 Margaret Elizabeth Dunlop(8)

I will stop here. James Lane Spence was actually Joseph Lane Spence. Joseph Lane Spence was actually a son of Samuel Spence of this narrative, and a grandson of William Spence of Weakley County, per the following death record:

Name: Joseph Lane Spence
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 11 Nov 1854
Birth Place: Tennessee
Age: 78
Death Date: 27 Dec 1932
Death Place: Martin, Weakley, Tennessee
Father’s name: Sam Spence
Father’s Birth Place: Tennessee
Mother’s name: Sarah Woods
Mother’s Birth Place: Tennessee
Certificate Number: 28103
Wills and Probates: Search for Joseph Lane Spence in Tennessee Wills & Probates collection (9)

William Spence’s story follows.

A son William’s age still appears in the Elisha Spence household in Davidson County, Tennessee on the 1820 Census(10). William would have been eleven years old. By 1825, he probably went out to Perry County where his brothers Samuel and Daniel and his sister Milly Catherine Spence Jones were living. Other Spence relatives resided in that area, including Amos Spence (1800-1830) and his brother Jordan Pearce Spence (1792-1878)–sons of Edward Spence (1760-1802) and Esther Pearce (1765-1800). [Another brother of Amos and Jordan, William Spence (1795-1869), resided in Davidson County, Tennessee. He appears on the records there as early as 1810, so he must have relocated to Tennessee with the Elisha Spence group.] By 1830, William of Weakley’s brother, Levi James Spence, returned from North Carolina and settled in Madison County, also in Western Tennessee(11).

William married Nancy Hale (1810-1874), reportedly in Tennessee based upon the birth of their first child the following year. However, several of his older children were born in North Carolina until 1840, when he first appears on the census for Weakley County, Tennessee(12). His son, Samuel Spence, appears on the 1860 Census for Weakley County with a birth place listed as North Carolina(13). It is possible that William returned to Randolph County, North Carolina where a large family of Hales lived. That’s where he met Nancy Hale, and they were married in North Carolina and not in Tennessee. (To date, I have not been able to find anything about her family. I’m beginning to think that she was an orphan who was raised by another family. If this is true, it would explain part of the mystery coming up later in this article.) Rebecca was the first daughter born in Tennessee in 1839–so they would have been in Weakley County by then.

The children of William Spence and Nancy Hale follow:

1. Samuel Spence (1830-bef. 1870). Samuel was born about 1830 in Randolph County, North Carolina, and he died before 1870 in Weakley County, Tennessee after being struck by a falling tree. His wife was Sarah Woods (b. 1830). Their children were:

a. Ellen Spence (b. 1846)

b. Joseph Lane “Bud” Spence (1854-1932). Joseph was born November 11, 1854 in Weakley County Tennessee, and he died December 27, 1932 in Martin, Weakley County, Tennessee. His wife was Margaret Elizabeth Dunlap (b. 1850). I only have his children’s names: (I) Bud Spence; (ii) Willis Spence; (iii) Rice Spence; (iv) Mozell Spence; (v) Fannie Spence; (vi) Lockie Spence; (vii) Edna Spence; (viii) Leila Spence; (ix) Ellen Spence. Those names are listed in Weakley Remembered(14).

c. Ellen T. Spence (b. 1857)

d. Lafayette Spence (b. 1857)

e. Wilson Spence (b. 1858)

f. Henrietta Spence (b. 1859)

2. Sarah Spence (b. 1834). She married Thomas James. I have no additional information.

3. Thornton Jefferson Spence (1836-1908). Thornton was born in Pasquotank, North Carolina about 1836–indicating the William Spence family had moved from Randolph to the Pasquotank area. He died August 30, 1908 in Weakley County, Tennessee. According to his Find-a-Grave Memorial, Thornton served with the Confederate Army in Co. K, 12th Kentucky Cavalry during the Civil War(15). His wife was Sarah Emaline Morgan (1856-1940). Their children were:

a. Sarah E. Spence (b. 1882)

b. Robert P. Spence (b. 1884)

c. Martha J. Spence (b. 1886)

d. Thornton V. Spence (b. 1889)

e. Ruth A. Spence (b. 1897)

Additional children for Thornton are listed in the “Mystery” section below.

4. Rebecca Spence (b. 1839) I have no additional information.

5. Joseph Washington Reed (1840-1925). Joseph is the mystery in the family. He will be discussed below.

6. Mark Spence (1843-1874). Mark was born about 1843 in Weakley County, Tennessee, and he died in Weakley County in 1874. I have no additional information.

7. Daniel C. Spence (1845-1870). Daniel was born in Weakley County, Tennessee, and he died July 20, 1870 after a horse fell on him. I have no additional information.

8. John Spence (b. 1848). No additional information.

 

The Mystery of  Joseph Washington Reed (1840-1925)

Joseph Washington Reed (1840-1925) and Matilda Chambers Scofield (1855-1926). Photo submitted to Ancestry.com by patriciareed47 Aug 15, 2011. Photo taken about 1910 in Kentucky

Joseph Washington Reed (1840-1925) and Matilda Chambers Scofield (1855-1926). Photo submitted to Ancestry.com by patriciareed47 Aug 15, 2011. Photo taken about 1910 in Kentucky

Friday, 24 May 1996

Barbara,

This information below is from Weakley Co Remembered. I am looking for a Louisa Spence who married Wilson Reed and when they were going thru Weakley Co from NC to Mo in 1840 she had a baby (my GGGrandfather) and died after childbirth. I have not any of her family but wondered who these people are. See old messages below:

Seeking information on the SPENCE family of Weakley Co TN. Bible records show that Thorten Spence b. 1836, d 1908 married Sarah E. MORGAN. She was b 1856 d 1940. Children born between 1875 and 1896 were: W.D. Spence, Jim J. Spence, N.L. Spence, Sarah Elizabeth Spence, Robert Pain Spence, Martha Jane Spence, Thorton Van Vuron Spence, John Wesley Spence, Luther Mark Spence, Ruth Anna Spence.

Thornton SPENCE’s father was William SPENCE b. 1809 d 1856. His mother was Nancy ?  b. 1804 d. 1874.

Is there any relationship between this SPENCE family and Louisa SPENCE Reed who died in childbirth in Weakley Co TN in 1840?(16)

Yes, Sara, I believe there is!

This question has perplexed me for years. I didn’t unravel it until recently, and believe that I finally have it figured out.

The 1850 Census for the William Spence household in Weakley County, Tennessee shows the following:

William Spence (42)

Nancy Spence (46)

Sarah Spence (16)

Thornton Spence (14)

Rebecca Spence (11)

Joseph Spence (9)

Mark Spence (7)

Daniel Spence (5)

John Spence (2) (17)

Joseph Washington Reed was born March 8, 1840 in Weakley County, Tennessee, and he died July 27, 1925 in Weakley County. He was the son of Wilson D. Reed (1802-1865) and Louisa Spence (1814-1840). Wilson’s family wasn’t difficult to find.  He was born in 1802 in Warren County, North Carolina to a J. W. Reed (1785-1857), and he died after 1865 in Warren County, Missouri.  He appears on the 1860 Census in Howell County, Missouri, but he apparently died after 1865 in Warren County. One possible reason for his move? He served in the Union Army during the Civil War!

He married Louisa Spence about 1839 in North Carolina. They were on their way to Missouri when Louisa died after childbirth March 8, 1840. According to Sara Stinchcomb, the Wilsons stopped at an inn in Weakley County when Louisa went into labor. The following is from an email message I received from Sara after she received my initial reply:

“Barbara,

Your messages are very exciting!! My GGGrandfather Joseph Washington REED (born 1840) the son of Louisa SPENCE Reed named his first son Samuel James and the second son William Joseph and my Grandfather Martin Alonzo (Martin is a family name in the wife’s family). The daughters were Ida Eugenia, Margaret Louisa and Minnie Ina. Louisa’s husband. Wilson REED went on to Missouri where he is found in 1860 census with a new wife and children in Howell County.

Do you know of connection of the SPENCE family with a CONNER family? The home (inn?) where Wilson and Louisa SPENCE Reed stopped in Weakley Co to have the baby was owned by the Samuel CONNER family and the CONNER family raised the child. Joseph Washington REED. They called this little community there in Weakley County “Pasquotank” I understand from oral family tradition.

The Conner family came to Weakley Co. from Knox Co area of East TN and they were originally from VA. I just can’t help but believe that he would not have left the child with total strangers and they would raise him like a son which they did unless there had been some family or neighborhood tie back in VA or NC….(18)

Wilson’s second wife’s name was Martha (last name unknown), and they had the following children: (a) Eliza J. Reed (b. 1846); (b) Alonzo Reed (b. 1849); (c) Thomas M. Reed (b. 1851).  His wife Martha filed for his Civil War Military Pension April 23, 1891, so he may have lived until then(19).

I do not know of a specific connection between that Conner family and the Spence family of Weakley County. Since Joseph appears on the 1850 Census in William’s household, I believe the Conners took care of him until they could find a family for him. They knew the Spence family in Weakley and they also knew that Louisa was a Spence. But the story goes much deeper than that. Louisa was related to William Spence. She knew William and his family resided in Weakley County. That is why the Reeds were trying to make it there before Louisa had her baby.  The following is a summary of my research. My conclusions result from the research presented here.

The name Louisa was prominent among the Pasquotank Spence families. William Spence’s twin  sister’s name was Rhoda LOUISA Spence.  In order to understand this narrative, I need to go back to the progenitor of Louisa Spence Reed’s line: Isaac Spence (1722-1806).

Not a great deal is known about Isaac Spence beyond his dates. Many people think that he was born in Duplin County, North Carolina. But that county wasn’t formed until 1750 from New Hanover County. Some people think he came from Virginia, but I could find no satisfaction there. The more I fussed around with this thing, the more I was able to conclude that Isaac was born in Pasquotank County, North Carolina. But to which family?

Sara Stinchcomb was right when she said that Wilson Reed would not have galloped off until assured his son was in protective, caring hands. It is important to remember something else. William Spence returned to North Carolina and was first in Randolph County and then Pasquotank. Quite possibly, William knew Wilson and Louisa Spence Reed. William and his family returned to Tennessee about 1839. Wilson and Louisa were married about 1839. William and Nancy may have relocated to Weakley after the wedding! So my search for Isaac Spence’s family targeted William Spence’s line. After digging through my old North Carolina Research Notebook and reviewing everything I discovered about Isaac Spence, I discovered what I was looking for–something I at one time considered.

Isaac Spence (1722-1806) was a twin of my fifth great-grandfather William Edward Spence (1722-1785). They were the sons of James Spence (1702-1753) and Elizabeth Greaves (1707-1755). So the information concerning the children of James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves now look like this: [NOTE: I am only detailing Isaac here since the others have been detailed in a previous article. I will insert a link to that article HERE for their information]:

1. Isaac Spence (1722-1806). Isaac was born in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, and he died in Pasquotank County in 1806(20). His wife’s name was Esther, and nothing else is known about her. Isaac and his twin brother William Edward Spence (1722-1785)  traveled about North Carolina together.  Isaac first appears on Pasquotank records on the 1786 Census(21). He also appears on the 1790 Census for Pasquotank County(22). Isaac and Esther Spence had two children: (a) Isaac Spence (1745-1820) and (b) Nancy Spence, who died after 1806. Nancy is the only child listed in Isaac’s will. By 1806, his son Isaac had re-established himself in Duplin County. The rest of this narrative will be devoted to Isaac Jr’s line.

Isaac Spence (1745-1820)

Isaac Spence was born in Pasquotank, North Carolina in 1745, and he died in Cumberland County, North Carolina October 21, 1820. On April 27, 1769, Isaac married Mary Elizabeth Bowden (1744-1821) in Duplin County, North Carolina. They had the following children [NOTE: These children have been terribly confused. I am following The Heritage of Harnett County, North Carolina for their names.]:

  1. John Spence (1770-1830). John was born in Duplin County, North Carolina in 1770, and he died in Cumberland County, North Carolina in 1830. His wife was Rhody Rebecah Dean (1780-1870). Their children were:  (a) Delila Spence, born 1801; (b) Timothy Spence (1825-1850); (c) Martha Spence; (d) Olivia Spence; (e) Nancy Spence(23). According to The Heritage of Harnett County, North Carolina: “John Spence moved from Duplin County to the area that is now Harnett County just before Thomas Jefferson became President (about 1800). Then his father and two brothers moved up to join him.  The father, Isaac Spence, was born about 1745, and records show his marriage in Duplin County in 1769, six years before the beginning of the American Revolution. The brothers were Timothy and Elisha. John bought land on Neill’s Creek and Hector’s Creek in 1805. His father and brothers sold all of their holdings in Duplin and began buying land in Harnett. Timothy built a log house near what is now the Christian Light Community. In the woods, a few hundred yards off the paved road, is a graveyard where the first Spence settlers are buried. The grave markers are large stones bearing no lettering(24).  
  2. Timothy W. Spence, Jr (1771-1852). The subject under discussion here.
  3. Elisha Spence (1775-aft 1840). (When I discovered this Elisha Spence, I understood where my fourth great-grandfather (Elisha Spence) obtained his name. This Elisha Spence was born in 1775. My Elisha Spence was born in 1776).  Elisha Spence was born in 1775 in Duplin County, North Carolina.  After the deaths of his parents, he moved to Johnston County, North Carolina, where  he married Nancy Wood, Jr. on November 25, 1823.  I know nothing else about her but tend to connect her surname with the same Wood or Woods family in Weakley County, Tennessee. (William Spence’s son, Samuel, married Sarah Wood (b. 1830). Unfortunately, I do not have the names of Elisha and Nancy’s children. Elisha last appears on the 1840 Census for Johnston County, North Carolina(26).

Timothy W. Spence, Jr (1771-1852)

The father of Louisa Spence Reed, Timothy W. Spence was born June 4, 1771 in Duplin County, North Carolina, and he died May 3, 1852 in Cumberland County, North Carolina. I would like to think his middle name was William! In 1791, he married Martha Futch (1778-1853) in Barnwell, South Carolina.  They had a large family. Each time I look into their family, I find someone new–so that is something I need to research later. For now, I am going to list the names that I have and will focus on Louisa here. Whenever I complete the study of this family, I will write a later article.

The children of Timothy W. Spence and Martha Futch that I have to date are:

  1. Anne Spence (1790-1834)
  2. Polly Spence (1792-1837)
  3. Isaac Spence (1794-1848)
  4. Thomas Spence (1795-1860)
  5. Elizabeth Spence (1796-1828)
  6. Sarah Spence (1798-1850)
  7. James Spence (1800-1870)
  8. John Spence (1800-1882)
  9. Ingram Spence (1802-1880)
  10. Anne Spence (1804-1880)
  11. Catherine Spence (1807-1880)
  12. Matthew Spence (1808-1843)
  13. Timothy W. Spence (1809-1878)
  14. Daniel Spence (1811-1898)
  15. Louisa Spence (1814-1840). Under discussion here
  16. Eliza Spence (1817-1862)

Louisa Spence (1814-1840). Louisa was born November 4, 1814 in Cumberland County, North Carolina, and she died in childbirth March 8, 1840 in Weakley County, Tennessee. She was the wife of Wilson D. Reed (1802-aft 1865). They are the parents of Joseph Washington Reed (1840-1925). Wilson’s father’s initials were reportedly J.W. Reed. Perhaps his full name was Joseph Washington Reed. Joseph (1840) was named for his grandfather.

There are other significant names involved in this study. One of them is Reed. Louisa Spence’s husband was a Reed, whose father’s name was apparently J. W. Reed. However, Louisa’s uncle, John Spence, married Rhody Rebecah Dean (1780-1870). Rhody was the daughter of Hardy Robinson Dean (1740-1823) and Elizabeth Jane Reed (1752-1823). Hardy’s family came from England and settled in North Carolina. But Elizabeth was possibly an orphan. She was taken to New England where she was raised by Ezra Dean (1718-1806) and Sarah Snow (b. 1719). No one knows the identity of her real parents, but her surname was Reed. Ezra Dean was a descendant of Walter Dean (1612-1693) and Eleanor Strong (1613-1693) of Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts. They evidently raised Elizabeth as their own daughter–a theme that runs throughout these family lines. Eventually, she returned to North Carolina, where she married Hardy Robinson Dean. There is a possibility that Wilson Reed and Louisa Spence were distantly related.

I don’t know whether Wilson D. Reed ever reconnected with his son. Joseph Washington Reed used the Spence surname while he was living in William’s household. But they did not hide his parentage from him, and he used the Reed surname when on his own.

William Spence died in 1856 in Weakley County, Tennessee. His will dated September 19, 1856 lists his wife Nancy, son Thornton, daughter Sarah. Daniel Spence was Executor of his estate along with William Cloar. The witnesses were CM Wheeler and J.M. Bennett. It was filed October 7, 1856(27).  After his death, Joseph (a blacksmith) went to live with the Conners at their inn, where he appears on the 1860 Census(28).

Joseph married Victoria Scofield (1844-1872) in 1865 in Weakley County. They had the following children:

  1. Lena Martha Reed (1867-1896)
  2. Georgia Reed (b. 1868)
  3. John Reed (1871-1872)

His second wife was Matilda Elizabeth Chambers (1855-1926), whom he married February 25, 1874 in Obion, Tennessee. Their children were:

  1. Ida Reed (1878-1953)
  2. Samuel James Reed (1879-1960)
  3. William J. Reed (1881-1975)
  4. Martin E. Reed (1885-1968)
  5. Mary L. Reed (b. 1887)
  6. Lula Mae Reed (1887-1970)
  7. Martha A. Reed (b. 1890)
  8. Minnie Ima Reed (1890-1977)
  9. Thomas Reed (no information).

Joseph Washington Reed died July 27, 1925 in Weakley County, Tennessee. He was buried July 28, 1925 in the New Hope Methodist Cemetery, Weakley County, Tennessee–the same cemetery where the William Spence family is buried.

 

References

(1) Weakley County, Tennessee Cemetery Listings. p. 376.

(2) Weakley County, Tennessee Will Book A–1828-1842.

(3) Tennessee Marriage Records about Elisha Spence and Jane Bell. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.

(4) Baker, Pansy, Nancy Reynolds, Charlotte Stout. Weakley Remembered: Weakley County, Tennessee. Skullbone Printing, Bradford, Tennessee.

(5) Weakley Remembered, Vol. 2, p. 4.

(6) Weakley Remembered, Vol. 2, p. 4.

(7) Weakley Remembered, Vol. 3, pp 85-86

(8) Weakley Remembered, Vol. 3, pp 85-86

(9) Tennessee, Death Records, (1908-1958). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) 1820 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) 1830 Census for Levi Spence, Madison County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) 1840 Census for William Spence, Weakley County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) 1860 Census for Samuel Spence, Weakley County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) Weakley Remembered, Vol. 3, pp. 85-86.

(15) Find-a-Grave Memorial 19946446 about Thornton Jefferson Spence. Find-a-Grave Index. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) Sara Reed Stinchcomb, Spence-L Digest. Rootsweb.com. Message posted 24 May 1996. [May be in the old archives] http://www.rootsweb.com.

(17) 1850 Census for William Spence, Weakley County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) Sara Reed Stinchcomb, Spence-L Digest. Rootsweb.com. Message posted 24 May 1996. [May be in the old archives] http://www.rootsweb.com

(19) U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 for Wilson Reed, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 about Isaac Spence.  Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) North Carolina Census Records, 1790-1890 about Isaac Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1790 Census for Pasquotank, North Carolina about Isaac Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) The Heritage Book of Harnett County, North Carolina, Vol I, 1993. Portions available at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(24) The Heritage Book of Harnett County, North Carolina, Vol I, 1993. Portions available at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(25) North Carolina Marriage Collection, 1741-2004 about Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(26) 1840 Census, Johnston County, North Carolina about Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(27) William Spence Will Abstract: Will dated 19 Sep 1856; Filed 7 Oct 1856. Weakley County, Tennessee Will Book A 1828-1842, p. 390-391.

(28) 1860 Census, Weakley County, Tennessee for Joseph Washington Reed. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 16 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Eleven: The Case for Elizabeth Spence (1804-1809/10)

A rose for Elizabeth

A rose for Elizabeth

 

Years ago, when I first began searching for the children of Elisha Spence, I recall seeing a record for Elizabeth Spence, born 1808. I found it in the old IGI records. After the passage of time and after being unable to discover anything else about her, I deleted her from the list I was compiling. And that’s when I began hearing from people.

“What about Elizabeth?” they asked.

Sometimes they added a surname:

“What about Elizabeth Ramseur?”

(Believe it or not, I found that item in one of my notebooks: a copy of an old email someone sent me over twenty-years ago.)

“Her surname was Ramseur!” I responded. “I’m looking for Spence.”

Ultimately, I decided that submitters of early records confused Elizabeth Ramseur with Elizabeth Spence. As noted in the update I provided in the James Spence of Randolph County article, Elizabeth Ramseur married Malachi Spence. Malachi Spence was a son of David Spence and Esther Lombard. And David Spence was another son of James Spence and Lucy Upton of Randolph County, North Carolina. There was no way Elizabeth Ramseur was a daughter of Elisha Spence!  However, the name Elizabeth still haunted me, and I began wondering What if there was an Elizabeth?

An excellent possibility! I recently noted that Elisha and Susanna had a child every year or every other year. Samuel was born in 1800. Milly Catherine was born in 1802. Daniel was born in 1806. The twins were born in 1809. And their last daughter Susan was born in 1810. Elizabeth could have been born between Milly Catherine and Daniel or between Daniel and the twins. Susanna’s mother was Caroline Elizabeth Toney.  Young Elizabeth’s full name could have been Caroline Elizabeth Spence and typical of the old Spence custom–her family referred to her by her middle name.

I must admit, the more I thought about Elizabeth, the more I became convinced that she did exist and that she was probably born between Milly Catherine and Daniel. I began checking various records on ancestry making certain I didn’t have her confused with someone else. A number of Spence families resided in in Surry, Rowan, and Guilford County who came from other lines. For example, there was an Elizabeth Betty Spence (1812/13-1843) who was the daughter of James Spence (1775-1826) and Mary Coots (1775-1815). This Elizabeth Spence was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, and she died in Harris County, Georgia. She married McAlvin Howell Spence (1810-1899). He was the son of Nathan Spence, Jr. (1785-1853) and Adeline Reeves (1784-1848). McAlvin was born in Rockingham County, North Carolina, and he died in Harris County, Georgia. James Spence and Nathan Spence, Jr. were brothers. They were the sons of Nathan Spence, Sr. (1743-1833) and Elizabeth Quinnelly (1745-1820), the grandsons of John Spence (1715-1772) and Mary Nutter (1725-1773), and the great grandsons of Patrick Spence (1680-1746) and Phoebe Sasserson (b. 1680). This branch of the Patrick Spence family settled in Talbot County, Maryland, settled next in Delaware, removed to Guilford County, North Carolina, and then relocated to Georgia. Elizabeth Betty Spence was not the Elizabeth I was seeking. She was born in 1812 or 1813 in North Carolina, long after the Elisha Spence family settled in Tennessee. And the Guilford County/Rockingham Spences were from a different line.

There are a number of Elizabeth Spences of record born between 1800 and 1808 in North Carolina, but none of them connect as a child in the Elisha Spence family. I searched the counties from Randolph, Davidson, Surry, Guilford, Rockingham, Rowan and Burke Counties and could not find a qualifying candidate for the role. The Elizabeths I found had a different surname at birth and took the Spence surname after marriage, or they were Spences at birth but were from a different line.

So what have I concluded?

I tend to believe that yes, there was an Elizabeth Spence, who was the daughter of Elisha and Susanna Spencer Spence. I believe that she was probably born between Milly Catherine and Daniel, making her year of birth about 1804. She may have died in infancy, and she may have lived a few years. I think it is possible that she died before Daniel’s birth in 1806. A female child her age does not appear on Tennessee census records in the Elisha Spence family, so she definitely passed away prior to the family’s departure for Tennessee. She may have lived until 1809 or very early 1810.

I believe that she did exist for a number of reasons:

  1. The number of people who contacted me about her when I first started researching the Spence family. They were either relying on the same old IGI record I discovered, or else they had heard a story that a daughter named Elizabeth died young.
  2. Given the fact that Elisha and Susanna named their children after specific family members or friends, it seemed odd to me that none of them were named for Susanna’s mother. I have several DNA connections with Caroline Elizabeth Toney so as far as I am concerned, the identity of Susanna’s mother is no longer in question.
  3. Because of the distance between Milly Catherine and Daniel, it is quite possible that Elisha and Susanna had a daughter in 1804, who died late 1809 or early 1810. The 1804 date is more likely than the 1808 date.

So, yes, I believe there was a Caroline Elizabeth Spence, who was born in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1804 and who died in Randolph County in 1809 or  very early 1810 who was the daughter of Elisha Spence and Susanna Spencer.

 

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Ten: The Children of Daniel Spence (1806-1857) and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859)

Joel Spence (1832-1896) and Martha Jane Hood (1828-1887)

Joel Spence (1832-1896) and Martha Jane Hood (1828-1887). Photo sent to me by Wayne Spence.

John William Spence (1864-1935) and Myrta Alzina Moss (1877-1953)

John William Spence (1864-1935) and Myrta Alzina Moss (1877-1953). Photo sent to me by Wayne Spence.

John William Spence (1864-1935) and Daniel Wayne "Tucker" Spence (1859-1940)

John William Spence (1864-1935) and Daniel Wayne “Tucker” Spence (1859-1940) Photo sent to me by Wayne Spence.

 

As noted in the previous article, Daniel Spence was born in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1806, and he died in Jasper County, Missouri in April 1857. His wife Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1810, and she died in October 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri. They were married in Williamson County, Tennessee on December 9, 1828(1). Their children follow:

Joel Spence (1832-1896)

Joel Spence was born August 17, 1832 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died January 20, 1896 in Jasper County, Missouri. On September 7, 1853, he married Martha Jane Hood in Jasper County, Missouri(2). She was a daughter of  Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)–my third great grandparents. [Note: I will be covering the Hood line in a later article.] This family fled to Kansas during the Civil War and in Lawrence, Douglas, Kansas and in Palmyra, Douglas, Kansas. They were probably in Lawrence during the Quantrill Massacre, although I believe they probably lived on a farm outside the town. It would have been a frightening experience for them.  According to an article titled “Lawrence, Massacre: August 21, 1863”:

The bloody guerrilla fighting along the Kansas-Missouri border that began with the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854 only got bloodier with the coming of the Civil War. Union Brig. Gen. Thomas Ewing, Gen. William T. Sherman’s brother-in-law, was assigned to command the District of the Border, where he was faced with the seemingly impossible task of trying to stop Confederate raiders–primarily the guerrilla band led by the notorious William C. Quantrill.

In 1863, Ewing began arresting women suspected of aiding Quantrill’s men. Many were mothers, sisters, and wives of the guerillas. Ewing jailed some in a dilapidated three story building in Kansas City. On August 14, the building collapsed, killing four of the women and seriously injuring others. Four days later, Ewing ordered that the wives and children of known guerillas were “to remove out of this district and out of the State of Missouri forthwith.”

Seeking revenge, Quantrill and 450 men set out on August 19 for the abolitionist stronghold of Lawrence, Kans. They stormed into the town with blazing guns at daybreak on August 21. For three hours they committed an orgy of burning, pillaging, and massacring its citizens. The victims were shot down in front of their families or burned up in their houses. At 9:00 A.M. the raiders departed, leaving 80 new widows, 250 fatherless children, and a smoldering ruin of a town. Fewer than 20 of Quantrill’s 150 victims were soldiers. No women were physically harmed.

Quantrill had lived in Lawrence for a short time before the war and had a vengeance list of persons to be disposed of. He got them all except for the one on the top of the list, Sen. Jim Lane, the leader of a band of Union guerrillas that had been making raids into Missouri. On the morning of Quantrill’s raid, Lane had heard the horses coming and hid in a cornfield in his nightshirt until the raiders left.

Fascinating Fact: Four of Quantrill’s raiders at Lawrence were Cole, James, John, and Robert Younger. Known as the Younger Brothers after the war, they teamed up with Frank and Jesse James to rob banks, trains, and stagecoaches (3).

 They returned to Newton County, Missouri after the war was over. About a year after his wife’s death, Joel married Sarah Elizabeth Copple (1842-1932) in Jasper County, Missouri.

The children of Joel Spence and Martha Jane Hood follow:

  1. Myra L. Spence (1855-1857). Myra was born April 16, 1855 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died July 12, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri. She is buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery.
  2. Permilia Jane Spence (1856-1879). Permilia was born December 5, 1856 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died August 28, 1879 in Jasper County, Missouri. She is buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery.
  3. Daniel Wayne “Tucker” Spence (1859-1940).  Daniel was born June 21, 1859 in Newton County, Missouri, and he died August 14, 1940 in Marion, Newton, Missouri. His wife was Mattie Alberta Benschotter (1871-1955). Their children were
    1.  Lynwood Alton Spence (1894-1962);
    2. Una Elberta Spence (1907-1976) (4).
  4. Nance Elizabeth “Lizzie” Spence (1862-1926). Nance was born May 25, 1862 in Lawrence, Douglas, Kansas, and she died August 10, 1926 in East Benton, Newton, Kansas. Her husband was Henry H. Burr (1859-1920). Their children were:
    1. Ralph R. Burr (1882-1955);
    2. Bradley Benton Burr (1884-1961);
    3. Pearl Coella Burr (1886-1962);
    4. Oscar E. Burr (1888-1975);
    5. Homer T. Burr (1895-1987);
    6. Claude J. Burr (1898-1985);
    7. Earl L. Burr (1901-1982) (5).
  5. John William Spence (1864-1935). John was born March 27, 1864 in Lawrence, Douglas, Kansas, and he died January 23, 1935 in Union Twp., Jasper County, Missouri.  His wife was Myrta Alzina Moss (1877-1953)(6). She was the daughter of  Samuel Taylor Moss (1846-1921) and Georgia Ann Elliott (1858-1940) and granddaughter of Dr. David Franklin Moss (1815-1908) and Margaret A. Daugherty (1816-1898). The Moss family originally settled in Rappahannock, Virginia. From there they moved to Rowan County, North Carolina. They were in Putnam County, Indiana prior to their removal to Jasper County, Missouri. Their children were:
    1. Hobart Franklin Spence (1897-1975)
    2. Chester Howard Spence (1898-1900)
    3. Clifford Walter Spence (1902-1976)
    4. Martha Georgia Spence (1907-1985)
    5. Claryce Myrtle Spence (1911-1985)
  6. Ida L. Spence (1866-1935). Ida was born in Newton County, Missouri in 1866, and she died in August 1935 in Sapulpa, Creek, Oklahoma. Her husband was William Bannister Hickey (1860-1948). Their son was:
    1. John Brice Hickey (1898-1983)(7).

 

Samuel J Spence (1833-1901)

Samuel was born in December 1833 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1902 in Baldwin City, Douglas, Kansas. His wife was Sarah Elizabeth Bryant (1842-1932)(8).  The Bryant family connects with the Spence family in a number of ways, and I will be dealing with them more fully in a separate article. Sarah Elizabeth was a daughter of David Bryant (1812-1880) and Rachel Spencer (1808-1880). David Bryant was the brother of Daniel Bryant (1804-1858)–the father of Adeline Elizabeth Bryant (1833-1931)–wife of Lazarus Spence (1825-1902). They were the sons of John Bryant (1760-1830) and Ruth Maynor O’Briant (b. 1770). Rachel Spencer was the daughter of John Spencer (b. 1788) and his first wife Rachel (1790-1808). John’s second wife was Rachel Key (b. 1805). Rachel Key was the sister of Lucy Key (1810-1903)–the wife of Daniel Bryant. The Key sisters were the daughters of William Wesley Key (1783-1860) and Susanna Akers (1787-1819). John Spencer’s half-brother, William H. Spencer (1817-1888), was a major figure in the John Bass Jones murder trial which will be portrayed in a later article. The Spencers and Bryants all settled in Franklin County, Virginia. From there they moved to Putnam County, Indiana. And from there, they relocated to Jasper County, Missouri.  Samuel J Spence and his family fled to Kansas during the Civil War. Their children follow:

  1. William David Spence (1861-1886). William David was born August 31, 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died November 17, 1886 in Baldwin City, Douglas, Kansas.
  2. Nellie C. Spence (1865-1934). Nellie was born in 1865 in Palmyra, Douglas, Kansas, and she died April 22, 1934 in Baldwin, Douglas, Kansas.
  3. Samuel Alfred Spence (1866-1886). Samuel was born May 25, 1866 in Baldwin City, Douglas County, Kansas, and he died November 18, 1886 in Baldwin City, Douglas County, Kansas.
  4. Myra Belle Spence (1869-1944). Myra Belle was born in June 1869 in Palmyra, Douglas, Kansas, and she died in July, 1944 in Palmyra, Douglas, Kansas. Her husband was Hewitt Taylor (1859-1944). Their children were:
    1. William A. Taylor, born 1889.
    2. Lucy E. Taylor, born 1895.
    3. Charles H. Taylor, born 1899.

Rhoda Spence (1833-1879)

Rhoda Spence (1833-1879). Rhoda was born in December 1833 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died in 1879 in Osage City, Labette, Kansas. Her husband was James G. Penix (1830-1917) (9). Their children were:

  1. Samuel Lafayette Penix (1854-1905). Samuel was born September 13, 1854 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died July 3, 1905. His first wife was Matilda Shinn (1857-1903). Their children were:
    1. Delia Mae Penix (born 1878)
    2. Charles Lafayette Penix (born 1883-1963)
    3. Robert A. Penix (1885-1909)
    4. Nora B. Penix (1890-1978)
    5. Emma Penix (1893-1897)

His second wife was Minnie Lee Giles (1878-1956). Their children were:

  1. Charles (Charley) L. Penix (b. 1883)
  2. Robert A. Penix (b. 1885)
  3. Silvia Z Penix (1887-1969)
  4. Nora B. Penix (b. 1890)
  5. Travis Jack Penix (1899-1983)
  6. Samuel Lee Penix (1901-1975)
  7. Mearl Penix (1902-1982)
  1. Mary J. Penix (Ellis) (1856-1936). Mary was born in April 1856 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri, and she died April 12, 1936 in Tacoma, Pierce, Washington. Her husband was Luther Ellis (born 1853). Their children were:
    1. Charles F. Ellis (b. 1884)
    2. Laura R. Ellis (b. 1888)
    3. Inez N. Ellis (b. 1892)
  2. Eliza E. Penix (1859-1860). Eliza was born in 1859 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri, and she died after 1860 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri
  3. Milly E. Penix (1861-1865). Milly was born in Missouri in 1861, and she died after May 1865 in Wakarusa, Douglas, Kansas.
  4. Minnie E. Penix (1861-1875) Minnie was born about 1861 in Missouri, and she died after March 1875 in Mound Valley, Labette, Kansas.
  5. George S. Penix (1864-1880). George was born in Kansas in 1864, and he died after 1880 in Mound Valley, Labette, Kansas.
  6. Anna E. Penix (1866-1880). Anna was born in in Kansas about 1866, and she died after 1880 in Mound Valley, Labette, Kansas.
  7. Mattie Penix (1869-1880). Mattie was born about 1869 in Kansas, and she died after 1880 in Mound Valley, Labette, Kansas.

James Penix’s second wife was Mahala “Mollie” (surname unknown). Their children were:

  1. Bessie Penix, born 1885.  Bessie was born in January 1885 in Kansas. She married a Schareta. Her last residence was listed as Oakland, Alameda, California in 1920
  2. Earl Penix (1888-1905).  Earl was born May 9, 1888 in Labette, Kansas. In 1900, he lived in Cherryvale, Montgomery, Kansas. He died in 1905 and is buried in the Griffith Cemetery, Labette County, Kansas.
  3. Verne P. Penix (1890-1940)  Verne was born January 17, 1890 in Cherryvale, Montgomery, Kansas, and she died after 1940 in Kansas City, Wyandotte, Kansas. Her husband was Stratton D. Walker (1882-1940).

Susanna (Susan) Spence (1835-1906)

Susanna (Susan) Spence (1835-1906). Susanna was born in Tennessee June 23, 1835, and she died March 28, 1906 in Jasper County, Missouri. Her husband was Samuel Jackson “Sam” Hood (1834-1877) (10). He was a son of  Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)–my third great grandparents mentioned previously. Their children were:

  1. Joel Newton Hood (1856-1910). Joel was born in November 1856 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died before 1910 in Jasper County, Missouri. His wife was Lucy M. Craig (b. 1866). Their children were:
    1. Arthur Ernest Hood (1883-1942)
    2. Gertrude M. Hood (b. 1886)
  2. Charles Marion Hood (1859-1940). Charles was born in June 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died June 25, 1940 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. His wife was Annis Gertrude Gregory (1860-1936). Their children were:
    1. Edith M. Hood (b. 1889)
    2. Carl W. Hood (b. 1891)
    3. Joseph S. Hood (b. 1894)
    4. Lucille G. Hood (b. 1898)
  3. Margaret Elizabeth Hood (1862-1900). Margaret was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1862, and she died before 1900 in Jasper County, Missouri.
  4. Ezra Phillip Hood (1864-1940). Ezra was born April 28, 1864 in Lowell, Cherokee, Kansas, and he died June 25, 1940 in Webb City, Jasper, Missouri. His wife was Mary “Polly” Crabtree (1869-1952). Their children were:
    1. Nina Alma Hood (b. 1889)
    2. Carl Clayton Hood (1892-1975)
    3. Harry E. Hood (b. 1896)
    4. Ethel Hood (1901-1901)
    5. Edna P. Hood (b. 1902)
    6. John Richard Hood (b. 1903)
    7. Florence Ivie Hood (1904-1989)
    8. Joseph Westly Hood (1907-1988)
    9. Joe Hood (b. 1908)
    10. Walter Hood (1909-1909
  5. Samuel J. Hood (1865-1900). Samuel was born in Kansas in August 1865, and he died before 1900 in Jasper County, Missouri.
  6. Nancy M. Hood (1870-1872). Nancy was born August 27, 1870 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died October 27, 1872 in Jasper County, Missouri.
  7. John F. Hood (1877-1878). John was born August 5, 1877 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died March 12, 1878 in Jasper County, Missouri.

 

Larkin Spence (1839-1860)

Larkin Spence (1839-1860). Larkin was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1839, and he died before 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri (11).

John D. Spence (1843-1893)

John D. Spence (1843-1893). John was born March 18, 1843 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died October 19, 1893 in Jasper County, Missouri. His first wife was Margaret C. Copple (1844-1875) (12). She was a sister of Sarah Elizabeth Copple (1842-1932)–the second wife of Joel Spence. Their parents were Jacob Copple (1805-1871) and Margaret Blaylock (1810-1892). Their children were:

  1. Anna J. Spence (1867-1933). Anna was born September 6, 1867 in Newton County, Missouri, and she died May 23, 1933 in Joplin, Jasper, Missouri. Her husband was John Paul Howard (1859-1933). Their children were:
    1. Perry Franklin Howard (1888-1970).
    2. Cora Howard (b. 1891).  [Married a Jordan]
  2. Alice M. “Alice” Spence (1868-1870). Alice was born in Newton County, Missouri in 1868, and she died in Newton County about 1870.

John’s second wife was Mary Alice Mitchell (1852-1922). Their children were:

  1. Claude Roscoe Spence (1886-1965). Claude was born October 4, 1886 in Newton County, Missouri, and he died March 9, 1965. His wife was Mary Mabel Redden (1889-1968). Their children were:
    1. Beulah May Spence (1914-1919)
    2. Nadine Loretta Spence (1916-2002)
    3. Wylie W. Spence (b. 1921)
  2. Vernie Burton Spence (1891-1977). Vernie was born October 1, 1891 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died April 17, 1977 in Jasper County, Missouri. His wife was Miriam Eliza Randall (1893-1976). Their children were:
    1. Burton Randall Spence (1918-1969)
    2. Hollis Howard Spence (1919-1925)
    3. Alice May Spence (1924-1970)
    4. Laura Gale Spence (b. 1928)
    5. Dorothy Marie Spence (b. 1932).

[Note: A Randall married one of my great grandmother ‘s sisters in Jasper County, Missouri.  My great grandmother was Josephine Virginia Kessler (Spence). I have an idea that Miriam Eliza Randall is connected with the same family.]

William L. Spence (1845-1902)

 William L. Spence (1845-1902). William was born October 30, 1845 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died November 15, 1902 in Jasper County, Missouri. His wife was Martha Josephine Williams (1859-1946) (13). Their children were:

  1. Carrie Ada Spence (1881-1901).  Carrie was born March 21, 1881, and she died in 1901. I have no additional information about her.
  2. Charles Lewis Spence (1883-1966). Charles was born May 12, 1883 in Quapau, Ottawa, Oklahoma, and he died June 28, 1966 in Miami, Ottawa, Oklahoma. His wife was Lavena Annie Beager (1887-1916). Their children were:
    1. Floyd Eugene Spence (1908-1998)
    2. Beth Spence (b. 1911)
    3. Lois Spence (b. 1912)
    4. Mable Midge Lucille Spence (1913-1991)
    5. Virginia Ruth Spence (1915-2006)
  3. Ethel C. Spence (1885-1958).  Ethel was born February 14, 1885 in Oklahoma, and she died in 1958 in Miami, Ottawa, Oklahoma. Her husband was Guy Collins (b. 1884). Their children were:
    1. Leona M. Collins (b. 1909)
    2. Edith Faye Collins (b. 1911)
  4. James Franklin Spence (1887-1969). James was born June 16, 1887 in Missouri, and he died in 1969 in Miami, Ottawa, Oklahoma. He is buried in the Ottawa Indian Cemetery.
  5. Mary Edna Spence (born 1890).  [She is also listed as Edna Mary Spence] she was born February 17, 1890 in Kansas, and she died July 27, 1975 in Orange County, California. Her husband was Claude Dile Umphenour (1887-1975). Their children were:
    1. Arthur Umphenour (1911-1975).
    2. Clarence Lee Umphenour (1926-2003)
  6. Gary Worren Spence (1892-1985). Guy was born October 20, 1892 in Kansas, and he died July 30, 1985 in LaGrande, Union, Oregon. His wife was Gertrude Wilson (b. 1898). Their children were:
    1. Inez M. Spence (b. 1919).
    2. Lucille Spence (b. 1922)
  7. Nellie Mae Spence (1895-1936). Nellie was born March 3, 1895 in Oklahoma. (Some references state Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas)–and she died May 11, 1936 in Miami, Ottawa, Oklahoma. Their daughter was Juanita Mae Sutton (1923-2000).
  8. William Carl Spence (1899-1900). William was born June 16, 1899, and he died February 14, 1900 in Cherokee County, Kansas.
  9. Betha Spence (born, 1901).  Bertha was born March 8, 1901 in Oklahoma. I have no additional information concerning her. She last appears on the 1920 Census for Ottawa, Oklahoma in her mother’s house.

Mary Jane Spence (born 1848)

Mary Jane Spence was born about 1848 in Missouri. She last appears on the 1865 Census for Wakarusa, Douglas, Kansas (14).

Parmelia (Amelia) Ann Spence (born 1848)

Parmelia was born in 1848 in Missouri. She last appears on the 1860 Census for Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri (15)

 

References

(1) Tennessee Marriage Records about Daniel Spence and Mary “Polly” Pewitt, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2)Missouri Marriage Records about Joel Spence and Martha Jane Hood. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) “Lawrence Massacre: August 21, 1863”. Civil War Article Website. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.us-civilwar.com/massacre.htm

(4) Missouri Marriage Records about Daniel Spence and Mattie Alberta Benschotter, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Missouri Marriage Records about Henry Burr and Nance Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online http://www.ancestry.com

(6)  Missouri Marriage Records about John William Spence and Myrta Alzina Moss. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) 1900 Census, Sapulpa, Creek Nation, Oklahoma about Ida Spence and William Bannister Hickey. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) Missouri Marriage Records about Samuel J. Spence and Sarah Elizabeth Bryant. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) Missouri Marriage Records about Rhoda Spence and James Penix, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) Missouri Marriage Records about Susan Spence and Sam Hood, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) 1850 Census for Jasper County, Missouri about Larkin Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) Missouri Marriage Records for John D. Spence and Martha Copple, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) Missouri Marriage Records for William Spence and Martha J. Williams, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) 1865 Census, Wakarusa, Douglas, Kansas for Mary Jane Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) 1860 Census, Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri for Amelia Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 3 Sept 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Nine: Daniel Spence (1806-1857) and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859)–The Pewitt and Inman Families

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

 

Daniel Spence was born in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1806 to Elisha and Susanna Spencer Spence, and he died in Jasper County, Missouri in 1857.  He was possibly named for the father of Lewis Jones–Daniel Jones–who had relocated to Tennessee before the Spences. The earliest Jasper County, Missouri pioneers are buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery, many of them without tombstones. Such is the case for Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence, Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones, and Daniel and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt Spence.  Their names appear on the pioneer marker at the entrance of the cemetery, along with many others.

Daniel was around four years of age when his family moved from North Carolina to Davidson County, Tennessee in early 1810.  Unlike his older siblings who experienced moving from place to place–this was a completely new experience for young Daniel.  He undoubtedly imagined all sorts of things as they traveled through the woods. After the family settled in Tennessee, young Daniel became adjusted to his new environment.

To date I haven’t found the exact location where the Elisha Spence family settled in Davidson County, Tennessee.  Williamson County was carved from Davidson in 1799, and I believe the Elisha Spence family lived on the border between the two counties. Elisha and his family spent as much time in Williamson as they did in Davidson. Associated families all resided in the  Davidson and Williamson County area.

The move to Tennessee was not without sorrow and precipitated an event that occurred  late summer or early fall in 1810. Elisha and Susannah had a child every year or every other year. When they moved to Tennessee, Susannah had a set of twins born March 28, 1809, and she was pregnant again when they started their journey. The Spences had buried another child born in 1807 or 1808 in North Carolina. That child will be discussed Elisha Spence: Part 11. Susannah’s last child was born late August or early September 1810, and Susannah died in childbirth. The loss of their mother introduced a nanny into the household, a young woman by the name of Mary Jane Bell (1795-1842). She was the daughter of Capt. Robert Bell of Guilford County, North Carolina (1736-1816) and his first wife–Mary Jane Boyd (1754-1795). Jane’s mother had died in childbirth while giving birth to her!

On October 10, 1810, Elisha Spence and Jane Bell were married in Davidson County, Tennessee(1).  The following year, their first child arrived followed by three additional children through 1826. The house became quite crowded and by 1820, the three older children–Samuel, Milly Catherine, and Daniel–relocated to Perry County, Tennessee to live with John David Spencer, one of their mother’s brothers(2). Their other brother, Levi James Spence, had returned to North Carolina and was living in Lenoir County in 1820(3). Samuel became enamored with Elizabeth Inman 1808-1872), daughter of Samuel Inman (1772-1830) and Mary Williams (1774-1830).  They were married in Davidson County, Tennessee on May 10, 1824(4). Milly Catherine had already beaten them to the altar. On February 2, 1820, she married Lewis Jones (1795-1849) in Davidson County, Tennessee(5). Daniel divided his time between the Lewis Jones and Samuel Spence households and finally returned to Davidson County. He had his own conquest to make, and she lived in Williamson County!

The Pewitt Family

Road sign regarding early history of Leipers Fork, Williamson County, Tennessee

Road sign regarding early history of Leiper’s Fork, Williamson County, Tennessee. Sign lists the early pioneer families who settled there.

Two populated places in Williamson County, Tennessee are important to this narrative. The first is Leiper’s Fork, and the second is Fernvale, which was mentioned earlier in the Levi James Spence article. Both places are close to each other, and are also close to Franklin.

According to a Leiper’s Fork, Tennessee Wikipedia entry:

Leiper’s Fork is located along the Natchez Trace, which was an important travel route for Native Americans and early European-American settlers. The area was settled in the late 1700s by settlers from North Carolina and Virginia who had received land grants as payment for service in the American Revolution. Colonel Jesse Steed received a land grant of 2,504 acres (1,013 ha) that includes the site of the village. He sold the area to Jesse Benton, who established a homestead. His son, Thomas Hart Benton, who later was to become U.S. Senator from Missouri, moved the family there in 1801 after his father’s death. Natchez Trace travelers called the community around the Benton homestead Bentontown, but over time the area came to be called Hillsboro.

In 1818, a post office was established in the community. Apparently the Hillsboro name was already in use for a community in Coffee County, so the post office was given the name of Leiper’s Fork for the stream that runs through the village. The namesake of Leiper’s Fork creek was one of two brothers: Hugh Leiper, who completed an early land survey in the area, or Captain James Leiper, who died in the Battle of the Bluffs at Fort Nashborough in 1781.

Growth of the village was stimulated by traffic on the Natchez Trace. Largely as a result of its transportation access, Leiper’s Fork was historically the center of trade for western Williamson County and the center of religious and social activities in the area.

The Leiper’s Fork post office operated until 1918(6).

A highway sign (pictured here) identifies names of the earliest settlers in the area:

Situated on the Natchez Trace, the village and stream were named for pioneer surveyor Hugh Leiper. The Adams, Benton, Bond, Carl, Cummins, Davis, Dobbins, Hunter, Medows, Parham, Southall and Wilkens families were early settlers. Later, the Sweeney, Inman, Locke, Lunn, Mayberry, Martin, Jones and Burdette families lived here. Leipers Fork had a post office from 1818 until 1908, a bank from 1902 until 1932, and a station on the 41.5 mile long Middle Tennessee Railroad from 1909 until 1927. Hillsboro Academy (1890-1904), established by Professor Will Anderson, became a public school in 1905(7).

Fernvale is a populated place where the Harpeth Furnace is located.  There are also a number of cemeteries in the area: Inman Cemetery, which is two miles south of Fernvale,  Bryant Cemetery, which is eighteen miles to the south southwest of Fernvale, Buchanan Cemetery, which is fifteen miles to the East of Fernvale, and Childress cemetery, which is nineteen miles to the east of Fernvale (located in Maury County). There are three Gray Cemeteries: one that is 25 miles to the east of Fernvale (located in Davidson County); one that is seven miles east southeast of Fernvale; and, one (Gray’s Bend) that is located twenty-one miles to the west southwest of Fernvale (located in Hickman County.) A Graham Cemetery is located twenty-two miles to the west of Fernvale in Hickman County. Other names of importance to this narrative include Adams, Alexander (5 cemeteries), Hood, Hughes, Hunter, Jones (there are 10 of those!), Jordan, Martin (6 cemeteries), Moss (2 cemeteries), Russell (2 cemeteries), Smith (5 cemeteries), Taylor (3 cemeteries), Temple (2 cemeteries), Thornton (2 cemeteries), Wall (2 cemeteries), Williams (7 cemeteries), Wilson (4 cemeteries), and others(8).

Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt was born in 1810 in Williamson County, Tennessee to Joel “Jack” Pewitt (1779-1823) and Susannah “Sukey” Adams (1786-1848). Her father’s family came from Lunenburg County, Virginia, while her mother’s family came from Chatham County, North Carolina.

Joel “Jack” Pewitt was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia in 1779, and he died August 13, 1823 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee. He was the son of Joel Pewitt, Sr., who was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia in 1745 and who died in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1797, and Anne Blackwell (1743-1783).  The children of Joel Pewitt, Sr. and Anne Blackwell follow:

  1. Thomas Pewitt (1761/90-unknown). Thomas was born between 1761 and 1790 in Lunenburg, Virginia, and he died in Tennessee. The date of his death is unknown. He may have died young.
  2. John Pewitt (1761/90-1823). John was born between 1761 and 1790 in Lunenburg, Virginia, and he died there in 1823. His wife was Nancy Erskine Crenshaw (b. 1782). Their children were:
      1. Joel B. Pewitt (1814-1889). Joel was born in Virginia, and he died in Humphreys County, Tennessee.  His first wife was Emily Radford (1820-1854). Their children were: (a) William Pettus Pewitt (1841-1926); (b) Columbus A. Pewitt (1844-1922); (c) Thaddeus F. Pewitt (b. 1847); (d) Mary Elizabeth Pewitt (1849-1881); (e) Martha V. Pewitt (b. 1851); (f) Susan A. Pewitt (b. 1854).  His second wife was Mary Jane Coleman (1830-1895). Their children were: (a) Samuel W. Pewitt (b. 1863); (b) Robert Blackwell Pewitt (1865-1932);  (c) Thomas H. Pewitt (b. 1867); (d) Lou Ada Pewitt (1872-1944).
      2. Mary Elizabeth Pewitt (1816-1900). Mary was born March 1816 in Lunenberg, Virginia, and she died after 1900 in Humphreys County, Tennessee. Her husband was John James Russell (b. abt 1818). I haven’t proven this as yet, but I believe John connects with the same Russell family mentioned in the Levi James Spence article. Their children were: (a) Sarah E. Russell (b. 1842); (b) Nancy W. Russell (b. 1845); (c) John Henry Russell (1848-1914); (d) Mary C. Russell (b. 1849); (e) Tabitha Frances Russell (1853-1925); (f) Franklin Pierce Russell (1870-1935).
  3. Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr. (1779-1823). Under discussion here.
  4. Adam Jackson Pewitt (1803-1854). Adam was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1803, and he died January 15, 1854 in Haywood County, Tennessee. His wife was Barbary Smith (1797-1860). Their children were: (a) Andrew J. Pewitt (1833-1910). Andrew relocated to Arkansas and died in Pope County; (b) Wyatt Elliott Pewitt (b. 1839); (c) an unknown child.
  5. James Blackwell Pewitt (1780-1822). James was born in Lunenberg County, Virginia in 1780, and he died May 30, 1822 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He and his brother Joel “Jack” settled together in Williamson County, Tennessee.  His wife was Catherine Andes (1782-1822). Their children were:
    1. Adam Jackson Pewitt (1803-1854). Adam was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1803, and he died in Haywood County, Tennessee on January 15, 1854. His wife was Barbary Smith (1797-1860) Their children were: (a) Andrew J. Pewitt (1833-1910); (b) Wyatt Elliott Pewitt (b. 1839); (c) an unknown child.
    2. Lewis Pewitt (1805-1850). Lewis was born in 1805 in Williamson County, and he died after 1850 in Laclede County, Missouri. His wife was Martha Patsy Cook (b. 1814). Their children were: (a) Catherine Pewett (b. 1833); (b) Martha Jane Pewitt (1835-1916); (c) Adam Pewitt (1837-1840); (d) Nancy Pewitt (1839-1915); (e) Barbary E. Pewitt (b. 1847); (f) Joseph Andes Pewitt (1847-1904); (g) James Pewitt (b. 1850); (h) Lewis E. Pewett (b. 1850); (I) Mary Pewitt (b. 1851); (j) William G. Pewitt (no additional information).
    3. Henry Pewitt (1807-1881). Henry was born May 15, 1807 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died July 22, 1881 in Fulton County, Kentucky. His wife was Rebecca Williamson (1814-1864). Their children were: (a) Barbara L. Pewitt (1828-1856); (b) Hartwell Pewitt (1830-1917); (c) Rev. Malachi Pewitt (1832-1909); (d) Harvey S. “Harry” Pewitt (1834-1899); (e) Minerva (Mauriva) Pewitt (1838-1859); (f) Adam W. Pewitt (1839-1840); (g) William Adam Pewitt (1839-1910); (h) Polly P. Pewitt (1841-1842); (I) Mary Elizabeth Polly Pewitt (1841-1914); (j) James H. Pewitt (1844-1871); (k) Judy W. Pewitt (1846-1847); (l) Rebecca J. Pewitt (1848-1849); (m) Amanda Pewitt (1850-1860). His second wife was Elizabeth Parker (1813-1898)
    4. Anna  Mariah Mae Pewitt (1808-1885). She was born in Tennessee. I have no additional information about her.
    5. James Pewitt (1809-1854). James was born September 2, 1809 in Tennessee, and he died January 15, 1854 in Williamson County, Tennessee. His wife was Sarah Adams (1808-1866). They had a daughter: Sarah Jane Pewitt (1839-1890).
    6. John Andes Pewitt (1812-1890). John was born January 12, 1812 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee, and he died in 1890 in Sand Mountain, Bibb County, Alabama. His wife was Rebecca Elizabeth Givens (1817-1874). Their children were: (a) Mary Ann Polly Pewitt (1838-1889); (b) Adam Pewitt (1839-1910); (c) Thomas Pewitt (1842-1862); (d) Sarah Francis Pewitt (1843-1904); (e) George Martin Pewitt (1846-1910); (f) Judy A. Pewitt (1847-1923); (g) Jeremiah Samuel “Jerry” Pewitt (1851-1931); (h) James Martin Pewitt (1852-1933); (I) Nancy C. Pewitt (1858-1940).
    7. Barbara Pewitt (1814-1887). Barbara was born February 9, 1814 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and she died October 18, 1887 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee. Her first marriage was to her first cousin: Joseph Pewitt (1810-1840). Joseph was a son of Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr (1779-1823) and Susannah Suckey Adams (1786-1848) and a brother of Mary Ann Polly Pewitt (1810-1859)–the wife of Daniel Spence. Their children were: (a) Mary E. Pewitt (1826-1887); (b) Mary Ann Pewitt (1830-1887) [Note: there may have been two Marys, or this may be one person with different dates of birth]; (c) Joseph Pewitt (b. 1831); (d) Catherine Susan Pewitt (1831-1880); (e) Adeline Pewitt (b. 1833); (f) William Maxfield Pewitt (1835-1865); (g) Minerva B. Pewitt (1837-1860); (h) Cora Pewitt (b. 1840); (I) Fanny Pewitt (b. 1840). Barbara’s second marriage was to Granville Grantz Inman (1820-1902). He was the son of John Lazarus Inman (1793-1859) and Sarah Kirby (1795-1870); the grandson of  Lazarus Inman (1765-1850) and Susannah Stovall (1765-1850); and the great grandson of Meshach Inman (1749-1771) of the Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego Inman fame. [I’ve already discussed this Inman family in Part Three of the Elisha Spence series: The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family.  This Inman family will reappear shortly.] The children of Barbara Pewitt and Granville Grantz Inman were: (a) James Wesley Inman (1843-1898); (b) Sarah J. Inman (1844-1914); (c) Nancy C. Inman (b. 1846); (d) Henry Clay Inman (b. 1846); (e) Barbara Ann (or Allen) Inman (1849-1908); (f) John T. Inman (1851-1934); (g) Adam A. Inman (1853-1929); (h) Minerva Inman (b. 1860); (I) Monroe S. Inman (1860-1897).  After Barbara’s death, Granville married Catherine Pyner (1818-1897).James Blackwell Pewitt (1780-1822). James settled in Williamson County, Tennessee with his brother, Joel “Jack.” He was born in Lunenberg, Virginia in 1780, and he died May 30, 1822 in Williamson County, Tennessee. (Before I go any further, I will be citing a document that can cause a problem if you don’t probe into it. It is called Tennessee Divorce and Other Records (1800-1965). It is actually a collection of many different types of records including divorce and probate. The records I needed were all probate records.  There is one divorce I will discuss later on in this article, but it is the only divorce I am aware of.)  James’ wife was Catherine Andes (1782-1822). Their children were:
      1. Hartwell Pewitt (1785-1843). Hartwell was born about 1785 in Lunenberg, Virginia, and he died in 1843 in Monroe County, Arkansas. His wife was Edney/Edna Halstead Gray (1785-1835).  Their children were: (a) Ephraim Pewitt (b. 1817); (b) Calvin Pewitt (b. 1819); (c) Rebecca Pewitt (b. 1821); (d) Amanda Pewitt (1824-1855); (e) Eveline/Evaline Pewitt (1829-1852); (f) Mary Elizabeth Pewitt (1835-1878). [Note: Edna Gray was from the same Gray line depicted in the Levi James Spence article. She was a sister of Daniel Gray, who is discussed in the next section.)
      2. Nancy Pewitt (1788-1874). Nancy was born in Lunenberg, Virginia in 1788, and she died in Bastrop, Texas in 1874. Her husband was Daniel Gray (1787-1848). [Note: This is the same Gray family depicted in the Levi James Spence article. Daniel was a brother of Edna Gray, who married Hartwell Pewitt (see previous section). Daniel and Edna Gray were children of Deliverance Gray (1767-1840) and Palmer Tamer Koen Halstead (1760-1788). Deliverance was a son of Anthony Gray (1750-1803/4) and Polly Jordan 1754-1804), and a grandson of Nathaniel Dwight Gray (1744-1777) and Mary Jane Parker (1744-1799).] The children of Nancy Pewitt and Daniel Gray were: (a) John Wesley Gray (1812-1854); (b) Joshua Gray (1814-1836); (c) Ann Blackwell Gray (b. 1818); (d) Rebecca Gray (1822-1850); (e) Joseph Leonard Gray (1824-1863); (f) Sarah W. Gray (b. 1827); (g) Mary Jane Gray (1832-1855).

Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr. (1779-1823), Susannah “Suckey” Adams (1786-1848) and the Inman Family

In the early-to-mid 1990s, I traveled back and forth to Denver aboard a local bus. This was during the period of time prior to the availability of Echo Passes for the Express and Regional busses. I didn’t mind the locals. The trip took much longer than the Express, but it was during this period of time when I did a lot of reading. One book I remember in particular was called The Civil War in Missouri (1861-1865) or something similar to that title.  After finding the surname Inman in the index, I checked out the book from the campus library and focused on the entry.

According to the footnote, an incident took place outside Houston in Texas, County, Missouri concerning a bushwhacker by the name of John Inman. The Union Army wanted to capture him and eventually caught him near Houston. That night, John Inman escaped, and Union soldiers shot and killed him.

Well, of course the name intrigued me. And during my next trip to the library, I discovered a number of Inmans resided in Texas and in Dent Counties, Missouri . I thought they may have been related to my third great grandmother, Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872), wife of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859). But if so, how?

Only recently did I discover my answer!

Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr. (1779-1823) was born in Lunenberg County, Virginia in 1779, and he died August 13, 1823 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee. As already noted, he was a son of Joel Pewitt (1745-1797) and Anne Blackwell (1743-1797). His wife was Susannah Suckey Adams (1786-1848). She was the daughter of Thomas A. Adams (1755-1823) and Sarah Anna Vaughn (1755-1806). The children of Joel and Susannah Adams Pewitt follow:

  1. Winna Pewitt (b. 1804). Winna was born in 1804 in Williamson County, Tennessee. She died at an unknown date in Williamson County.
  2. Thomas Pewitt (1806-1847). Thomas was born in 1806 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1847 in Lawrence County, Arkansas. His wife was Tryphenia Thania Smith (1805-1832). Their children were: (a) John Smith Pewitt (1831-1864); (b) Elizabeth S. Pewitt (b. 1833); (c) Mary Ann Pewitt (b. 1834); (d) Nancy M. Pewett (b. 1838); (e) Tryphenia I Pewitt (b. 1840); (f) Thomas I. Pewitt (b. 1843); (g) Permilia Pewitt (1846-1938).
  3. James Pewitt (1809-1854). James was born in Tennessee September 2, 1809, and he died In Williamson County, Tennessee January 15, 1854. His wife was Sarah Adams (1808-1866). They had one known daughter:  Sarah Jane Pewitt (1839-1890).
  4. Joseph Pewitt (1810-1840). He was discussed in the James Blackwell Pewitt section since he married James’ daughter, Barbara.
  5. Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859). (If the birth dates are correct, she and her brother, Joseph, were twins.) Wife of Daniel Spence (1806-1857). They will be discussed in Part 10.
  6. Nancy M. Pewitt (1814-1869). Nancy was born in 1814 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and she died about 1869 in Dent County, Missouri. Her husband was Henry C. Duke (1812-1870). Their children were: (a) Malachi Duke (b. 1833); (b) Emily Duke (b. 1837); (c) Robert Duke (b. 1839); (d) Susannah Duke (b. 1842); (e) William Duke (b. 1844); (f) Lavinia Duke (b. 1848).
  7. Malachi Pewitt (1816-1882). Malachi was born in Williamson County, Tennessee July 12, 1816, and he died October 25, 1882 in Dry Fork, Dent County, Missouri. His wife was Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Inman (1820-1854). She was a daughter of Ezekiel Inman (1796-1862) and Lillis Hester Edgar (1798-1873), a granddaughter of Lazarus Inman (1765-1850) and Susannah Stovall (1765-1850),  a great granddaughter of Meshach Inman (1749-1771), and a sister of Annis (Annas) Inman (1832-1855), who married Laban Pewitt (1821-1869). The children of Malachi Inman and Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Inman were: (a) William Washington Pewitt (1837-1919); (b) Sousanah  Malinda Pewitt (1839-1871); (c) Nancy Jane Pewitt (1842-1935); (d) Joel Pewitt (b. 1845). Malachi’s second wife was Juretta Catherine Medlock (1833-1900). Their children were: (a) David Pewitt, born 1856; (b) Mary Albertine “Tina” Pewitt (1866-1941); (c) James H. Pewitt (1868-1928); (d) Lillian Amberzine Pewitt (1870-1930); (e) John S. Pewitt (b. 1873); (f) Silas Luther Pewitt (1875-1929); (g) Josaphine I. Pewitt (1879-1935); (h) Laborn (Laban) Pewitt–nothing else is known; (I) Martha Pewitt–nothing else is known.
  8. Laban Pewitt (1821-1869). Laban was born about 1821 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died in September 1869 in Dent County, Missouri. His first wife was Annis (Annas) Inman (1832-1855)–mentioned in the previous entry. They had one son: Wiley Pewitt, born 1849. Laban’s second wife was Sarah Jane Wolford (1832-1864).
  9. Wiley W. Pewitt (1822-1864). Wiley was born in 1822 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died November 1864. He is buried in the Mount Hermon Vet Memorial Cemetery, Dent County, Missouri. His wife was Mary Elizabeth Birchlew (1826-1887). Their children were: (a) Laban Pewitt (1844-1862)–he died during the Civil War while serving in the Confederate Army; (b) Susannah “Susan” E. Pewitt (1847-1895); (c) Thomas J. Pewitt, born 1849; (d) Virginia A. Pewitt (1851-1924); (e) Lorenzo Dow Pewitt (1853-1891); (f) Amberzine Tennessee “Ammie” Pewitt (1855-1939); (g) James B. Pewitt (1857-1944); (h) Joel Price Pewitt (1862-1920); (I) William Wiley “Will” Pewitt (1864-1892).

The Missouri Inman Bushwhacker vs. The Tennessee Inman Scoundrel

 In  May 2002, Howard and I were returning to Colorado after a trip to the Midwest. We stopped in the town of Houston in Texas County, Missouri where I took front and rear pictures of a pioneer sign. I was still seeking the identity of a bushwhacker by the name of John Inman who was killed near Houston while trying to escape federal forces. Shortly after that, I discontinued my search–an interest that only rekindled during the writing of this article.  I began wondering whether anyone else had searched for  this John Inman and ran across an article I wrote in an old issue of Inman Innings. At that time, I was also looking for information on my husband’s Grogan line:

Just the other day, I received a query on-line. I am publishing it with the writer’s permission. I had put out an announcement on Tennessee Roots, North & South Carolina Roots, and Mid-Plains Roots on the Internet concerning my forthcoming Spence book. The writer saw my maiden name and sent this message, hoping that someone could provide an answer:

“When I first started researching, I thought Grogan was going to be my easiest family to trace but I found it more difficult than I thought. I have sent for a copy of my grandfather’s death certificate, and I am hoping it will have his mother’s first name on it. That will help with the Inman side and hopefully we will be able to make a connection.
 
I also heard from someone in Texas County, Missouri who told me where to write for information on the Grogans there. I hope I can find T. J. (Jeff) Grogan”s parents. I did find a Thomas Jefferson Grogan at the family History Center at the LDS Church, but I’m not sure it is the right one or if his name is Thomas Jefferson.
 
About Inman as a bushwhacker: it could be my great grandmother’s family. J. T. Jeff Grogan was married twice. His first marriage may have been to Cynthia Stephens 07 Mar 1872 in Clay County, Tennessee, but I haven’t confirmed that. He had two children from that first marriage–John Tom and Martha, I believe. His second marriage was to _______ Inman, and they had four children, including my grandfather, born in 1881, Charles Henry Grogan in Grogan, Cass Township, Texas County, Missouri. So he could have married the Inman there in Texas County. At least that makes the family history a little exciting.”
An earlier message from this correspondent reads:
 
“I don’t have any Spence families, but in reading your query, I noticed your maiden name and thought since you were a genealogist as well as an Inman, I might hit it lucky. Please forgive the length of this query.
 
My great-grandfather, Cleo Patrick ‘Tobe” Aaron (b. 1863 AL), married my great-grandmother, Margaret Wood Tomlinson in 1888 in Dunklin County, Missouri. The Aaron family were making their way to Texas and stopped in Dunklin county long enough “to make a crop” and–as it turned out–long enough for Tobe to meet and marry Margaret. The marriage didn’t last. Shortly after my grandmother was born (December 1889), the Aarons were divorced. Tobe moved on to northeastern Texas to rejoin his family. In October 1896 in Fannin County, Texas he married Lula Morris. He died there in 1959. Except for his name, I knew nothing about Cleo Patrick “Tobe” Aaron until I started searching two years ago. I found him in the Mormon Ancestral File. Three marriages were listed for him–the two I have mentioned AND a marriage to someone named D. INMAN. There is absolutely no other information. I located Tobe’s present-day family and asked them. Apparently Tobe had kept his marriages to my great-grandmother and to this D. Inman a secret for many years. And because his wife was so upset when she found out, his other marriages were never discussed.
 
Now his granddaughter is as curious as I am about who D. Inman is. My guess is that she was living either in Texas or in the Indian Territory, although it is also possible that she lived in Colorado (one of Tobe’s brothers had checked out the Mormon settlement in Manassa in the early 1890s). The marriage would have taken place between 1890 and 1896.”

I will explain the John Inman–bushwhacker question since it was an issue that I originally raised.

Last fall, I was doing a considerable amount of research concerning the border wars between Missouri and Kansas during the Civil War. I ran across an account (source misplaced at the moment) describing the execution of a “notorious” bushwhacker named John Inman by Union forces in Texas County, Missouri. As I recall, John Inman and another bushwhacker were first captured by the Union Army and were being held prisoner.  Inman and the other bushwhacker attempted to escape and were killed while running. Since discovering that information, I have been trying to discover the identity of John Inman and his possible connection to the Tennessee Inman families, from whom I descend. Texas County, Missouri is some distance from Jasper County, but location does not decide relationship as far as families are concerned.

A trip to the local library disclosed a John Inman living in Texas County on the 1850 Census. However, I don’t know whether this was the same John Inman–alleged bushwhacker. So I placed a query on the Internet, and the response was really surprising–not concerning John Inman, but another relative. I heard from a man who had done a considerable amount of research concerning Missouri bushwhackers who rode with Quantrill, Bloody Bill Anderson, and some of the others. He said that he would check his research and get back in touch with me. A few days later, he sent me a complete listing of all the known bushwhackers in Missouri, including the leader under whom they served. As I recall, his comment went something like this: “Couldn’t find your John Inman, but I’m sure you’ll find another name you mentioned (chuckle): ‘The other name: James Bunch–my ggg uncle who married Milly Catherine Spence, my ggg aunt, in Jasper County, Missouri.’ Allegedly, he rode with Quantrill!” (I knew that my James Bunch was head of a Confederate Home Guard Unit in Jasper County, and I remember my grandfather describing him as “a Confederate guerilla fighter,” but until I saw this list, I didn’t know how extensively he was involved. No doubt, that is the reason the Bunch family and my ggg grandmother, Elizabeth Inman Spence, fled Missouri after the Civil War and went down into Texas).

I am still in a quandary about John Inman, however. As I recall, the source suggested that many men were falsely accused of bushwhacking as an excuse for killing them simply because their sympathies remained with the South. This may have been true of John Inman.

Hopefully, someone will have the answer to this question(9).

The Inman Innings article was written in 1996. Since then I learned Quantrill’s  James Bunch lived in Northern Missouri and was not the James Bunch who headed the Confederate Home Guard Unit in Jasper County, Missouri.  And I believe I have identified John Inman the bushwhacker’s family. He did not come from the Dent County Inmans who intermarried with the Pewitts. He was part of the Texas County Inmans who descended from the South Carolina Inmans. Their Inman line was in Charleston at an early date. They moved up through the Carolina back country and settled in Tennessee.  My southern Inman line and their cousins in Dent County originally settled in Maryland and moved to North Carolina. From there, they moved to Williamson County, Tennessee. I do not believe the Dent County Inmans or the Houston County Inmans were directly related.

Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt and Daniel Spence settled in Jasper County, Missouri with Spence and Jones relatives. Some of Polly’s siblings intermarried with Elizabeth Inman Spence’s cousins and settled in Dent County, Missouri. The Dent County people supported the South during the Civil War. Daniel Spence and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt’s family supported the North. There does not appear to be any interaction between the two groups. As will be shown in the next article (Elisha Spence, Part 10), some of Daniel and Polly’s children fled to Kansas during the Civil War, and several of them stayed there.

A mystery resolved for the moment concerning the identity of a Missouri Inman bushwhacker! Now for the Tennessee Inman scoundrel!

Hezekiah W. Inman (a/k/a Hezekiah Haney) (1770-1847).

Hezekiah W. Inman was a brother of my fourth great grandfather, Samuel Inman (1772-1830)–therefore, my fifth great uncle, and an uncle of my third great grandmother, Elizabeth Inman Spence (1808-1872)–wife of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859). I didn’t mention his extra-curricular activities in The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family, but I am doing so here since they tie in indirectly with the Spences and the Pewitts.

Hezekiah had two families at the same time. His first wife was Christiana/Christina Spears (1774-1840), whom he married in 1793 in Halifax County, North Carolina and by whom he had five children. Approximately two years after the marriage, Hezekiah began an affair with Nancy “Blancy” Devine a/k/a Christiana/Christina Spears Haney Murphree (1780-1845), by whom he had five additional children. He moved to Williamson County, Tennessee with his first family and then traveled back and forth between Tennessee and North Carolina.  According to a note on my tree:

In 1805, Hezekiah left his family and moved to Anson, North Carolina, where he lived under the name Hezekiah Haney. He was living with Nancy Devine, who used the name Christina/Christiana Spears(10).

His legal wife Christiana divorced  him in 1814 after she discovered his double life. She also learned he was scheming to get his hands on a parcel of real estate her father had left her in his will. The court ruled in Christiana’s favor following testimony from one of Hezekiah’s cousins, Lazarus Inman, per the following:

1C. Inman   v.   H. Inman______________ Petition for a Divorce______________ Filed 6th October 1814

 2 To the Honorable the Judge of the Fourth Judicial Court the petition of Christina Inman who is and for several years has been a citizen of Tennessee by her next friend Lazarus Inman respectfully represents that about twenty years ago she intermarried with a certain Hezikiah Inman in the State of North Carolina, by whom she had five children, four of whom are still living. Your petitioner further shows that, about seven years ago the said Hezikiah Inman who is made defendant hereto, entirely abandoned your petitioner and her children, in Williamson County in this state and has ever since lived in open adultery with another woman named Nancy Divine by whom he has several children. Your petitioner has not since the Defendant abandoned her received any real assistance from him towards supporting herself and her children, but has been obliged to rely on her own labor for that purpose. Our petitioner represents, that her father has lately in about three months past departed this life leaving a small property to a part of which your petitioner is entitled. The defendant is endeavoring to get possession thereof and convert it to his own use. Your petitioner states that the defendant is in possession and owner of considerable property, a part of which ought to be allowed as alimony to her but he refused to make any such provision. Your petitioner therefore prays that she may be by order of this Court be divorced entirely from said defendant and may afford such
 

 3 alimony be allowed to your petitioner as to this Honorable Court may appear reasonable and just and in the mean time may the defendant be injoined from receiving or recovering any parts of her late deceased fathers estate and may also such other further relief be granted in the premises as is just.             /s/ Grundy Schulse (?)  State of Tenneessee to wit:This day personally appeared before me Thomas Stuart one of the Judges of the Circuit courts for the State of Tennessee Christina Inman the petitioner in the above petition and made oath that the facts stated in the above petition are true to the best of her knowledge and belief and that she does not pray this divorce out of ___ity nor is the application made by collusion between her and her said husband, for the mere purpose of being free and separated from each other, but is made by her in sincerity and truth for the causes stated in the above petitioner. Sworn to and subscribed before me this 4th day of October  

her/s/ Thos. Stuart                                                                                 Christina    X    Inman                                                                                                                            mark The Clerk of the Circuit court of Williamson County. Let a subpoena under seal of the court be issued to summon the above named Hezekiah Inman to appear at next Circuit court to be held in Williamson County, and answer the above petition. Also let a writ of Injunction be issued agreeably to the prayer of the above petition. Given under my hand to seal this 4th day of October 1814. Thos Stuart one of the Judged of the Circuit Court.{seal}

 3 (sic) C Inman                                                                                     }v.         }           subp                                                                                    }           to answerH. Inman___________ 9th October 1814 ___________ Came to hand10th October 1814 Not found /s/ Wm Hu___________(11).

Lazarus Inman (1765-1850) was a son of Meshach Inman (1749-1771) and the husband of Susannah Stovall (1765-1850). As already noted, some of their children and grandchildren intermarried with the Pewitts and resettled in Dent County, Missouri. No doubt the Inman descendants from Lazarus Inman knew about Hezekiah’s antics–a person they probably discussed from time to time. These stories would also pass down through the Spence and Pewitt lines until reaching the “Well-we-don’t-talk-about-that!” Stage!)

In 1824, Hezekiah married Eliza A. Branch (1803-1897) in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he had two additional children by her. His first wife wasn’t about to take him back, and his situation with Nancy Devine undoubtedly ended when he couldn’t get his way about Christiana’s property. He lived in Wayne County, Tennessee in 1830(12) and in 1836(13) and by 1840, he and his family relocated to Marshall, Mississippi(14).

Hezekiah died in Marshall County, Mississippi before September 1847.

(To Be Continued in  Elisha Spence: Part 10–The Children of Daniel Spence and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt)

 

 

References

(1) Tennessee State Marriages about Elisha Spence and Jane Bell. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) 1820 Census for Perry ,Tennessee about John Spencer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) 1820 Census for Lenoir County, North Carolina about Levi Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Tennessee State Marriages about Samuel Spence and Elizabeth Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Tennessee State Marriages about Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) “Leiper’s Fork” from the Wikipedia site. Article last updated 1 Oct 2014. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leiper%27s_Fork,_Tennessee

(7) Inscription on the Leiper’s Fork Historical Road Sign, Williamson County, Tennessee.

(8) Roadside Thoughts Website: Fernvale, Tennessee. Page Last Modified by John Hall: 9 Aug 2015. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://roadsidethoughts.com/tn/fernvale-xx-williamson-cemeteries.htm

(9) Barbara Inman Beall, Editor. “A Grogan-Inman Problem”, Inman Innings, Vol. 2, No. 2. Spring 1996.

(10) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) Tennessee Divorce and Other Papers (1800-1965), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) 1830 Census for Wayne County, Tennessee about Hezekiah Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) Early Tennessee Tax Records about Hezekiah Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) 1840 Census for Marshall County, Mississippi about Hezekiah Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

 

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Seven: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and Lewis Jones (1795-1849)

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Milly Catherine Spence was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, and she died at Fidelity, Jasper County, Missouri November 30, 1875. On February 2, 1820, Milly Catherine Spence married Lewis Jones (1795-1849) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Lewis was a son of Daniel Jones (1767-1815) and Sarah “Sallie” Bassett (1769-1837). He was born December 25, 1795 in Franklin County, Virginia, and he died in 1849 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri. I have already detailed the connection of the Daniel Jones family line with the Pasquotank County, North Carolina Jones families in “Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part One: Setting the Stage”. So I won’t repeat it here. However, a third Jones family will connect with the marriage of Lewis and Milly Catherine’s oldest daughter.

The children of Daniel Jones and Sallie Bassett follow:

1. John Jones (1788-aft.1817). As noted in an earlier article, John was appointed administrator of David Spence’s estate in October 1815 in Davidson County, Tennessee(1). David Spence (1786-1814) was a half brother of Elisha Spence and the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Judah Perry (1748-1795). David Spence’s estate closed November 16, 1817(2). After that, John Jones disappears from the records. I do not know whether he ever married.

2. Ollie Bassett Jones (1789-1873). Ollie was born in 1797 in North Carolina, and she died July 10, 1873 in Fernvale, Williamson County, Tennessee. On November 28, 1809, Ollie married Samuel Smith (1786-1850) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) James L. Smith (1810-1868); (b) Sarah “Sallie” Smith (1812-1895); (c) Nancy Smith (b. 1816)–she may not have survived; (d) Daniel Jones Smith (1816-1868); (e)Samuel Smith (1823-1892); (f) Abraham “Abram” Smith (1826-1914); (g) Amelia “Millie” Ann Smith (1828-1902); (h) James Smith (1829-1850); (i)Ollie Emaline Smith (1832-1917); (j) George Smith (b. 1836); (k) Willie Smith–no additional information. A portion of a road sign commemorating Fernvale reads as follows:

“In 1819, Samuel and Ollie Jones Smith settled along the South Harpeth River near the sulphur springs… Other historic families include Allen, Beasely, Givens, Harrison, Hughes, Inman, Ivy, Jones, King, Kirby, Page, Pewitt, Sullivan and White.”

3. Lewis Jones (1795-1849). Under discussion here.

4. James B. Jones (1797-1870). James was born November 21, 1797 in Tennessee, and he died January 20, 1870 in Newton County, Missouri. On September 8, 1821, he married Charlotte T. Greer (1803-1877) in Davidson County, Tennessee. This marriage is another connection to the third Jones family. Their children were: (a) Rachel Emeline Jones (1824-1861); (b) George Jones (b. 1831); (c) Mary Ann Jones (b. 1835); James Jones (b. 1838); and William Jones (1840-1882).

5. Nancy Jones (1801-1879). Nancy was born January 20, 1801 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died June 1879 in Davidson County, Tennessee. On March 4, 1820, she married Christopher Butts (1788-1870) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) Lyda Butts, b.1817–Christopher may have had an earlier marriage; (b) James M. Butts (1828-1870); (c) Ollie E. Butts (1828-1899); (d) Parmelia Butts, b. 1831; (e) Daniel Butts, b. 1834; (f) Elizabeth Butts (1838-1913); (g) Christopher M. Butts, b. 1841.

6. Elizabeth Jones, b. 1808 in Tennessee. She may have died young.

***

The Family of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Jones

Lewis Jones appears on the 1820 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, dated January 4, 1820(1). A woman his mother’s age appears in the household along with some younger brothers and sisters. He lives in the same neighborhood as John David Spencer where Samuel and Daniel Spence lived. Lewis and Milly were married in Davidson County, Tennessee on February 2, 1820(2). A woman Milly Catherine’s age appears in the Elisha Spence household in 1820(3). The enumeration date is August 7, 1820. That would have been after her marriage. She may have returned home to help her step-mother with the children for a while, especially if Lewis was away or if there was an illness in the family. By 1830, the Lewis Jones family had returned to Davidson County(4).

The children of Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones were:

1. Rebecca Jones (1820-1867). Rebecca was born in 1820 in Tennessee, and she died in 1867, probably in Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri. I haven’t found the exact location of her death as yet. She married Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859) on January 17, 1839 in Barry County, Missouri(5). This is marriage united two Jones families, thus connecting a third Jones family into this lineage. I will discuss that family in a separate section. Their children follow:

a. James H. Jones (1844-1920). James was born in January 1844 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died after 1920 in Philipsburg, Granite, Montana. His wife was Rosa “Rosie” McKelby (1850-1920), whom he married in Jasper County, Missouri January 14, 1880. They had one daughter: Sarah Alice Jones, born 1896.

b. John Lewis Jones (1846-1929). John was born February 12, 1846 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri, and he died October 7, 1929 in Missoula, Montana. He married Henrietta Andrus (1846-1945) in 1874 in Washinton, Utah. They had a number of children: (a) Louis Henry Jones (1876-1880); (b) Lillie May Jones (1877-1900); (c) George Wilford Jones (1878-1955); (d) James Andrew Jones (1880-1909); (e) Emma Jones (1886-1900); (f) Anna “Annie” Rebecca Jones (1886-1965); (g) Myrtle Jones (1888-1900); (h) Nellie Irma “Oma” Jones (1889-1978); (i) Grover Cleveland Jones (1891-1963); (j) Randolph Jones (1892-1900); (k) Thomas Lewis Jones (1899-1908); (l) Irma Jones–no information.

c. George Washington Jones (1848-1887). George was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1848, and he died after 1887 in Jasper County, Missouri. His wife was Armanda Elizabeth Murphy (1853-1935), whom he married March 20, 1887 in Carterville, Jasper, Missouri.

d. Daniel Greenbury Jones (1851-1924). Daniel was born August 17, 1851 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died October 4, 1924 in Covina, Los Angeles County, California. His wife’s name appears on the records both as Mary Margaret Hicks (1856-1900) and as Martha M. Hicks. They were married March 27, 1873 in Jasper County, Missouri. There children were: (i) Arthur Alvin Jones (1874-1966); (ii) Oliver Wendell Jones (1875-1961); (iii) Elsie Pearl Jones (1877-1880); (iv) Newell Elton Jones (1879-1914); (v) Tillie Lois Jones (1880-1961); (vi) William Jack Jones (1885-1919); (vii) James W. Jones (b. 1888); (viii) Beulah Hester Jones (1893-2000); (ix) Olive Marie Jones (1896-1924).

Some people have suggested a Lorella Jones as a member of this family. She appears to have been born in Illinois, so she would not have been a member of this family. Her date of birth was 1851, so she would have been a twin of Daniel Greenbury Jones. He was born in Jasper County, Missouri.

***

2. Sarah Zane Jones (1823-1862). Sarah was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1823, and she died April 5, 1862 in Jasper County, Missouri. She married William Newton Warren (1820-1883) at Jones Creek, Jasper County, Missouri. He would become Captain William Newton Warren, C.S.A. during the Civil War. Their children were:

a. Lewis E. Warren (1842-1902). Lewis was born December 2, 1842 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died February 28, 1902 in Texas. He is buried with family members in the Prairie Springs Cemetery, Cross Timber, Johnson County, Texas. He appears to have never married.

b. Daniel Columbus Warren (1844-1926). Daniel was born March 28, 1844 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died June 22, 1926 in Joshua, Johnson County, Texas. In Summer 1862, Daniel enlisted in the Missouri Troop Infantry, Company A, 11th Regiment, Parson’s Brigade, Confederate Army in Neosho, Newton County, Missouri, and he served until the end of the war(6). He married Mary Etter (b. 1857) in Johnson County, Texas on July 3, 1876. She had a son named Neil, and it appears that Daniel adopted him.

c. Thomas Benton Warren (1846-1922). (Thomas Benton Warren has been confused with a John Thomas Warren (1844-1922) with the Benton name inserted. This is the correct Thomas!) Thomas was born February 25, 1846 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died December 25, 1922 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. He did not fight in the Civil War. His wife was Rosanna Catherine Josephine Gant (1855-1911), whom he married in 1873, probably in Texas. Their children were: (i) James Edward Warren (1875-1956); (ii) Ninetta Warren (b. 1877); (iii) Pettie Warren (b. 1878); (iv) William Newton Warren (1880-1962); (v) Perna/Capurnia Z. Warren (1883-1961); (vi) Bessie Warren (b. 1885); (vii) Millie Olya Warren (1888-1975).

d. Elizabeth J. Warren (1848-1913). Elizabeth was born August 12, 1848 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and she died August 24, 1913 in Johnson County, Texas. She married George Washington Bransom in 1870 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas. Their children were: (i) Benjamin W. Bransom (1871-1894); (ii) Mary T. Bransom (1873-1892); (iii) James Allen Bransom (1876-1963); (iv) Samuel H. Bransom (1878-1891); (v) Mittie M. Bransom (1879-1912); (vi) Ida Daisy Bransom (1879-1964); (vii) Charles Otis Bransom (1882-1883); (viii) Effie I. Bransom (b. 1884); (ix) Robert Gus Bransom (1886-1976); (x) George Edward Bransom (1886-1976); (xi) WK Bransom–no information.

e. Melinda Ann “Millie” Warren (1850-1938). Millie was born October 23, 1850 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died February 14, 1938 in Joshua, Johnson County, Texas. On September 10, 1868, she married Asbury Franklin Eddleman (1843-1932) in Johnson County, Texas. He was a private Company C, 10th Texas Regiment, C.S.A.(7). Their children were: (i) William D. Eddleman (1869-1869); (ii) James Franklin Eddleman (1871-1957); (iii) Thomas Wesley Eddleman (1872-1947); (iv) Columbus Edward Eddleman (1875-1963); (v) Grace Edith Eddleman (1878-1921); (vi) Ettie Zane Eddleman (1883-1966); (vii) Reginald Newton Eddleman (1885-1980); (viii) Earl Homer Eddleman (1891-1974).

f. Ketirah or Keturah Warren (b. 1853, Jasper County, Missouri.) Nothing else is known.

g. Robert Newton Warren (1855-1929). Robert was born March 15, 1855 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died January 29, 1929 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. His wife was Adelia Pearce (1873-1964), whom he married June 29, 1898. They had one daughter: Mable Warren (1899-1989).

h. Mary Ann Warren (1857-1938). Mary Ann was born January 24, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died September 30, 1938 in Mineral Well, Palo Pinto, Texas. She married Matthew Russell Birdwell (1854-1932) in 1875 or early 1876. They had two children: (i) John William Birdwell (1876-1953); and Bessie Ethel Birdwell (1877-1953).

i. Henry C. Warren (b. 1859, Jasper County, Missouri). He may have died young. I could find nothing more.

j. Sarah L. Warren. I have no more information other than her name(8).

Sarah Zane Jones Warren died in Jasper County, Missouri in 1862 and was probably buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery. Shortly after her death, her husband married Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890) in Jasper County, Missouri. Nancy’s brother was Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859), the husband of Sarah Jane’s older sister, Rebecca. The third Jones family will be discussed in the next article.

Some people place a Lewis M. Warren (1841-1875) in this family as the oldest son. He was born in 1841 in Missouri, and he died in 1875 in Christian County, Missouri. If this were true, the Warrens would have had two sons named Lewis in the first and second position. After researching the matter, I believe I have discovered the identity of Lewis M. Warren. His surname was originally Park. His widowed mother, Nancy Warren, appears on the 1850 Census for Franklin County, Missouri with the following children: Robert Warren (b. 1835); Jane Warren (b. 1837); Ephraim Warren (b. 1839); Lewis Warren (1842-1875); Martha Warren (b. 1846)(9). Further inspection of the records shows that on September 16, 1847, Nelson Warren married Mrs. Nancy Park in Franklin County, Missouri(10). Nelson Warren may have died before the 1850 Census. I don’t know what happened to Nancy Park Warren. She may have remarried, or she may have died after the 1850 Census. Lewis M. Warren served in the Union Army for three years during the Civil War–another factor disconnecting him from the William Newton Warren family(11),(12). The William Newton Warren family–solidly Confederate–relocated to Texas in 1865 after the Union Army entered Missouri. This story is found in Mary Ann Warren’s Obituary:

Mrs. Mary Birdwell, 81, who as a child fled with her mother to Texas on an ox-drawn wagon when invading Yankee troops drove families of Confederate soldiers out of her native Missouri in 1865, died here early early Friday night, following an extended illness.

The wife of the late Matthew R. Birdwell, former cattleman who halped drive marauding Indians from this section, Mrs. Birdwell lived here more than fifty years.

She was the daughter of the late William N. Warren, a former State Representative in Missouri, who served in the Confederate Army as a Captain. Twenty-seven wagons crowded with wives and children of Confederate soldiers, were in the train in which she rode to Texas. Her family stopped in Grayson County, where they remained until the war ended and Captain Warren could join them and in the spring of 1866 they moved to Johnson County where her father settled on a tract of land near Burleson…(13).

Lewis M. Warren did not go to Texas. On February 13, 1866, he married Sarah Jane Adams (1836-1916) in Lincoln County, Kentucky(14). By 1870, he and his family settled in Clay, Greene County, Missouri(15). Lewis died in Christian County, Missouri May 4, 1875(16). His children were: James Charles Warren (1866-1943); Rebecca Frances Warren (1869-1951); Sarah Jane “Sadie” Warren (1871-1957); Mary “Mollie” Warren (1873-1944); Lewis Thomas Warren (1876-1951). He was not a child of William Newton Warren and Sarah Zane Jones.

William Newton Warren and Tennessee Jones had the following children:

a. Amelia Warren, who was born about 1863 in Jasper County, Missouri. Nothing else is known.
b. Gustavos Ericson Warren (1866-1947). Gustavos was born April 13, 1866 in Johnson County, Texas, and he died July 21, 1947 in Sinton, San Patricio, Texas. His wife was Dove Maltsberger (1874-1957), whom he married in Texas in 1899. Their children were: (i) Margaret Warren, born 1902; (ii) Gus E. Warren, Born 1903; (iii) Eric Warren, born 1904; and (iv) George William Warren (1905-1997).
c. Effie Warren (1868-1936). Effie was born October 25, 1868 in Burleson, Johnson County, Texas, and she died June 8, 1936 in Abernethy, Hale County, Texas. Her husband was Richard Marion Hardesty (1870-1944), whom she married in 1894 in Texas. Their children were: (i) Aubrey Newton Hardesty (1896-1968); (ii) Thomas Edwin Hardesty (b. 1897); (iii) Anna May Hardesty (1899-1971); (iv) James Marion Hardesty (b. 1901); (v) Wesley Warren Hardesty (1905-1982); (vi) Rudd E. Hardesty (1907-1975).

***

John David Jones (1827-1870)--Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

John David Jones (1827-1870)–Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

3. John David Jones (1827-1870). John David Jones was born in Tennessee in 1827, and he died September 28, 1870 in Jasper County, Missouri. He will reappear in later a later article concerning the murder of John Bass Jones (1838-1867). John Bass Jones was a brother of Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859) and Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890)–the third Jones family. John David Jones’ wife was Elizabeth Foster (1840-1902). She will also reappear in the John Bass Jones murder article. John David Jones and Elizabeth Foster were married December 20, 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children were:

a. Thomas Allen Jones (1861-1942). Thomas was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1861, and he died October 12, 1942 in Southwest City, McDonald County, Missouri. He married Mary Sabrit Thornhill (1874-1944) in Benton County, Arkansas. Their children were: (i) Oliga Jones, born 1891; (ii) Victor H. Jones, born 1897); (iii) Clarence Lloyd Jones, born 1906; (iv) Lucy Helen Jones (1910-1972); (v) Daisy Belle Jones (born 1912).

b. Hettie D. Jones, born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1864. She disappears after the 1880 Census, where she appears in her mother’s household(17). I have no additional information.

c. William H. Jones (1866-1939). William was born in Jasper County, Missouri in July 1866, and he died in 1939 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. He married Alberta V. (Birdie) Kessler (1868-1961) in 1889. She was the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Kessler (1832-1919) and Amanda Grace Wing (1844-1915)–my second great grandparents–and a sister of Josephine Virginia Kessler (1865-1925), wife of Salathiel Monroe Spence (1854-1921)–my great grandparents. Alberta was my second great aunt. According to the Ancestry calculator, William H. Jones is my second cousin three times removed. Their children were (i) W. Glenn Jones, born March 1890 in Arkansas; (ii) Neal C. Jones, who was born September 1898 in Missouri; and (iii) Walter Leroy Jones (1906-1964).

d. John D. (Charles) Jones (1871-1924). John was born after his father’s death on January 2, 1871 in Fidelity, Jasper, Missouri, and he died June 27, 1924 in Pineville, McDonald County, Missouri. On March 23, 1893, he married Hattie Rebinah Crocker (1873-1957) in Neosho, Newton, Missouri. They had a son: Raymond Gerald Jones (1895-1967).

***

4. Luvina McClellan Jones (1830-1878) Luvina was born March 28, 1830 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee, and she died February 9, 1878 in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho. On March 17, 1850, she married Amos Buchanan (1826-1907) in Jasper County, Missouri. He was a farmer and a minister or an evangelist. The family traveled frequently. By 1859, the Buchanans relocated to Missouri City, Texas. They were in Drakesville, Iowa in 1863. They returned to Missouri for a while and then relocated to Idaho. Their children follow:

a. Rebecca Jane Buchanan (1851-1932). Rebecca was born March 23, 1851 in Neosho, Newton, Missouri, and she died January 1932 in Glendale, Douglas, Oregon. Her husband was Daniel Peter Greninger (1847-1925). Their children were: (i) Minnie Greninger, b. 1871; (ii) Mary Lu Greninger (1875-1946); (iii) Ira L. Greninger (1878-1960; (iv) Audrey A. Greninger (1880-1957); (v) Cora Greninger (1882-1956); (vi) Winifred Freginger (1885-1970); (vii) Bonita Greninger (1892-1892); (viii) Juanity Margerite Greninger (1892-1979).

b. Maryetta Lorella Buchanan (1852-1871). Maryetta was born November 10, 1852 in Missouri, and she died September 10, 1871 in Missouri. I have no additional information.

c. Millie Ann Buchanan (1855-1920). Millie was born March 3, 1855 in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, and she died May 13, 1920 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. She may or may not have married a Ben Wilson. I have no information about him. On May 12, 1878, she married Hiram Buckley Cole (1836-1918) in Moscow, Latah, Idaho. Their children were: (i) Sarah Lorene Cole (b. 1881); (ii) Alta Rebecca Cole (1882-1922); (iii) Hyrum Louis Cole (1884-1947); (iv) Ollie Annice Cole (1887-1962); (v) June Cole (b. 1888); (vi) Constance Mable Cole (1891-1951); (vii) Tressie Abigail Cole (1893-1981); (viii) Millard Donald Cole (1895-1963); (ix) Mildred Dorothy Cole (1895-1972).

d. Levi Perry Buchanan (1856-1857). Levi was born August 23, 1956 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died the following year on September 25, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri.

e. Mark Lemuel Buchanan (1858-1932). Mark was born March 12, 1858 in Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died July 13, 1932 in Sedro-Woolley, Skagkit, Washington. On November 20, 1881, he married Sarah Emma Ellis (1864-1934) in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho. Their children were: (i) Myrtle Levina Buchanan (b. 1884); (ii) Oscar Henry Buchanan (b. 1887); (iii) Ollie Viola Buchanan (b. 1894); (iv) Ina Margaret Buchanan (b. 1897); (v) Henry Ellis Buchanan (1899-1938); (vi) Lorna May Buchanan (b. 1901).

f. Ira Samuel Buchanan (1859-1925). Ira was born November 5, 1859 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas, and he died March 31, 1925 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. He married Lurana Holden (b. 1869) in 1883. Their children were: (i) William A. Buchanan, born 1884; (ii) Ira R. Buchanan, born 1886; (iii) Charles F. Buchanan, born 1890; (iv) Ashley Buchanan, born 1892; (v) Lawrence Buchanan, born 1894; (vi) Oscar Buchanan, born 1895; (vii) Lillie L. Buchanan, born 1897; (viii) Elmer C. Buchanan, born 1901.

g. Amos Newton Buchanan (1861-1863). Amos was born in 1861, and he died in 1863. I don’t have any additional details.

h. John Andrew Buchanan (1863-1936). John was born October 2, 1863 in Drakesville, Davis County, Iowa, and he died December 22, 1935 in Astoria, Clatsop, Oregon. He married his first wife Nellie Wells August 11, 1889 in Yamhill, Yamhill, Oregon. They had one child: Bonnie B. Buchanan, born about 1891 in Oregon. He married his second wife Madge Belle Bond (1863-1951) on January 16, 1901 in Roseburg, Douglas County, Oregon. Their children were: (i) Mary Maurine Buchanan, born in 1903; and (ii) Louise L. Buchanan, born in 1906.

i. Amos J. Buchanan (1866-1942). Amos was born February 12, 1865 in Missouri, and he died March 3, 1942 in Los Angeles. His wife was Lilly B. Cloyd, who was born in 1876 in Los Angeles. Amos and his wife appear in her mother’s household on the 1920 Census for Julia Mariah Bottom Cloyd(18). A Dale Miller, born about 1914, lives with them. He is listed as Julia’s grandson. I believe he may have been the son of one of Lilly’s sisters–but I haven’t found a Miller married to any of them as yet. He could have been Lilly’s son by a previous marriage, but I haven’t found evidence of that either. He may be the Dale Miller, born about 1914, who died in Los Angelis California June 24, 1921(19). Dale Miller does not appear on subsequent census records for Amos and Lilly Buchanan.

j. Luvina Buchanan (1866-1866). Luvina was born February 13, 1866, and she died November 10, 1866.

k. Dora Belle Buchanan (1868-1955). Dora Belle was born August 1, 1868 in Missouri and she died July 23, 1955. Her husband was George H. Lynch (b. 1856), whom she married in 1894. They had two children: (i) Verna G. Lynch, who was born in 1896, and (ii) Verda Zell Lynch (1898-1990)

l. Cora Buchanan (1870-1968). Cora was born September 3, 1870 in Missouri, and she died May 5, 1968 in Toppenish, Washington. She married William Arthur Jones (1860-1945) on May 10, 1897 in Spokane, Washington. He was born in Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois and his parents were Joseph Henry Jones (1831-1891) and Mary Jane Morgan (1834-1921). This Jones line came from Canada. The children of Cora Alice Buchanan and William Arthur Jones were: (i) Joseph Arthur Jones (1898-1980); (ii) Harold Arthur Jones (1898-1980); (iii) Millicent B. Jones (b. 1903); Miriam Livina Jones (1905-1998); (iv) Clay Buchanan Jones (1909-1993).

m. Margaret “Maggie” May Buchanan (1874-1890). Maggie was born August 17, 1874 in Missouri and she died at the age of sixteen on October 7, 1890 in Yanhill, Oregon.

Luvina McClellan Jones died February 9, 1878 in Moscow, Nez Perz, Idaho. Amos Buchanan married Chlore Isabelle Cole (1853-1933) on June 30, 1878 in Nez Perce, Idaho. They had three children.

a. Pearlie Minerva Buchanan (1880-1963). Pearlie was born October 13, 1880 Near Moscow, Latah, Idaho, and she died July 10, 1963 in Independence, Jackson, Missouri. She married Henry Austin Moriarity (1875-1942). Their children were: Lete B. Moriarity (b. 1905) and Henry Austin Moriarity, Jr. (b. 1908).

b. Fredrick Garfield Buchanan (1882-1953). Fredrick was born March 30, 1882 in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho, and he died August 18, 1953 in Columbus, Cherokee, Kansas. His wife was Mary Elsie Nichols (1887-1971). Their children were: (i) Gladys Irene Buchanan (1908-1971); (ii) Della May Buchanan (1909-1971); (iii) Rosa Unis Buchanan (1910-1912); (iv) Julia Onis Buchanan (1912-1975); (v) Ruby Inez Buchanan (1914-1965); (vi) Leonard (Onis) Green Buchanan (1915-1915); (vii) Juanita Louise Buchanan (1916-1971); (viii) Lewis Edward Buchanan (1918-1918); (ix) Cora Alberta Buchanan (1920-1971); (x) Twyla Marie Buchanan (1923-2001); (xi) Cleta Jane Buchanan (1925-1971).

c. Martha Fairchild Buchanan (1887-1932). Martha was born February 2, 1887 in Idaho, and she died June 17, 1932. She appears to have never married. I have no additional information about her.

Amos Buchanan and his wife Chloe Isabelle Cole divorced about 1889. He left for Oregon shortly after the divorce, which was probably the reason for the discord. He wanted to go to Oregon and Chloe didn’t! The children of his first marriage went to Oregon with him, and Chloe’s children remained with her. She relocated to Crestline, Cherokee, Kansas, where she married Henry Wiggins (1841-1910) on November 15, 1892. Their children follow: (i) Ledori Tecoma Wiggins (1892-1895); (ii) Loretti Seattle Wiggins (1893-1981); (iii) Columbia Cole Wiggins (1894-1929); (iv) Unknown Child Wiggins (1888-1889).

Amos Buchanan also remarried in 1889. His third wife was Amanda Frazier (1853-1904). Amanda was born in Missouri, and she died in Oregon. Amanda died in 1904; Amos died May 2, 1907. They are buried together in Roseburg Memorial Gardens, Roseburg, Douglas, Oregon.

***

5. Nancy Jane Jones (1832-1929) Nancy Jane Jones’ records have been confused with Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890). When I first started working on the Jones line, I thought they were one and the same. That isn’t the case. Nancy Tennessee Jones (1818-1890) (already discussed earlier in this article) was a sister of Daniel Jackson Jones and of John Bass Jones (the third Jones line). Nancy Jane Jones was a daughter of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence, and she is under discussion here. She was born February 19, 1832 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died March 19, 1929 in Claude, Armstrong, Texas. Her nickname was “Maxie”, so she appears on some records as Nancy Jane “Maxie” Jones/Hood.

Nancy had two husbands. They were brothers and sons of Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)–my third great grandparents. Their daughter and sister of the two brothers–Manerva Caroline Hood (1824-1901)–my second great grandmother–married my second great grandfather–William David Spence (1827-1907. William David was the second oldest son of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859)> and Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872). (This whole thing keeps traveling around in a circle!).

On November 20, 1853, Nancy Jane Jones married Norris Franklin Hood (1832-1863) in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children follows:

a. Laura “Laurie” Elmira Hood (1854-1927). Laurie was born October 25, 1854 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died September 8, 1927 in Lockney, Floyd County, Texas. She married Thomas Jefferson Thornton (1847-1929) on January 14, 1874 in Johnson County, Texas. Their children were: (i) William Newton Thornton (1874-1971); (ii) Exander Dudley Thornton (1876-1961); (iii) Walter Thornton (1878-1884); (iv) Charles Fredrick Thornton (1880-1956); (v) Margaret “Maggie” May Thornton (1882-1966); (vi) Minnie Gertrude Thornton (1884-1962); (vii) Lida M. Thornton (b. 1886); (viii) Edwin W. Thornton (1888-1971); (ix) James Claude Thornton (1890-1958); (x) Burton Norris “Pete” Thornton (1894-1970); (xi) Bertie Jane Thornton (1894-1989).

b. Alice Almina Hood (1856-1932). Alice was born August 26, 1856 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died April 1, 1932 in Alamogordo, Otero, New Mexico. On April 24, 1881, she married Joseph Lucas Hudman (1853-1909) in Palo Pinto County, Texas. Their children were: (i) Bessie Lee Hudman (1883-1955); (ii) Willie Norris Hudman (1884-1919); (iii) Donnie Nora Hudman (1885-1980); (iv) Etta Cordelia Hudman (1888-1891); (v) Charles T. Hudman (1889-1947); (vi) Maud V. Hudman (1891-1958); (vii) Olen Warren Hudman (1898-1918); (viii) Glenn Fields Hudman (1898-1966).

c. Charles A. “Charlie” Hood (1859-1861). Charles was born in 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died in 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri.

d. Eva Lourella Hood (1861-1944). Eva was born January 1, 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died October 8, 1944 in Vernon, Texas. In August 1881, she married Richard Berry Richardson (1857-1937) in Palo Pinto County, Texas. Their children were: (i) Neppie Mae Richardson (1882-1918); (ii) Maude E. Richardson (1884-1974); (iii) Essie Ollie Richardson (1886-1888); (iv) Willie Glenn Richardson (1888-1963); (v) Richard Norris Richardson (1894-1960); (vi) Nancy J. Richardson (b. 1897); (vii) Eva Louise Richardson (1910-1990).

e. Norris F. “Bud” Hood (1863-1930). Bud Hood was born in Jasper County, Missouri on April 16, 1863, and he died October 24, 1930 in Claude, Armstrong, Texas. According to his death certificate, he was hit by a freight train. There is a question as to whether he ever married. The consensus is that he did not. However, a 1910 Census record for a Norris Hood suggests the following:


Name:
Norris Hood
Age in 1910:
49
Birth Year:
abt 1861
Birthplace:
Missouri
Home in 1910:
Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri
Race:
White
Gender:
Male
Relation to Head of House:
Head
Marital Status:
Married
Spouse’s Name:
Maud Hood
Father’s Birthplace:
Tennessee
Mother’s Birthplace:
Illinois
Household Members:
Norris Hood 49
Maud Hood 37
Roy Hood 21
Charley Hood 19
Harrie Hood 17
Rubie Hood 16
John Hood 14
Maggie Hood 12
Mary Hood 6
(20)

Norris Hood–1910 Jasper County–is not Bud Hood. Both of Bud’s parents were born in Tennessee, and 1910 Norris’s mother’s birthplaceis identified as Illinois. I have an idea that Norris Hood (1910 Census) is probably a member of the David K. Hood family, who remained in Jasper County. Will save that for a later article. Additionally, Bud Hood was born in Jasper County, Missouri April 16, 1863. Norris Hood of the 1910 entry was born in Jasper County, Missouri in August 1860.

When the Civil War intensified, Norris Franklin Hood, Sr. signed up to fight. He joined the Confederate 11th Missouri Infantry 11th Regiment, Missouri Infantry Company A. Some people think this was a Union regiment. According to his military papers, the Missouri 11th was Confederate(21). The Joel Owensby Hood branch of the Hood family retained southern sympathies and left Jasper County, Missouri. After leaving Missouri, they did not return–especially after John Bass Jones’ murder!

Norris died February 17, 1863 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas. I don’t know whether he was killed in a skirmish or whether he died of an illness. Three years later, Nancy Jane married William Washington Hood (1837-1902), a brother of Norris. They remained in Jasper County, Missouri, and left after the John Bass Jones murder. They were in Arkansas and McDonald County, Missouri for a while, and then moved on to Texas, settling first in Johnson County and next in Palo Pinto. They returned to Benton County, Arkansas by 1900, where William Hood died November 20, 1902. Nancy Jane returned to Texas, and she died in Claude, Armstrong, Texas on March 15, 1929. The children of Nancy Jane Jones and William Washington Hood follow:

a. Joel Augustus “Gus” Hood (1868-1953). Joel Augustus Hood was born in Arkansas December 2, 1868, and he died April 10, 1953 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. He is buried in the Claude Cemetery. His wife was Lurena Bell (1874-1943). Their children were: (i) Myrtle Lee Hood (1895-1982); (ii) Charles Franklin Hood (1898-1948); and (iii) Dessie B. Hood (1902-1994).

b. William Warren Hood (1869-1944). William Warren Hood was born November 1, 1869 in McDonald County, Missouri, and he died May 26, 1944 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. His wife was Claudine Brunell Chauveneau (1880-1961). She was born in St. Etienne, France. Their children were: (i) Paul Hood (1899-1985); (ii) Mamie Hood (1900-1942); (iii) Ruth Hood (1901-1984); (iv) Francis “Fat” Hood (1903-1963); (v) Leona Rebecca Hood (1907-1992); (vi) Joe Hood (1912-1968).

c. Hugh Anderson Hood (1875-1930). Hugh Anderson Hood was born July 1, 1875 in Johnson County, Texas, and he died after 1930 possibly in Vernon, Willbarger, Texas. His wife was Anna Arabella Stafford, who was born in 1874. Their children were: (i) Hugh Franklin “Frank” Hood (1897-1961); (ii) Irene Hood, born 1899; (iii) Ethel Hood, born 1902; (iv) Jack Hood (1911-1991; (v) Edith Hood (1913-1914)

d. Finis Abel “Coon” Hood (1878-1938). Finis Abel Hood was born February 8, 1878 in Palo Pinto, Texas, and he died October 2, 1938 in Armstrong County, Texas. His wife was Jesse Mason, born 1882. Their children were: (i) Lonnie Hood, born 1902; (ii) Willie Hood, born 1904; (iii) Robert Hood, born 1908; (iv) Edwin Hood (b. 1912); (v) Owen Hood (b. 1915); Floy Hood (b. 1919.

***

7. James Riley Jones (1835-1868). James Riley Jones was born about 1835 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died before November 21, 1868 in Jasper County, Missouri. He appears on the 1850 and 1860 Census records for Jasper County, Missouri.

A Mystery: Mary Jane Jones (1832-1910)

I found Mary Jane Jones (1832-1910) listed as a child of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence on a number of Ancestry trees. To date, I do not know whether she should be listed with them. Her parents are identified on her death certificate as L and Unknown Jones(22). She was born October 11, 1832 in Greenville, Green County, Tennessee, which is in the southeastern part of the state. To my knowledge, Lewis Spence and Milly Catherine Jones never lived in Greenville. So I am inclined to believe that she was not one of their children. She married Jotham Franklin Weston (1827-1865) in Greenville. The family relocated to Sullivan County, Missouri, where they appear to have had no connection with the Jasper County people. A summary of her Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:

Birth: Oct. 11, 1832
Greeneville
Greene County
Tennessee, USA
Death: Aug. 25, 1910
Sullivan County
Missouri, USA

Daughter of L and (Unknown) Jones

Mo. Death Cert. #26203

Family links:
Spouse:
Jotham F Weston (____ – 1865)*

Children:
Columbus Page Weston (1852 – 1931)*
William Barton Weston (1856 – 1943)*
Lucinda Catherine Weston West (1859 – 1945)*
Leroy F Weston (1862 – 1913)*
Eliza Ann Weston Stringer (1864 – 1917)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Campground Cemetery
Osgood
Sullivan County
Missouri, USA

Created by: Theron Dowell
Record added: Oct 05, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21979397(23)

To Be Continued in Part Eight With The Third Jones Family

References

(1) 1820 Census about Lewis Jones for Perry County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Davidson County, Tennessee Marriage Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) 1820 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) 1830 Census for Lewis Jones, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Missouri Marriage Records for Daniel Jones and Rebecca Jones, Barry County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about Daniel Columbus Warren, dated March 10, 1931. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about Asbury Franklin Eddleman, dated September 17, 1925. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) 1850 Census for Nancy Warren, Franklin County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Franklin County, Missouri Records about Nelson Warren and Mrs. Nancy Park. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles about Lewis M. Warren. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) U.S., Union Soldiers Compiled Service Records, 1861-1865 about Lewis M. Warren. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) Mary Warren Birdwell Obituary, Dallas News (1938). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14) Kentucky Marriages, 1851-1900 about Lewis M. Jones and Sarah Jane Adams. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) 1870 Census, Greene County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Gravestone Photo for Louis M. Warren, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17) 1880 Census for Elizabeth Ady, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18) 1920 Census for Julia Maria Cloyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 9 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) California Death Index for Dale Miller. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 9 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20) 1910 Federal Census for Norris Hood, Jasper County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21) U.S. Soldiers Compiled Service Records and Profile, 1861-1865 about Norris F. Hood. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22) Mo. Death Cert. #26203 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Cited in Find-a-Grave Memorial 21979397 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(23) Find-a-Grave Memorial #21979397 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Six: Playing the Naming Game: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and the Roden/Wroughton Factor

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Elisha Spence, his ancestors and their descendants possessed a common habit: whenever someone had a child, he or she would be assigned a name for someone else in the family. I noticed this in my research and as a result, began looking for possible namesakes in the family. And then I hit a stumbling block with Elisha and Susanna Spence’s oldest daughter. Milly Catherine Spence? Was she named for one person or for two? When I could find no Milly or Catherine or Milly Catherine who would qualify in the Spence families, I turned my attention to the Spencer line where I recently discovered my answer.

Sheer frustration drove me downstairs to my collection of research notebooks early last week. I couldn’t write about Milly Catherine Spence until finding the person she was named for! Approximately thirty to forty notebooks line the shelves of my writing bookcase. They even spill out onto the floor beside the case where they are piled high. These notebooks comprise all of my research notes dating back to the early 1990s. I taught morning classes back in those early days. My afternoons were spent in the Denver Public Library or in our campus library looking for answers. I saved all my notes, right or wrong. It is amusing now to look over those notes and see how many directions I undertook before charting a definite course. Such is the case with my old South Carolina notebook. I found it wedged behind other notebooks on the case. And I also found the answer I was seeking. Milly Catherine Spence was named after John Spencer’s first wife!

I’ve already recounted my failed attempts in identifying John Spencer’s first wife. I encountered significant problems in identifying both wives until DNA matches settled the matter concerning the second. The first wife remained a dilemma. At one time, I thought she was Milly Catherine Duncan, John Duncan’s daughter. But that Milly Catherine married Isaac Farmer. They moved to another part of South Carolina, and she lived until 1837. I found another record indicating that a John Spencer married a Sarah (last name unknown)–but then that John Spencer wasn’t mine. So I was back at the drawing board once again. Then in my South Carolina notebook, I found some interesting clues. The first is a passage from South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) regarding the early Baptist Churches in Chester County, South Carolina:

One of the ministers in Sandy River congregation in 1791 was Rev. William Woodward, who, because of the distance from the old church, gathered a distinct group on Lower or Little Sandy River in 1789; this body received separate constitution in 1792. Mr. Woodward then became the minister of the new church and remained in that position until his death. He was assisted for a time after 1793 by Mr. Vandiver, a candidate for the ministry. f643 The church tried Amos Layard’s gift but refused to license him: it extended “Brother Gents’ license of exhortation to preach any place where a door may be opened.” Brother Simonton was apparently treasurer, but it was later decided that this function should belong to the deacon’s office, and Brother Redmond replaced Mr. Simonton. Cases for discipline brought up in the early years include two for joining the Masons, and the authority of the church was strong enough to cause the offending brethren to promise either not to meet with the Masons or to leave the order entirely. The church insisted upon strict observance of the Sabbath, James Hand should have started to market on Monday or Tuesday and thus have avoided traveling and working his horses and slaves on Sunday, as he was forced to do by starting on Friday; other members were reprimanded for walking or riding over their farms on Sunday. A resolution to allow grievances to be laid before the deacons prior to being submitted to the church was soon rescinded. In an interesting trial of a woman accused of knowingly marrying a man already married, the woman’s opinion that the trial committee was prejudiced caused the church to allow her to choose the majority of a new committee which reported in her favor. f644 The membership of Lower Sandy River rose from fifty in 1792 to fifty-five in 1794, but when it entered the Bethel Association in 1803, it numbered thirtytwo. f645 The church is said to have had three buildings, the first on land of Eli Cornwell on Sandy River. About 1800 it was decided to remove the church to a more convenient location. A group of trustees consisting of Elder William Woodward, Richard Evans, James Huey, Daniel Tressels, Henry Carter, Mason Huey, Jacob Dungan, Nobley Coates, and Neguens Whitted bought on October 11, 1802, a lot for three hundred dollars upon which a second wooden building “was erected beyond the cemetery in the direction of Chester” five miles from Chester on the Ashford ferry road. f646 The branch of Pacolet on Fishing Creek, which claims to have been organized in 1792, was so well established in 1793 and 1794 as to have supplies appointed for it by the Bethel Association. Its separate constitution must have taken place in 1795, as in that year Pacolet dismissed nineteen members, and a new church on Fishing Creek called Hopewell entered the Bethel Association. The new church had no minister until 1801 or 1802, when Rev. Samuel Eccles took up the work. He probably remained with the church only through 1803, after which Samuel McCreary, who was at that time a licensed minister, must have preached for them. Hopewell had few members until stirred by the great revival. f647(1)

From South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) by Leah Townsend:
Ahimaas Spencer, 189n, 193, 224+
John Roden, 141+
William Roden, 141n, 147, 147n
William a member of Pacolet, which became Skull Shoals in 1787(2),(3)

I had forgotten all about the Roden family. When I discovered this item in my notebook, I remember writing the name down.

Then came another discovery! While searching into their records, I discovered that I had “danced” with them before!

“Roden” was originally “Wroughton”–a family discussed in my third book: Chasing the Wild Bunch: One Woman’s Journey. The Wroughtens resided in Dorchester County, Maryland. While researching them several years ago, I had no idea that a line of their descendants eventually settled in Chester County, South Carolina!

The Roden/Wroughton Factor

Mary Catherine (“Milly” Catherine) Roden was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in Greenville County, South Carolina. It was still 96 District at the time of her death and did not become Greenville County until 1786(4). She was the daughter of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807) and Mary Potts (1720-1785), the granddaughter of John Roden, Sr. (1685-1720) and Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), and the great granddaughter of William Wroughton (1663-1746) and Hannah Meredith (1663-1689). It appears that the elder William had three wives: Hannah Meredith (1663-1689), Hannah Susannah “Anna” Mace (1660-1702), and Rachel Wingate (1668-1746). William Wroughton comprised a small section of the book I previously mentioned, so I’ll deal with him first.

A Quaker, William Wroughton was a prominent individual in Dorchester County. When he died May 18, 1746, he left his estate to his oldest son Thomas, provided for his beloved wife, Rachel, and also provided for her daughter Rachel Wroughton, who subsequently married a Pritchett(5). When I conducted my original research on William Wroughton several years ago, I lamented that many of the records were jumbled. It was difficult finding two people who agreed on anything since original Dorchester County, Maryland records were destroyed over time. Based upon my earlier research and the research I have recently completed, the following is an outline for his family:

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Meredith:
1. Thomas Wroughton (1684-1765)–his father’s chief heir. Thomas was born in 1684 in Dorchester County, Maryland, and he died May 4, 1765. I have no additional information about him.
2. John Wroughton/Roden, Sr. (1685-1720)–Mary “Milly Catherine Roden’s grandfather. John was born in 1685 in Dorchester County, and he died April 24, 1720 in Calvert County, Maryland. His wife was Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), the daughter of Edward Winman (1640-1702) and Mary (last name unknown). A story about John and his wife follows:

Notes:
John was apparently brought up in Dorchester County, Maryland. He met Elizabeth Winman, who was also being courted by George Wade, Jr. Apparently John was the more persistent of the two in his pursuit of Elizabeth, for they were married in May of 1706(6).

It is possible that John learned a lesson from his brother, Henry, which I will discuss later. It is also interesting to note that shortly after John died in 1720, his wife married George Wade.(7)

The children of John and Elizabeth Wroughton/Roden follow:

(a) John Roden (1707-1787). John was christened March 7, 1707 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(8), and he died in 1787 in South Carolina. I have no additional information about him.
(b) William Roden (1710-1770William was christened October 11, 1710 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(9), and he died in 1770 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife has been identified as Jane Winman (1712-1762), who may have been a cousin. Their children were: (i) Thomas Roden (1731-1793); (ii) Jeremiah Roden (1737-1821); (iii) William Roden (1738-1799); (iv) John Roden (1739-1821); (v) George Roden (1743-1836); (vi) Zadock Roden (1745-1794). William’s second wife was Mary Willifield.
(c) Sarah Roden, who was christened November 16, 1713 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(10). I have no additional information about her.
(d) Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)–Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father. I will detail her family separately.
(e) Ann Roden–I only have her name
(f) Susannah Roden–I only have her name.

What I have learned from these names is that Susannah/Susanna was as much of a Roden/Wroughton name as it was a Toney name! John Roden settled in Frederick County, Maryland. John’s sons moved to South Carolina.

3. William Wroughton (1686-1738). William was born in Dorchester County and died there. He died before his father. I have no information about him.

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Mace:

1. Dorcas Wroughton (b. 1690). I have no additional information.
2. Henry Wroughton (1695-1747). The note on my ancestral tree reads: “Betrothal to 2nd cousin, Mary Meredith, but the marriage did not take place. Mary married James Robert Ingram”(11).

Mary Meredith (1695-1712) and James Robert Ingram (1692-1757) were my my sixth great grandparents on my father’s Inghram line and James Robert Ingram is my fifth great grandfather on my father’s Stillians line–hence my earlier comment concerning John Roden’s wooing of his wife Elizabeth Winman! (I know nothing else about Henry Wroughton).

3. Josias Wroughton (1695-1761). [He may have been Henry’s twin.] Josias lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing more about him, although he did acquire a property in Dorchester County called Lazy Hill on November 15, 1728(12).
4. Ambrose Wroughton (1700-1747). Ambrose lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing else about him.

As already noted, William Wroughten and his third wife Rachel Wingate had one daughter: Rachel Wroughten, who was born about 1703 and who married a Pritchett.

The Family of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)

Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. was born in 1715 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died July 7, 1807 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Potts (1720-1785). According to an paragraph attached to my ancestral tree (original author unknown):

Thomas was one of the earliest Roden’s in Chester County, S.C. and he probably came with his brothers Zadoc, John Sr., William, and Jeremiah. Thomas owned 1,172 acres in Camden County. This grant received of the Rt. Hon. Charles Gercil Montagu, the governor of Normandon and Chief of the Province of S.C. Thomas’ estate was administerd 7-17-1809 by Richard Wilkes, with Wm. Wilkes and Alex Wilson. He was in Chester County as of 1764, purchasing land to which his brother, John Sr. was a witness.(13)

Thomas’s brother William had a son named Zadock, so that may be the reference here. The important thing about this paragraph is that it provides a Chester County entry date of 1764 for Thomas.

Thomas married Mary Potts in Anne Arundel County in 1732. A discussion of their family follows:

1. John Roden (1740-1807) John Roden was born in 1740 in Maryland and he died October 6, 1821 in Chester County, South Carolina. I have no additional information for him.

2. George Roden (b. 1743) George was born March 25, 1743 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died in Kentucky. The date of his death is unknown but it would have been after February 27, 1834 in Graves County, Kentucky George’s story unfolds in his Application for a Pension for Service in the Revolutionary War:

State of Kentucky Graves County: On this 27th day of February 1834 personally appeared before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County and state aforesaid George Rowdon aged ninety years and eleven months a resident of the said County of Graves and State aforesaid who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated (to wit) he states that he was born in the County of Calvert and State of Maryland on the 25th day of March 1743 (he once had a record of his age but it is now lost out of his possession) — this declarant’s father moved with him from Calvert County Maryland where he deponent was a child said 4 or 5 years old & settled in Frederick County Virginia on the Shenandoah River where this declarant lived with his father until about the year 1763 when he with his father migrated to Camden district in the State of South Carolina. That he first entered the service of the United States in the said district of Camden in State of South Carolina in the month of May in the year 1778 as a private drafted militia man and was placed under the command of Captain John Winn with whom he marched on an expedition against Saint Augustine in East Florida he joined (near Augusta in Georgia) a large corps of troops under the command of General Robert Howe — with whom he marched as far as the Oconee River where he was ordered to stop & stayed with a sick man by Captain Winn and gave him a written order for that purpose he stayed with this sick man (who was afflicted with a swelling in his groin) until the month of September 1778 when he returned home with him where he arrived in the latter part of September 1778 he states that he was in the service of the United States 4 months and 2 weeks this tour to wit under Captain John Winn & General Robert Howe – in the year 1778 and that he received no written discharge. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 2nd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of April 1779 Savannah in Georgia was at this time occupied by the British which caused the Tory population of South Carolina to be troublesome to quell which mounted companies of militia man were kept in continual motion this declarant joined one of these mounted companies at the time and place above stated as a volunteer private furnishing his own horse he states that he entered for 6 months & that the said company was raised by order of General Richard Winn of the South Carolina militia and that said company was placed under the command of Captain __ Threewitts [sic, Threewits] with whom this declarant marched to the plantation of Ankram [sic, Ancrum] on the Congaree [River] where they kept their head quarters about 3 months ranging over & protecting the country from Ancrum’s this declarant with Captain Threewits marched to Orangeburg where they remained stationed 3 months after which this declarant was discharged by Captain Threewits he states that he served 6 months this tour under Captain Threewits and that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 3rd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina as a drafted private militia man he was drafted for a 6 months tour of duty and was placed in a company commanded by Captain John James he marched with Captain James in the month of March 1782 a place called the four holes not far from Charleston at which place he joined a considerable corps of drafted militia under the command of Colonel Hopkins he remained in the service under these officers stationed occasionally at the four holes until the month of September 1780 in which months he was discharged by Captain James he states that he served 6 months under the above named officers at the time above stated. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 4th time as a mounted volunteer private militia man furnishing his own horse he entered in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of January 1781 under Captain John McCool & marched with Captain McCool & his company in pursuit of the Tory Colonel Will Cunningham [“Bloody Bill” Cunningham] date pursued the Tories to the Congaree & down that River some distance and after scouring the country for some time we returned home when your declarant was disbanded with the rest of the company by Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he states he served one month under Captain McCool & that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 5th time immediately after his return from the expedition under Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he was drafted as a private this time by order of General Richard Winn for 4 months in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina he entered under Captain Lyles & marched to Orangeburg where we joined a Regiment under Colonel Hopkins he states that he remained with Colonel Hopkins at Orangeburg 4 months when he was discharged by Captain Lyles he states that he served 4 months this time under Captain Lyles & Colonel Hopkins he was discharged in the month of June 1781. This declarant served his 6th tour of duty as a private in the year 1781 he was drafted in the said district of Camden and State of South Carolina for a 3 months tour of duty he entered in the month of July 1781 and was placed in a company commanded by Captain __ Martin he marched with Captain Martin to join General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] but did not reach General Green in consequence of some misconduct of Captain Martin who these are did his company in the beginning of September 1781 just before the battle of the Eutaw Springs. In consequence of which desertion the whole company returned home he states that he served 2 months this tour under Captain Martin. Thus your declarant served 4 months and 2 weeks in the year 1778 under Captain John Winn & General Howe; 6 months under Captain Threewits in the year 1779 — 6 months under Captain John James & Colonel Hopkins in the year 1780 — one month in the same year under Captain John McCool — 4 months under Captain Lyles and Colonel Hopkins in the year 1781 and 2 months in the same year under Captain Martin making in the whole one year and 11 months and 2 weeks besides a variety of small scouting tours which she has not enumerated. He states that he has long since lost all his discharges and that he has no documentary evidence of his services and that he knows of no living witness by whom he can prove his services he states that Asa Dodson, Talbot E. Slaydon, John Clapp, Adam Clapp and Henderson Gregory etc. all his neighbors who will bear ample testimony to his character for veracity and as to his reputation of having been a soldier of the revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state or Territory whatever. This declarant states that he moved from Camden district South Carolina to Warren County Tennessee in the year 1817 & from thence he moved to Madison County Alabama in the year 1821 & from thence he moved to Graves County Kentucky in the year 1830 where he has resided ever since & where he at present resides.
S/ George Rowdon Subscribed & sworn to before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County & state aforesaid S/ Matthias Travis, JP [William Holifield, a clergyman, and Ervin Anderson gave the standard supporting affidavit.](14)

I find it interesting that George Roden and Levi Spence (Elisha Spence’s second son) were in Graves County, Kentucky about the same period of time. Levi Spence is the subject of Part 5 of this series.

3. William Roden (1745-1800). A copy of William’s will follows. He was born in 1745 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died September 5, 1800 at Brushy Fork, Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Margaret (1745-1805), by whom he had a son–Jonathan Roden (1775-1854). A copy of the will follows. To view it, click on the image:

William Roden 1800 Will

William Roden 1800 Will(15)

***

4. MARY CATHERINE (“MILLY CATHERINE”) RODEN (1754-1784). Mary was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in 96 District, South Carolina (what would become Greenville County in 1786). Judging from available Ancestry trees, a number of family researchers believed a child named Mary was in this family, but they knew nothing else about her. Mary’s name is listed as either Mary?? or as Unknown Daughter.

There is an interesting story about Mary. When she was little and people asked her about her name, she would pronounce it “Miwy Catrin!” The family began calling her “Milly!” And so she became known as Milly Catherine from that day forward. And there is something else quite interesting about Milly Catherine Roden. She was probably some degree of cousin with Caroline Toney, although I haven’t discovered that connection as yet. Milly married John Spencer (1750-1801) in Chester County, South Carolina in 1769, and returned with him to 96 District. Milly Catherine and John would have three sons. I’ve already discussed them earlier, so I will not go into detail here. However, I will list them separately and add additional information I have discovered about them:

Levi Spencer (1770-1844). (A Levi Roden will appear in one of the family groups listed below. They were born about the same period of time. One of them was named for the other. And, of course and as already noted, Levi Spence was named after Levi Spencer). I have figured out why Levi Spencer opted to go to Georgia. A number of his Roden cousins went from South Carolina to Alabama first and then to Georgia. Some of those cousins also went to Alabama and to Georgia by way of Tennessee.

John David Spencer (1775-1820). I’m beginning to think that this was the father’s full time: John David Spencer, Sr.! The argument is well-founded because John David’s grandfather’s full name was William David Spencer. The elder William used his middle name for two sons: William David Spencer and John David Spencer. Young John David was named for his father and his grandfather.

Thomas Spencer (1784-1810). Milly died giving birth to Thomas. He is named for her father: Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. I don’t know his middle name as yet, but his full name may be Thomas Roden Spencer!

John Spencer married Caroline Toney after Milly’s death. This wasn’t a chance meeting. He went to Virginia where he married her. They stayed in Virginia for a couple of years and then returned to Greenville County. He met her through his first wife. I think the two women were closely connected. I also believe Caroline went to 96 District to help Milly with the boys. Two children were born of John Spencer’s second marriage:

Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer (1785-1810).–my fifth great grandmother! The name Susanna is both a Toney name and a Roden name. Her middle name was Roden and was eventually changed to Rhoda. That is a Toney, Roden, and a Spence name. She became Elisha Spence’s first wife. I also now believe she was specifically named for Jeremiah Roden’s wife. [See below.] [ALSO SEE LINK TO UPDATE AT THE END OF THIS ARTICLE.]

Abraham Spencer (1788-1865). I don’t know the source for Abraham Spencer. I would say it is a Spencer name. It may have also been a Roden name.

***

5. Jeremiah Roden (1754-1851). Jeremiah was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died January 1, 1851 in DeKalb County, Alabama. He would have been Milly’s twin. Jeremiah fought in the Revolutionary War, but his pension application was eventually rejected the year after his death(16). His wife was Susanna Kirkland (1755-1855), whom he married April 28, 1784 in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Susanna Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Caroline Toney, may well have been named for her since Susanna Spencer was born the following year! And Jeremiah was Milly Catherine’s twin! Jeremiah and Susannah Roden had the following children: (a) Margaret Roden (1784-1874); (b) John B. Roden (1787-1876); (c) Jeremiah Roden (1792-1836); (d) Benjamin Roden (1795-1851); (e) Nancy Roden (1801-1880).

6. Thomas Winman Roden, Jr. (1758-1793). Thomas was born in 1758 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died in June 1793 in Chester County, South Carolina. Thomas is rather unique in the Thomas Sr. family. While his brothers fought on the side of the Patriots in the American Revolution, Thomas Jr. remained a loyalist. I believe his loyalty to England did not arise out of any great love for the Monarchy. For the most part, the Rodens were Baptists and according to Leah Townsend, some Baptist groups were “nonresistant” or pacifistic in sentiment(17). Thomas Jr. may have belonged to a pacifist Baptist group. I don’t know how this issue settled with the rest of his family, but I believe that he and the John Spencer family were close. I say this because of the “naming game” played out when Thomas and his sister Milly named their children. Thomas married Mary Brown (1758-1790) in Anne Arundel County, Maryland in 1732. Their children follow. [Note: I will expound on some of them because of their names.]

a. Thomas Roden, born 1774. He may have died young. I know nothing else about him.
b. Alice Roden (1776-1855). Alice was born in 1776 in Chester County, South Carolina, and she died in Chester County July 28, 1855. She married Richard Wilkes (1769-1840). Their children were: (i) Mary Wilkes (1795-1851); (ii) Thomas Wilkes (1796-1838); (iii) Martha Wilkes (1798-1859); (iv) Lydia Wilkes (1802-1842); (v) Nancy Wilkes, b. 1803; (vi) Regina Wilkes, b. 1805; (vii) John Wesley Wilkes (1809-1825)

c. LEVI RODEN (1779-1852). Levi was born nine years after Levi Spencer. He was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1779, and he died in Tippah, Mississippi on April 15, 1852. His wife was Malvina Selina Blank (1780-1842). Their children were: (a) Sarah Roden (1799-1870); (b) Allisee Frances Roden (1801-1880); (c) Spencer William Roden (1801-1856); (d) Elizabeth Frances Roden (1808-1878); (e) Polly Roden (1809-1850); (f) Joshua Emory Roden (1810-1894); (g) Lavinia Roden (1816-1866); (h) Savilla Roden (1820-1866); (i) Levicy Roden (b. 1822). His second wife was Elizabeth “Betty” Isbell (1799-1856). I believe she may well connect with the Isbell family I wrote about in my third book referenced above, but I haven’t confirmed that as yet.

d. John B. Franklin Roden (1785-1870). John was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1785, and he died in 1870 in DeKalb County, Alabama. His wife was Catherine Jane (Roden) (1796-1870). Their children were (a) Sarah “Sallie” Roden (1815-1865); (b) George Washington Roden (1821-1916); (c) John Harrison Roden (1826-1900); (d) Archibald C. Rodden (b. 1833); (e) Mary E. Roden (b. 1835).

e. WILLIAM SPENCER RODEN (1790-1850). William was born in 1790 in South Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Blount County, Alabama. He married Mary Catherine Mayfield (1792-1834) in 1810 in Alabama. Their children were: (i) William Brassell Roden (1812-1884); (ii) Malinda Roden (b. 1827); (iii) Miller Roden (b. 1834).

7. Savilla Roden (1759-1854).Savilla was born in Frederick County, Maryland in 1759, and she died July 23, 1844 in Clinton, Greene County, Alabama. She married Moses Hill about 1780 in Chester County, South Carolina. He died in 1821. Their children were: (a) Thomas Hill, born 1780; (b) James Hill, born 1782; (c) Elizabeth Harrison Hill (1793-1838); (d) Moses Berry Hill (1795-1824); (e) Harriet Windham Hill (b. 1801); (f)George Washington Hill (b. 1803); (g) Rebecca Carlisle Hill (1807-1842); (h) Littleton Hill; and (I) Sarah Hill.

***

After reviewing all my evidence, I have come to one conclusion!

John Spencer’s first wife was Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden.

I still have a lot of work to do on this. I hope to find the connecting link between the Toney family and the Wroughton/Roden family. All of that could take some time. (Well, look how long it has taken me to reach this point!)

The Wroughten/Roden family will be put on hold for a while. Now, I need to catch my breath and then turn my attention once again to the Spences.

This article has been updated. Click here for the update!

To Be Continued in Part Seven with Milly Catherine Spence and Lewis Jones

References

(1) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(2) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(3) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015).
(4) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015)
(4) William Wroughton Will, May 1746. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(5) “Rivers Through Time; The History of the Roden and Milwee Families” by Johnnie Geneva Roden Dole Gambel, Chap IV, Page 1. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(6) U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Elizabeth Winman Roden and George Wade. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about John Roden (Rhodin). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about William Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Sarah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches about Henry Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Settlers of Maryland (1679-1783) about Josias Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) Paragraph titled “Land” about Thomas Winman Roden, Sr., Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) George Roden (Rowden) Revolutionary War Application for Pension, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2014. Available online at: http://www.ancestry.com
(14) William Roden 1800 Will (Image of Transcription), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Dated Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900 about Jeremiah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Five: Levi James Spence (1801-1843) and Elizabeth Gray (1804-1883)

Birth: May 1, 1804 Death: Nov. 28, 1883 Inscription: wife of Levi Burial: New Liberty Cemetery Woodville McCracken County Kentucky, USA Created by: susan quinn Record added: Sep 16, 2013 Find A Grave Memorial# 117184444

Birth: May 1, 1804 Death: Nov. 28, 1883 Inscription: wife of Levi Burial: New Liberty Cemetery Woodville McCracken County Kentucky, USA Created by: susan quinn Record added: Sep 16, 2013 Find A Grave Memorial# 117184444

When I first began my Spence research over twenty years ago and discovered the name of Elisha and Susanna Spence’s second child, I noticed only a “J” for his middle name on various records. I presumed Levi’s middle name was “John” since Susanna’s father was John Spencer. While recently updating my research on Levi, I discovered the name “James” more frequently among his children than “John.” And after changing his name on my records to Levi James Spence, I began making some remarkable discoveries!

Levi James Spence was born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina on October 25, 1801–the second child and son of Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Susanna Spencer (1785-1810). He joined his older brother, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859), who was born in Greenville, South Carolina the previous year. The Spence family had moved to Mecklenburg County during the fall of 1800. Susanna’s father John Spencer (1750-1801) died in 1801. At the time of John Spencer’s death, the young Elisha Spence family was in the process of moving to Randolph County, North Carolina, a move they completed as soon as Susanna and the infant Levi were able to travel.

Randolph County, North Carolina had been a second home for Elisha Spence, so he was really glad to get back there. Shortly after his father’s death, he moved in with his uncle, James Spence (1730-1804). James would only live for three years after Elisha’s return and would pass away in 1804. After his uncle’s death, Elisha often traveled back and forth between Randolph and Pasquotank and Camden Counties. Many of his friends and family members had already moved to Tennessee. Elisha planned to do just that, especially after the Jones families’ departure.

Young Samuel and the infant Levi were oblivious to all the excitement. Pasquotank and Camden Counties meant a great deal of fawning by family and friend admirers. While the men huddled in one corner of the porch talking about matters of importance to them, the women gathered in another area to talk about their interests. The children took Samuel and Levi under their care and entertained them in the yard. Then the fiddles came out at night, followed by singing and dancing. Levi would not remember those earlier times, but Samuel recalled many of them. For his part, Levi remembered a family who frequented those occasions. He was three years old when presented with a new infant member of that family.

“Look, Levi!” his mother told him. “See the new baby? Isn’t she pretty?”

Levi peered into the sleeping face of the baby.

“Her name is Elizabeth Gray!”

***

Elizabeth Gray was born May 1, 1804 in Pasquotank County, North Carolina to Thornton Gray (1775-1830) and Mary Frances Porter (1785-1819). Three years apart in age, young Levi Spence and Elizabeth Gray became inseparable whenever the Spences were in the area. This childhood romance continued to grow over the coming years.

The Pasquotank Gray, Russell and Porter Families

Finding this Gray family was like looking for a needle in the haystack. A number of Grays settled in North Carolina–some connected by blood while others were only connected by name. A major branch of the family settled in Stafford County, Virginia, many of whom relocated to Pasquotank, North Carolina. Another branch settled in Dobbs County in an area that became Lenoir County in 1791. Still another branch found lodging in Randolph County, while others settled in Mecklenburg. The only clues I had to this confusion consisted of two names: Thornton Gray and his wife Frances. Beyond that, I knew nothing more.

Neither did anyone else!

Then, finally, I experienced a breakthrough. The following is a brief summary of the early family.

This Gray story begins with twin brothers: Thornton Gray (1729-1776) and Griffen Gray (1729-1775). They appear to have been the sons of Alexander Gray (1701-1765) and his second wife Margaret Thynne (1707-1729), who died in childbirth with the boys(1). Alexander Gray was born June 1, 1701 in Melrose, Roxburghshire, Scotland to Alexander Gray and Elizabeth Porteous(2). His first wife’s name is unknown, but their son was Nathaniel Gray (1717-1777). Nathaniel’s line first settled in Stafford County, Virginia and eventually relocated to Pasquotank County, North Carolina and elsewhere. After the death of his first wife, Alexander married Margaret Tynne, by whom he had the twins. Margaret died in childbirth with the twins, and the following year, Alexander married Catherine Dabymple Wilson, who was born in 1707. They had a number of children:

1. Margaret Gray, b. 1732
2. Euphram Gray, b. 1734
3. Rachel Gray, b. 1734
4. Amelia Gray, b. 1735
5. Janet Gray, b. 1736
6. Alexander Gray (1736-1791)
7. Katherine Gray, b. 1737
8. William Gray, b. 1738
9. George Gray, b. 1740
10. James Gray, b. 1744(3)

My focus here is on the twins, Thornton and Griffen. I provide the rest of the information for background that represents the sum and substance of my current research. My research is by no means completed. So many of the Gray records have been jumbled, it is difficult to find two people who agree with one another. The absence of official or original records makes the process much more difficult. With this in mind, I will focus the rest of the Gray material on the twins.

Alexander Gray, the father of the twins, died October 5, 1767 in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, and is buried in Holyroodhouse, Midlothian, Scotland(4). It appears Thornton and Griffen left Scotland for North Carolina prior to their father’s death. To date I have only found one record with both names on it in North Carolina: the 1775 Militia List for Pasquotank County(5). Griffen may have died that year since that is the only record I have found bearing his name. Thornton Gray married Elizabeth (last name unknown). Thornton Gray’s 1776 Will Abstract identifies his children(6):

1. Julian (Julia/Juliana) Gray (1760-1804)–an important link with the Spence family. Julian first married a Williams (first name unknown.) Their children were: (a) Jean [Williams] Spence, b. 1785; and (b) Elizabeth [Williams] Spence (b. 1786). Her second husband was Samuel Spence (1760-1805)(7). Samuel Spence’s parents were Joseph Spence (1700-1783) and Louisa Sarah Rencher (1700-1783). Samuel descends from the Alexander Spence/Dorothy Truman line and Elisha descends from the James Spence/Esther Booth line, creating a cousin connection between them. According to my Ancestry calculator, this Samuel Spence is my 2nd cousin 7 times removed! Samuel and Julian Spence’s children were:

(a) Newton Enoch Spence (1788-1870). Newton would die in Rutherford County, Tennessee;
(b) Rencher Spence (1788-1870). Rencher would also die in Rutherford County, Tennessee;
(c) Joseph Spence (1790-1829);
(d) Brittain Spence (1791-1829). Brittain would also die in Rutherford County, Tennessee;
(e) Luckey Spence, b. 1800(8).

Newton, Rencher and Brittain would relocate to Davidson County, Tennessee with Elisha Spence. I have referenced them in my earlier article: “The Mystery of William Spence (1795-1869)”, which is the first article in the Spence series.

2. Thornton Gray (1775-1830)–the grandfather of little Elizabeth Gray. Thornton was born in 1775 in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, and he died before 1830 in New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina(9). His wife was Mary Frances Porter (1785-1819). (She would be known as Frances). They would have three children:

(a) Thornton Gray (1802-1850). Thornton would marry Elizabeth Ann Russell (1829-1917). She was the daughter of William Russell (1800-1835) and Rhoda Elizabeth (surname unknown). [Note: This is the source of the Rhoda name in the Spence family!] Their children were:

(i) Mary Gray, b. 1844;
(ii) Thomas Russell Gray (b. 1848);
(iii) Elizabeth Frances Gray (b. 1850)(10)

Thornton Gray (b. 1775) died in McCracken County, Kentucky after the 1850 Census. His wife–Elizabeth Ann Russell–will reappear in the next entry.

3. Charles Porter Gray (1819-1890). Charles was born October 27, 1819 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died April 4, 1890 in Albany, Clinton, Kentucky. His mother died in childbirth while delivering him. After his mother’s death, his father Thornton Gray remarried. The name of his wife is unknown, but she may have been a widow with children. By 1820, Thornton moved his family to New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina, where they appear on the 1820 Census. Thornton Sr. died before the 1830 Census was taken. Charles became a lawyer, and he settled in Albany, Clinton, Kentucky. Shortly after his brother Thornton’s death in 1850, Charles married Thornton’s widow that same year–Elizabeth Ann Russell (1829-1917). Their children were:

(i)Rhoda C. Gray (Tuggle) (1852-1921)
(ii) Lucy G. Gray (b. 1855)
(iii) Mary Frances Gray (1857-1937)
(iv) William N. Gray (b. 1860)
(v) Shel C. Gray (1862-1892)
(vi) Susan H. Gray (Noland) (1865-1935)
(vii) Nancy E. Gray (b. 1867)
(viii) Amanda T. Gray (b. 1871)
(ix) James McAllen Gray (1874-1953)(11)

Elizabeth Ann Russell Gray died December 26, 1917 in Celina, Clay, Tennessee.

The other children of Thornton Gray (1729-1776) and Elizabeth are identified in his will abstract. As yet, I have not discovered dates for them:

Name
Thornton Gray

Probate Year
1776

Estimated Death Year
Abt 1776

Full Abstract
1776 GRAY, THORNTON, Elizabeth (wife); Judah, Catherine, Julia, Barthema, Thornton(12).

Julia is Juliana/Julian, the wife of Samuel Spence (1760-1805)

***

Contrary to my presumption in Part Four, Levi James Spence did not go to Perry County, Tennessee in 1820 with his brothers, Samuel and Daniel. The Thornton Gray family, including Levi’s beloved Elizabeth, planned to head back to North Carolina. Levi wasn’t going to risk losing her to someone else. So he went to North Carolina with the Grays, where he appears on the 1820 Census in Lenoir County. Thornton set him up there with relatives, but Levi was back in Pasquotank County every weekend. He and Elizabeth were married in New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina in 1824. After Thornton’s death, they returned to Tennessee and settled in Madison County.

The children of Levi James Spence and Elizabeth Gray follow:

1. James Russell Spence (1825-aft 1900). James Russell Spence was born May 16, 1825 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died after 1900 in Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky. On April 15, 1852, he married Nancy Jane Moore (1831-1877) in McCracken County, Kentucky. Their children were: (a) Albert H. Spence, b. 1853; (b) Malcolm G. “Mack” Spence, b 1855; (c) Medora “Dora” Spence, b. 1857; (d) Eugene Spence, b. 1860; (e) William Spence, b. 1864; (f) James Samuel Spence, b. 1869. His second wife was Sarah Byard (b. 1846). They had one daughter: Flossie Spence (b. 1879). Sarah was a widow and had a son by her previous marriage: Henry C. Byard (b. 1872)
2. Thornton Spence, b. 1827. He may have died young. I can find nothing else about him.
3. Mark Spence (1829-1852). Mark was born May 17, 1829 in Madison County, Tennessee, and he died of cholera in St. Louis, Missouri on September 27, 1852. He appears to have remained single.
4. William W. Spence (1832-1910). William was born January 17, 1832 in Tennessee, and he died after 1910 in Paducah, McCracken, Kentucky. He married Mary Ann Moore (1833-1920) on October 26, 1859 in McCracken County Kentucky. Their children were: (a) John W. Spence (1861-1924); and (b) Thomas Duncan Spence (1865-1947).
5. Joseph Martin Spence (1834-1914). Joseph was born October 26, 1834 in Graves County, Kentucky, and he died June 13, 1914 in Oxford, Sumner County, Kansas. On August 27, 1856, he married Elizabeth Jane Browning (1836-1906) in McCracken County, Kentucky. Their children were: (a) William Henry Spence, who was born August 20, 1857 in McCracken County, Kentucky and who died in 1925 in Oxford, Sumner, Kansas; (b)Jacob A. “Jack” Spence, who was born November 1861 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died in 1925 in Sumner County, Kansas; (c) Thomas Spence (1863-1935), who was born March 24, 1863 in Paducah, McCracken, Kentucky, and who died December 13, 1935 in Arcadia, Oklahoma; (d) James Eli Spence (Eli James Spence–he used the name Eli), who was born September 1864 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died before 1910 in Guthrie, Logan, Oklahoma; (e) Mary June Spence, who was born September 1866 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died in 1942 in Oxford, Sumner, Kansas; (f) Deelan B Spence, who was born June 1870 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died before 1880 in McCracken County, Kentucky; (g) Lou Ella Spence, who was born about 1872 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died after 1880 in McCracken County, Kentucky; (h) Lottie Spence, who was born October 1, 1874 in Paducah, McCracken, Kentucky, and who died August 14, 1955 in Kansas.
5. Elizabeth Frances Spence (1836-1925). Elizabeth was born in Kentucky December 22, 1836, and she died in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 31, 1925. On January 29, 1857, she married John William Wyatt (1829-1876) in McCracken County, Kentucky. Their children were: (a) Medora Mary Wyatt (1857-1884); (b) Virginia E. Wyatt, born 1860; (c) James Lewis Wyatt (1862-1935); (d) John Melvin Wyatt (1866-1949); (e) Allen A. Wyatt, b. 1873.
6. Thomas J. (James) Spence (1839-1928). Thomas was born May 9, 1839 in Tennessee, and he died April 15, 1928 in Sumner County, Kansas. His wife’s name was Malena. Their children were: (a) James C. Spence (1867-1947); (b) Thomas Levi Spence (1871-1930); (c) Fannie M. Spence, born 1879; (d) William P. Spence, born 1884.
7. Littleton F. Spence (1843-1876). Littleton was born about 1843 in Kentucky, and he died January 19, 1876 in McCracken County, Kentucky. His wife was Alice B. Crawford (1848-1916). They had one known child: Edward Spence, who was born in October 1869 in McCracken County, Kentucky(13).

Howard and I lived in Bowling Green Kentucky from 1969 until 1970. We drove through Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky numerous times while traveling between Bowling Green and Farmington, Missouri in order to visit Howard’s parents. I did not realize I had all these ancestors living in McCracken County! My Grandfather Spence once thought his father’s family originated in Kentucky. They didn’t, but a large number of family members certainly settled there!

***

When Levi and Elizabeth Gray Spence returned to Tennessee, they settled in Madison County, where they appear on the 1830 Censes(14). Elizabeth’s brother, Thornton Gray (1802-1850) had settled in Jefferson County, Kentucky, where he appears on the 1830 Censes. By 1843, Thornton moved to McCracken County, where he married Elizabeth Ann Russell (1829-1917)(15). Levi and Elizabeth’s first four children were born in Madison County, Tennessee but in 1834, the family made a sojourn into Kentucky, where Joseph Martin Spence was born in Graves County. From there, the family moved to McCracken County, Kentucky, where Elizabeth’s brother, Thornton, lived. Then in 1840, Levi and his family moved to Weakley County, Tennessee, where they appear on the Census that year. The youngest son Littleton was born in Weakley County in 1843. In 1840, Elizabeth Gray Spence’s younger brother, Charles Porter Gray (1819-1890) was living in Williamson County, Tennessee, where he appears as married with a young son and daughter under the age of five(16). This would have been his first family; I do not know their names, and I do not believe they survived. Levi James Spence moved to Weakley County because a younger brother (William) had settled there. He and his family had returned to North Carolina, and then moved back to Tennessee.

Levi James Spence died in Weakley County, Tennessee in 1843. His wife, Elizabeth Gray, returned to McCracken County, Kentucky shortly after his death. She appears on the 1850 Census with her children: James (age 24); William W. (age 18); Joseph M. (age 15); Elizabeth F. (age 13); Thomas J. (age 11); Littleton F. (age 7)(17). She appears on the 1880 Census for Woodville, McCracken, Kentucky, and she lived there the last three years of her life(18). She died November 28, 1883, and she is buried in the New Liberty Cemetery, Woodville, McCracken County, Tennessee(19).

To Be Continued in Part Six

References

(1) Alexander Gray in Scotland Select Marriages, 1561-1910 about Alexander Gray. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Alexander Gray in Scotland Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1960. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) One World Ancestral Trees, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) Alexander Gray in the UK Extracted Probate Records, 1269-1975. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Griffen Gray and Thornton Gray on the Militia Roster for 1775, Pasquotank County, North Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) North Carolina Will Abstract for Thornton Gray (1776), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7)Julian Gray/Samuel Spence Marriage Record, North Carolina Marriage Records, 1741-2011. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8)Samuel Spence Last Will & Testament (1805), Microfilmed opy obtained from the North Carolina State Library and Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.
(9)1830 Census about Thornton Gray, New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10)1850 Census about Thornton Gray (b. 1802), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11)1860 Census about Charles Porter Gray, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12)North Carolina Will Abstract for Thornton Gray (1776), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14)1830 Census for Levi Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15)1830 Census for Thornton Gray, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16)1840 Census for Charles P. Gray, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17)1850 Census for Elizabeth Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18)1880 Census for Elizabeth Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) Elizabeth Spence Find-a-Grave Memorial #117184444, Find-a-Grave.com Website. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Four: Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859) and Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872)

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Samuel Perry Spence was born in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1800. He was named Samuel for Samuel Inman and Perry for his paternal grandmother, Judha Perry Spence Jones, Elisha’s mother. The 1800 Census for Greenville County, South Carolina indicates a family similar to Elisha’s in the John Spencer Household(1). However, the young family had already been making plans to relocate to Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, where Elisha Spence also appears in 1800(2). [Note: Thomas J. Spencer would die in Greenville in 1810. That same year, Levi Spencer relocated to Sevier County, Tennessee. A woman Caroline Toney Spencer’s age appears in his household in Tennessee. However, a woman of Caroline’s age appears in the Abraham Spencer household in Greenville County in 1810. And there is a possibility that Caroline may have returned to Virginia prior to relocating to Georgia with Levi.] The year following their move to Mecklenburg County, a second child was born to Elisha and Susannah. Levi James Spence was born in Mecklenburg County in 1801. He was named for Susannah’s brother, Levi Spencer, and for Elisha’s favorite uncle, James Spence. After Susannah and Levi were able to travel, the Elisha Spence family moved to Randolph County, North Carolina, where the James Spence family still lived.

From a very early time, Samuel Perry Spence was surrounded with large groups of families and extended families in the area. After they settled in Randolph, Elisha was able to reconnect with the David and Daniel Jones families as well. By 1804, the Jones families departed for Davidson County, Tennessee–something the Spence and Spencer families would do by 1810. When the Spence family moved to Tennessee, they would reconnect with the Inman family and the Daniel Jones family. [As noted in a previous article, David Jones died before April 1806 in Davidson County, Tennessee(3).] John David Spencer, Susannah’s brother, settled in Stewart County, Tennessee, where he appears on the 1810 Census(4). By 1820, John Spencer relocated to Perry County, Tennessee, where he appears on the Census as living close to the Samuel Inman family(5). And by 1820, Samuel Perry Spence, his brother, Daniel Spence, and possibly Levi J. Spence, had moved to Perry County where they were living with their uncle. Some young men their ages appear in the John Spencer household that year.

On May 25, 1824, Samuel Spence married Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872)–the daughter of Samuel and Mary Williams Inman–in Davidson County, Tennessee(6). They were living in Perry County, Tennessee at the time and there is no return date on the marriage license. In all likelihood, they had to travel to Davidson County to get the license. The wedding was in Perry County, and no return date was filed. The story of Elizabeth’s Inman family is found in Part Three of this series, so I will not repeat it all here.

Samuel Perry Spence and Elizabeth Inman had the following children: [Note: I will introduce them here and detail some of them in a later article.]

A set of twins:
1. Susannah “Susan” Diane Spence (1825-1830). Susan was born July 31, 1825 in Perry County, Tennessee[7], and she died after the 1830 Census in Perry County, Tennessee.

2. Lazarus Spence (1825-1902). Lazarus was born July 31, 1825 in Perry County, Tennessee(8) and he died November 15, 1902 in Jasper County, Missouri(9). He was known as “Laz” Spence. On December 3, 1848, he married Adeline Elizabeth Bryant (1833-1931) in Jasper County, Missouri(10) [Note: The wedding license is December 3, 1848. The actual ceremony took place December 23, 1848]. She was the daughter of Daniel Bryant (1803-1858) and Lucy Key (1810-1903). They had no natural children but adopted two daughters: Marion Elizabeth Vermillion Spence (1858-1926) and Martha Jane Vermillion Spence (1860-1915)(11).
—-
Another set of twins:
3. William David Spence (1827-1907). [My second-great grandfather] William David was born October 27, 1827 in Perry County, Tennessee(12), and he died April 26, 1907(13) in Jasper County, Missouri. He was known as “Dave” Spence. On October 30, 1850, William David married Manerva Caroline Hood (1824-1901) in Jasper County, Missouri(14). She was the daughter of Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)(12). Their children were (a) John Newton Spence (1850-1930); (b) Thomas Jefferson Spence (1853-1911); (c) Salathiel Monroe Spence (1854-1921)–my great-grandfather; (d) Harriet V. Spence (1856-1906); (e) George Washington Spence (1858-1930); (f) William Joseph Spence (1861-1938); (g) Joel C. Spence (1863-1955); (h) Nancy Adeline “Nannie” Spence (1866-1948); (i) Elizabeth J. “Lizzie” Spence (1866-1952)

4. Samuel Elisha Spence (1827-1840). Samuel was born October 27, 1827 in Perry County, Tennessee(15), and he died after the 1840 Census in Jasper County, Missouri(16)
—-
5. Rebecca Jane Spence (1828-1859). Rebecca was born in 1828 in Perry County, Tennessee(17), and she died in 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri(18). On August 29, 1858, Rebecca married George Washington Triplett (1825-1909) in Jasper County, Missouri(19). He was the son of John Hore Triplett (1804-1882) and Mary Butler Bradley (1807-1875). They had no children, although Rebecca may have died in childbirth. George married Floraetta Piety Frye (1855-1931) in Pineville, McDonald County, Missouri on January 19, 1873. Their children were: (a) William Elzey Triplett (1874-1932); (b) Mary J. Triplett (1877-1880); (c) Alta Laura Triplett (1881-1979); (d) Anna Margaret Triplett (1888-1925); (e) Elmer Allen Triplett (1888-1925)

6. Milly Catherine Spence (1837-1896). Milly was born January 27, 1837 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died August 28, 1896 in Jane, McDonald County, Missouri(20). On July 26, 1855, Milly Catherine married James Henry Bunch (1834-1929) in Jasper County, Missouri(21). He was the son of Eli Bunch (1795-1872) and Nancy Bullington (1800-1852). Their children were: (a) Elvira F. Bunch (1856-1934); (b) Nancy Elizabeth Bunch (1858-1941); (c) Nimrod P. Bunch (b. 1864); (d) William Henry Bunch (1867-1880); (e) Sarah K. Bunch (1873-1880).

7. Newton Jasper Spence (1841-1882). Newton was born July 4, 1841 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died May 18, 1882 in Milburn, Johnson County, Oklahoma(22). His wife was Mary Jane Brooks (1850-1880), whom he married about 1868 in Oklahoma. She was the daughter of John and Martha Brooks. Their children were: (a) Newton Jacob Spence (1869-1954); (b) Alice Bell Spence (1871-1913); (c) Mary Jane Spence (1873-1959); (d) John Jasper Spence (1875-1954); (e) Martha Elizabeth “Daisy” Spence (1877-1934); (f) James Louis Spence (1878-1934).

8. Sarah Elizabeth Spence (1843-1912). Sarah was born January 1, 1843 in Jasper County, Missouri(23), and she died July 3, 1912 in Vernon, Wilbarger, Texas(24). She was married to John Hull (1844-1908) in Grayson County, Texas. He was the son of John Hull (1798-1858) and Sarah St. Clair. Their children were: (a) Sophia Hull (1870-1953); (b) Millicent Catherine Hull (1872-1953); (c) Belle Hull (b. 1877); (d) Connie Hull (b. 1884); (e) Mary Hull; (f) Mable Hull; (g) Lizzie Hull; (h) Johnnie Hull.

9. Louis (Lewis) Wesley Spence (1844-1890). Louis was born December 10, 1844 in Jasper County, Missouri(25), and he died May 16, 1890 in Prairie Grove Twp., Washington County, Arkansas. On March 31, 1875, he married Amanda Miranda “Mandy” Taylor (1855-1921) in Washington County, Arkansas(26). They had two children: (1) Annie M. Spence (1876-1894); and (2) Samuel Lee Spence (b. 1877).

Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence remained in Perry County, Tennessee until 1836 or 1837. His sister, Milly Catherine, and his brother, Daniel, preceded him in relocating to Jasper County, Missouri. The oldest son of Elisha and Susanna, Samuel probably waited behind to settle his father’s affairs. And then his family headed west to Missouri, where they joined the others, leaving Tennessee behind.

To Be Continued In Part Five

References

(1) 1800 Census for John Spencer, Greenville County, South Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 15 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) 1800 Census for Elisha Spence, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. National Archives Census Film. Accessed at the Denver Public Library, Denver, Colorado.
(3) David Jones Estate Inventory, April 1806. Roll 427, Book 3 (1805-1816), Davidson County, Tennessee Probate Records. Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.
(4) John David Spencer, 1810 Census for Stewart County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) John Spencer, 1820 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Tennessee Marriages to 1825 about Samuel Spence and Elizabeth Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Family Data Collection, Births, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8),(9),(10),(11) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index about Lazarus Spence, Maintained by: Margaret Pickett, Originally Created by: Linda Record added: Jan 23, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 33162562. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(12),(13) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index about William David Spence, Created by: Dr. Barbara Inman Beall
Record added: Mar 03, 2010 Find A Grave Memorial# 49050430. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(14) Jasper County, Missouri Marriage Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) 1830 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) 1840 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17) 1850 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18) 1860 Census for George Triplett, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index about Milly Catherine Spence Bunch, Created by: Dr. Barbara Inman Beall, Record added: Jul 29, 2005, Find A Grave Memorial# 11444497. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(21) Missouri Marriage Records, 1805, 2002, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(22) Family Data Collection, Individual Records about Newton Jasper Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(23) 1850 Census about Sarah E. Spence, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(24) Find-a-Grave Index about Sarah E. Hull, Created by: Rita Osborne,Record added: Jun 07, 2014,
Find A Grave Memorial# 131016388. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(25) 1850 Census about Lewis Spence, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(26) Arkansas Marriage Records (1820-1949), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.