Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Nine: Daniel Spence (1806-1857) and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859)–The Pewitt and Inman Families

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

 

Daniel Spence was born in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1806 to Elisha and Susanna Spencer Spence, and he died in Jasper County, Missouri in 1857.  He was possibly named for the father of Lewis Jones–Daniel Jones–who had relocated to Tennessee before the Spences. The earliest Jasper County, Missouri pioneers are buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery, many of them without tombstones. Such is the case for Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence, Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones, and Daniel and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt Spence.  Their names appear on the pioneer marker at the entrance of the cemetery, along with many others.

Daniel was around four years of age when his family moved from North Carolina to Davidson County, Tennessee in early 1810.  Unlike his older siblings who experienced moving from place to place–this was a completely new experience for young Daniel.  He undoubtedly imagined all sorts of things as they traveled through the woods. After the family settled in Tennessee, young Daniel became adjusted to his new environment.

To date I haven’t found the exact location where the Elisha Spence family settled in Davidson County, Tennessee.  Williamson County was carved from Davidson in 1799, and I believe the Elisha Spence family lived on the border between the two counties. Elisha and his family spent as much time in Williamson as they did in Davidson. Associated families all resided in the  Davidson and Williamson County area.

The move to Tennessee was not without sorrow and precipitated an event that occurred  late summer or early fall in 1810. Elisha and Susannah had a child every year or every other year. When they moved to Tennessee, Susannah had a set of twins born March 28, 1809, and she was pregnant again when they started their journey. The Spences had buried another child born in 1807 or 1808 in North Carolina. That child will be discussed Elisha Spence: Part 11. Susannah’s last child was born late August or early September 1810, and Susannah died in childbirth. The loss of their mother introduced a nanny into the household, a young woman by the name of Mary Jane Bell (1795-1842). She was the daughter of Capt. Robert Bell of Guilford County, North Carolina (1736-1816) and his first wife–Mary Jane Boyd (1754-1795). Jane’s mother had died in childbirth while giving birth to her!

On October 10, 1810, Elisha Spence and Jane Bell were married in Davidson County, Tennessee(1).  The following year, their first child arrived followed by three additional children through 1826. The house became quite crowded and by 1820, the three older children–Samuel, Milly Catherine, and Daniel–relocated to Perry County, Tennessee to live with John David Spencer, one of their mother’s brothers(2). Their other brother, Levi James Spence, had returned to North Carolina and was living in Lenoir County in 1820(3). Samuel became enamored with Elizabeth Inman 1808-1872), daughter of Samuel Inman (1772-1830) and Mary Williams (1774-1830).  They were married in Davidson County, Tennessee on May 10, 1824(4). Milly Catherine had already beaten them to the altar. On February 2, 1820, she married Lewis Jones (1795-1849) in Davidson County, Tennessee(5). Daniel divided his time between the Lewis Jones and Samuel Spence households and finally returned to Davidson County. He had his own conquest to make, and she lived in Williamson County!

The Pewitt Family

Road sign regarding early history of Leipers Fork, Williamson County, Tennessee

Road sign regarding early history of Leiper’s Fork, Williamson County, Tennessee. Sign lists the early pioneer families who settled there.

Two populated places in Williamson County, Tennessee are important to this narrative. The first is Leiper’s Fork, and the second is Fernvale, which was mentioned earlier in the Levi James Spence article. Both places are close to each other, and are also close to Franklin.

According to a Leiper’s Fork, Tennessee Wikipedia entry:

Leiper’s Fork is located along the Natchez Trace, which was an important travel route for Native Americans and early European-American settlers. The area was settled in the late 1700s by settlers from North Carolina and Virginia who had received land grants as payment for service in the American Revolution. Colonel Jesse Steed received a land grant of 2,504 acres (1,013 ha) that includes the site of the village. He sold the area to Jesse Benton, who established a homestead. His son, Thomas Hart Benton, who later was to become U.S. Senator from Missouri, moved the family there in 1801 after his father’s death. Natchez Trace travelers called the community around the Benton homestead Bentontown, but over time the area came to be called Hillsboro.

In 1818, a post office was established in the community. Apparently the Hillsboro name was already in use for a community in Coffee County, so the post office was given the name of Leiper’s Fork for the stream that runs through the village. The namesake of Leiper’s Fork creek was one of two brothers: Hugh Leiper, who completed an early land survey in the area, or Captain James Leiper, who died in the Battle of the Bluffs at Fort Nashborough in 1781.

Growth of the village was stimulated by traffic on the Natchez Trace. Largely as a result of its transportation access, Leiper’s Fork was historically the center of trade for western Williamson County and the center of religious and social activities in the area.

The Leiper’s Fork post office operated until 1918(6).

A highway sign (pictured here) identifies names of the earliest settlers in the area:

Situated on the Natchez Trace, the village and stream were named for pioneer surveyor Hugh Leiper. The Adams, Benton, Bond, Carl, Cummins, Davis, Dobbins, Hunter, Medows, Parham, Southall and Wilkens families were early settlers. Later, the Sweeney, Inman, Locke, Lunn, Mayberry, Martin, Jones and Burdette families lived here. Leipers Fork had a post office from 1818 until 1908, a bank from 1902 until 1932, and a station on the 41.5 mile long Middle Tennessee Railroad from 1909 until 1927. Hillsboro Academy (1890-1904), established by Professor Will Anderson, became a public school in 1905(7).

Fernvale is a populated place where the Harpeth Furnace is located.  There are also a number of cemeteries in the area: Inman Cemetery, which is two miles south of Fernvale,  Bryant Cemetery, which is eighteen miles to the south southwest of Fernvale, Buchanan Cemetery, which is fifteen miles to the East of Fernvale, and Childress cemetery, which is nineteen miles to the east of Fernvale (located in Maury County). There are three Gray Cemeteries: one that is 25 miles to the east of Fernvale (located in Davidson County); one that is seven miles east southeast of Fernvale; and, one (Gray’s Bend) that is located twenty-one miles to the west southwest of Fernvale (located in Hickman County.) A Graham Cemetery is located twenty-two miles to the west of Fernvale in Hickman County. Other names of importance to this narrative include Adams, Alexander (5 cemeteries), Hood, Hughes, Hunter, Jones (there are 10 of those!), Jordan, Martin (6 cemeteries), Moss (2 cemeteries), Russell (2 cemeteries), Smith (5 cemeteries), Taylor (3 cemeteries), Temple (2 cemeteries), Thornton (2 cemeteries), Wall (2 cemeteries), Williams (7 cemeteries), Wilson (4 cemeteries), and others(8).

Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt was born in 1810 in Williamson County, Tennessee to Joel “Jack” Pewitt (1779-1823) and Susannah “Sukey” Adams (1786-1848). Her father’s family came from Lunenburg County, Virginia, while her mother’s family came from Chatham County, North Carolina.

Joel “Jack” Pewitt was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia in 1779, and he died August 13, 1823 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee. He was the son of Joel Pewitt, Sr., who was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia in 1745 and who died in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1797, and Anne Blackwell (1743-1783).  The children of Joel Pewitt, Sr. and Anne Blackwell follow:

  1. Thomas Pewitt (1761/90-unknown). Thomas was born between 1761 and 1790 in Lunenburg, Virginia, and he died in Tennessee. The date of his death is unknown. He may have died young.
  2. John Pewitt (1761/90-1823). John was born between 1761 and 1790 in Lunenburg, Virginia, and he died there in 1823. His wife was Nancy Erskine Crenshaw (b. 1782). Their children were:
      1. Joel B. Pewitt (1814-1889). Joel was born in Virginia, and he died in Humphreys County, Tennessee.  His first wife was Emily Radford (1820-1854). Their children were: (a) William Pettus Pewitt (1841-1926); (b) Columbus A. Pewitt (1844-1922); (c) Thaddeus F. Pewitt (b. 1847); (d) Mary Elizabeth Pewitt (1849-1881); (e) Martha V. Pewitt (b. 1851); (f) Susan A. Pewitt (b. 1854).  His second wife was Mary Jane Coleman (1830-1895). Their children were: (a) Samuel W. Pewitt (b. 1863); (b) Robert Blackwell Pewitt (1865-1932);  (c) Thomas H. Pewitt (b. 1867); (d) Lou Ada Pewitt (1872-1944).
      2. Mary Elizabeth Pewitt (1816-1900). Mary was born March 1816 in Lunenberg, Virginia, and she died after 1900 in Humphreys County, Tennessee. Her husband was John James Russell (b. abt 1818). I haven’t proven this as yet, but I believe John connects with the same Russell family mentioned in the Levi James Spence article. Their children were: (a) Sarah E. Russell (b. 1842); (b) Nancy W. Russell (b. 1845); (c) John Henry Russell (1848-1914); (d) Mary C. Russell (b. 1849); (e) Tabitha Frances Russell (1853-1925); (f) Franklin Pierce Russell (1870-1935).
  3. Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr. (1779-1823). Under discussion here.
  4. Adam Jackson Pewitt (1803-1854). Adam was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1803, and he died January 15, 1854 in Haywood County, Tennessee. His wife was Barbary Smith (1797-1860). Their children were: (a) Andrew J. Pewitt (1833-1910). Andrew relocated to Arkansas and died in Pope County; (b) Wyatt Elliott Pewitt (b. 1839); (c) an unknown child.
  5. James Blackwell Pewitt (1780-1822). James was born in Lunenberg County, Virginia in 1780, and he died May 30, 1822 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He and his brother Joel “Jack” settled together in Williamson County, Tennessee.  His wife was Catherine Andes (1782-1822). Their children were:
    1. Adam Jackson Pewitt (1803-1854). Adam was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1803, and he died in Haywood County, Tennessee on January 15, 1854. His wife was Barbary Smith (1797-1860) Their children were: (a) Andrew J. Pewitt (1833-1910); (b) Wyatt Elliott Pewitt (b. 1839); (c) an unknown child.
    2. Lewis Pewitt (1805-1850). Lewis was born in 1805 in Williamson County, and he died after 1850 in Laclede County, Missouri. His wife was Martha Patsy Cook (b. 1814). Their children were: (a) Catherine Pewett (b. 1833); (b) Martha Jane Pewitt (1835-1916); (c) Adam Pewitt (1837-1840); (d) Nancy Pewitt (1839-1915); (e) Barbary E. Pewitt (b. 1847); (f) Joseph Andes Pewitt (1847-1904); (g) James Pewitt (b. 1850); (h) Lewis E. Pewett (b. 1850); (I) Mary Pewitt (b. 1851); (j) William G. Pewitt (no additional information).
    3. Henry Pewitt (1807-1881). Henry was born May 15, 1807 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died July 22, 1881 in Fulton County, Kentucky. His wife was Rebecca Williamson (1814-1864). Their children were: (a) Barbara L. Pewitt (1828-1856); (b) Hartwell Pewitt (1830-1917); (c) Rev. Malachi Pewitt (1832-1909); (d) Harvey S. “Harry” Pewitt (1834-1899); (e) Minerva (Mauriva) Pewitt (1838-1859); (f) Adam W. Pewitt (1839-1840); (g) William Adam Pewitt (1839-1910); (h) Polly P. Pewitt (1841-1842); (I) Mary Elizabeth Polly Pewitt (1841-1914); (j) James H. Pewitt (1844-1871); (k) Judy W. Pewitt (1846-1847); (l) Rebecca J. Pewitt (1848-1849); (m) Amanda Pewitt (1850-1860). His second wife was Elizabeth Parker (1813-1898)
    4. Anna  Mariah Mae Pewitt (1808-1885). She was born in Tennessee. I have no additional information about her.
    5. James Pewitt (1809-1854). James was born September 2, 1809 in Tennessee, and he died January 15, 1854 in Williamson County, Tennessee. His wife was Sarah Adams (1808-1866). They had a daughter: Sarah Jane Pewitt (1839-1890).
    6. John Andes Pewitt (1812-1890). John was born January 12, 1812 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee, and he died in 1890 in Sand Mountain, Bibb County, Alabama. His wife was Rebecca Elizabeth Givens (1817-1874). Their children were: (a) Mary Ann Polly Pewitt (1838-1889); (b) Adam Pewitt (1839-1910); (c) Thomas Pewitt (1842-1862); (d) Sarah Francis Pewitt (1843-1904); (e) George Martin Pewitt (1846-1910); (f) Judy A. Pewitt (1847-1923); (g) Jeremiah Samuel “Jerry” Pewitt (1851-1931); (h) James Martin Pewitt (1852-1933); (I) Nancy C. Pewitt (1858-1940).
    7. Barbara Pewitt (1814-1887). Barbara was born February 9, 1814 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and she died October 18, 1887 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee. Her first marriage was to her first cousin: Joseph Pewitt (1810-1840). Joseph was a son of Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr (1779-1823) and Susannah Suckey Adams (1786-1848) and a brother of Mary Ann Polly Pewitt (1810-1859)–the wife of Daniel Spence. Their children were: (a) Mary E. Pewitt (1826-1887); (b) Mary Ann Pewitt (1830-1887) [Note: there may have been two Marys, or this may be one person with different dates of birth]; (c) Joseph Pewitt (b. 1831); (d) Catherine Susan Pewitt (1831-1880); (e) Adeline Pewitt (b. 1833); (f) William Maxfield Pewitt (1835-1865); (g) Minerva B. Pewitt (1837-1860); (h) Cora Pewitt (b. 1840); (I) Fanny Pewitt (b. 1840). Barbara’s second marriage was to Granville Grantz Inman (1820-1902). He was the son of John Lazarus Inman (1793-1859) and Sarah Kirby (1795-1870); the grandson of  Lazarus Inman (1765-1850) and Susannah Stovall (1765-1850); and the great grandson of Meshach Inman (1749-1771) of the Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego Inman fame. [I’ve already discussed this Inman family in Part Three of the Elisha Spence series: The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family.  This Inman family will reappear shortly.] The children of Barbara Pewitt and Granville Grantz Inman were: (a) James Wesley Inman (1843-1898); (b) Sarah J. Inman (1844-1914); (c) Nancy C. Inman (b. 1846); (d) Henry Clay Inman (b. 1846); (e) Barbara Ann (or Allen) Inman (1849-1908); (f) John T. Inman (1851-1934); (g) Adam A. Inman (1853-1929); (h) Minerva Inman (b. 1860); (I) Monroe S. Inman (1860-1897).  After Barbara’s death, Granville married Catherine Pyner (1818-1897).James Blackwell Pewitt (1780-1822). James settled in Williamson County, Tennessee with his brother, Joel “Jack.” He was born in Lunenberg, Virginia in 1780, and he died May 30, 1822 in Williamson County, Tennessee. (Before I go any further, I will be citing a document that can cause a problem if you don’t probe into it. It is called Tennessee Divorce and Other Records (1800-1965). It is actually a collection of many different types of records including divorce and probate. The records I needed were all probate records.  There is one divorce I will discuss later on in this article, but it is the only divorce I am aware of.)  James’ wife was Catherine Andes (1782-1822). Their children were:
      1. Hartwell Pewitt (1785-1843). Hartwell was born about 1785 in Lunenberg, Virginia, and he died in 1843 in Monroe County, Arkansas. His wife was Edney/Edna Halstead Gray (1785-1835).  Their children were: (a) Ephraim Pewitt (b. 1817); (b) Calvin Pewitt (b. 1819); (c) Rebecca Pewitt (b. 1821); (d) Amanda Pewitt (1824-1855); (e) Eveline/Evaline Pewitt (1829-1852); (f) Mary Elizabeth Pewitt (1835-1878). [Note: Edna Gray was from the same Gray line depicted in the Levi James Spence article. She was a sister of Daniel Gray, who is discussed in the next section.)
      2. Nancy Pewitt (1788-1874). Nancy was born in Lunenberg, Virginia in 1788, and she died in Bastrop, Texas in 1874. Her husband was Daniel Gray (1787-1848). [Note: This is the same Gray family depicted in the Levi James Spence article. Daniel was a brother of Edna Gray, who married Hartwell Pewitt (see previous section). Daniel and Edna Gray were children of Deliverance Gray (1767-1840) and Palmer Tamer Koen Halstead (1760-1788). Deliverance was a son of Anthony Gray (1750-1803/4) and Polly Jordan 1754-1804), and a grandson of Nathaniel Dwight Gray (1744-1777) and Mary Jane Parker (1744-1799).] The children of Nancy Pewitt and Daniel Gray were: (a) John Wesley Gray (1812-1854); (b) Joshua Gray (1814-1836); (c) Ann Blackwell Gray (b. 1818); (d) Rebecca Gray (1822-1850); (e) Joseph Leonard Gray (1824-1863); (f) Sarah W. Gray (b. 1827); (g) Mary Jane Gray (1832-1855).

Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr. (1779-1823), Susannah “Suckey” Adams (1786-1848) and the Inman Family

In the early-to-mid 1990s, I traveled back and forth to Denver aboard a local bus. This was during the period of time prior to the availability of Echo Passes for the Express and Regional busses. I didn’t mind the locals. The trip took much longer than the Express, but it was during this period of time when I did a lot of reading. One book I remember in particular was called The Civil War in Missouri (1861-1865) or something similar to that title.  After finding the surname Inman in the index, I checked out the book from the campus library and focused on the entry.

According to the footnote, an incident took place outside Houston in Texas, County, Missouri concerning a bushwhacker by the name of John Inman. The Union Army wanted to capture him and eventually caught him near Houston. That night, John Inman escaped, and Union soldiers shot and killed him.

Well, of course the name intrigued me. And during my next trip to the library, I discovered a number of Inmans resided in Texas and in Dent Counties, Missouri . I thought they may have been related to my third great grandmother, Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872), wife of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859). But if so, how?

Only recently did I discover my answer!

Joel “Jack” Pewitt, Jr. (1779-1823) was born in Lunenberg County, Virginia in 1779, and he died August 13, 1823 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee. As already noted, he was a son of Joel Pewitt (1745-1797) and Anne Blackwell (1743-1797). His wife was Susannah Suckey Adams (1786-1848). She was the daughter of Thomas A. Adams (1755-1823) and Sarah Anna Vaughn (1755-1806). The children of Joel and Susannah Adams Pewitt follow:

  1. Winna Pewitt (b. 1804). Winna was born in 1804 in Williamson County, Tennessee. She died at an unknown date in Williamson County.
  2. Thomas Pewitt (1806-1847). Thomas was born in 1806 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1847 in Lawrence County, Arkansas. His wife was Tryphenia Thania Smith (1805-1832). Their children were: (a) John Smith Pewitt (1831-1864); (b) Elizabeth S. Pewitt (b. 1833); (c) Mary Ann Pewitt (b. 1834); (d) Nancy M. Pewett (b. 1838); (e) Tryphenia I Pewitt (b. 1840); (f) Thomas I. Pewitt (b. 1843); (g) Permilia Pewitt (1846-1938).
  3. James Pewitt (1809-1854). James was born in Tennessee September 2, 1809, and he died In Williamson County, Tennessee January 15, 1854. His wife was Sarah Adams (1808-1866). They had one known daughter:  Sarah Jane Pewitt (1839-1890).
  4. Joseph Pewitt (1810-1840). He was discussed in the James Blackwell Pewitt section since he married James’ daughter, Barbara.
  5. Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859). (If the birth dates are correct, she and her brother, Joseph, were twins.) Wife of Daniel Spence (1806-1857). They will be discussed in Part 10.
  6. Nancy M. Pewitt (1814-1869). Nancy was born in 1814 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and she died about 1869 in Dent County, Missouri. Her husband was Henry C. Duke (1812-1870). Their children were: (a) Malachi Duke (b. 1833); (b) Emily Duke (b. 1837); (c) Robert Duke (b. 1839); (d) Susannah Duke (b. 1842); (e) William Duke (b. 1844); (f) Lavinia Duke (b. 1848).
  7. Malachi Pewitt (1816-1882). Malachi was born in Williamson County, Tennessee July 12, 1816, and he died October 25, 1882 in Dry Fork, Dent County, Missouri. His wife was Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Inman (1820-1854). She was a daughter of Ezekiel Inman (1796-1862) and Lillis Hester Edgar (1798-1873), a granddaughter of Lazarus Inman (1765-1850) and Susannah Stovall (1765-1850),  a great granddaughter of Meshach Inman (1749-1771), and a sister of Annis (Annas) Inman (1832-1855), who married Laban Pewitt (1821-1869). The children of Malachi Inman and Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Inman were: (a) William Washington Pewitt (1837-1919); (b) Sousanah  Malinda Pewitt (1839-1871); (c) Nancy Jane Pewitt (1842-1935); (d) Joel Pewitt (b. 1845). Malachi’s second wife was Juretta Catherine Medlock (1833-1900). Their children were: (a) David Pewitt, born 1856; (b) Mary Albertine “Tina” Pewitt (1866-1941); (c) James H. Pewitt (1868-1928); (d) Lillian Amberzine Pewitt (1870-1930); (e) John S. Pewitt (b. 1873); (f) Silas Luther Pewitt (1875-1929); (g) Josaphine I. Pewitt (1879-1935); (h) Laborn (Laban) Pewitt–nothing else is known; (I) Martha Pewitt–nothing else is known.
  8. Laban Pewitt (1821-1869). Laban was born about 1821 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died in September 1869 in Dent County, Missouri. His first wife was Annis (Annas) Inman (1832-1855)–mentioned in the previous entry. They had one son: Wiley Pewitt, born 1849. Laban’s second wife was Sarah Jane Wolford (1832-1864).
  9. Wiley W. Pewitt (1822-1864). Wiley was born in 1822 in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died November 1864. He is buried in the Mount Hermon Vet Memorial Cemetery, Dent County, Missouri. His wife was Mary Elizabeth Birchlew (1826-1887). Their children were: (a) Laban Pewitt (1844-1862)–he died during the Civil War while serving in the Confederate Army; (b) Susannah “Susan” E. Pewitt (1847-1895); (c) Thomas J. Pewitt, born 1849; (d) Virginia A. Pewitt (1851-1924); (e) Lorenzo Dow Pewitt (1853-1891); (f) Amberzine Tennessee “Ammie” Pewitt (1855-1939); (g) James B. Pewitt (1857-1944); (h) Joel Price Pewitt (1862-1920); (I) William Wiley “Will” Pewitt (1864-1892).

The Missouri Inman Bushwhacker vs. The Tennessee Inman Scoundrel

 In  May 2002, Howard and I were returning to Colorado after a trip to the Midwest. We stopped in the town of Houston in Texas County, Missouri where I took front and rear pictures of a pioneer sign. I was still seeking the identity of a bushwhacker by the name of John Inman who was killed near Houston while trying to escape federal forces. Shortly after that, I discontinued my search–an interest that only rekindled during the writing of this article.  I began wondering whether anyone else had searched for  this John Inman and ran across an article I wrote in an old issue of Inman Innings. At that time, I was also looking for information on my husband’s Grogan line:

Just the other day, I received a query on-line. I am publishing it with the writer’s permission. I had put out an announcement on Tennessee Roots, North & South Carolina Roots, and Mid-Plains Roots on the Internet concerning my forthcoming Spence book. The writer saw my maiden name and sent this message, hoping that someone could provide an answer:

“When I first started researching, I thought Grogan was going to be my easiest family to trace but I found it more difficult than I thought. I have sent for a copy of my grandfather’s death certificate, and I am hoping it will have his mother’s first name on it. That will help with the Inman side and hopefully we will be able to make a connection.
 
I also heard from someone in Texas County, Missouri who told me where to write for information on the Grogans there. I hope I can find T. J. (Jeff) Grogan”s parents. I did find a Thomas Jefferson Grogan at the family History Center at the LDS Church, but I’m not sure it is the right one or if his name is Thomas Jefferson.
 
About Inman as a bushwhacker: it could be my great grandmother’s family. J. T. Jeff Grogan was married twice. His first marriage may have been to Cynthia Stephens 07 Mar 1872 in Clay County, Tennessee, but I haven’t confirmed that. He had two children from that first marriage–John Tom and Martha, I believe. His second marriage was to _______ Inman, and they had four children, including my grandfather, born in 1881, Charles Henry Grogan in Grogan, Cass Township, Texas County, Missouri. So he could have married the Inman there in Texas County. At least that makes the family history a little exciting.”
An earlier message from this correspondent reads:
 
“I don’t have any Spence families, but in reading your query, I noticed your maiden name and thought since you were a genealogist as well as an Inman, I might hit it lucky. Please forgive the length of this query.
 
My great-grandfather, Cleo Patrick ‘Tobe” Aaron (b. 1863 AL), married my great-grandmother, Margaret Wood Tomlinson in 1888 in Dunklin County, Missouri. The Aaron family were making their way to Texas and stopped in Dunklin county long enough “to make a crop” and–as it turned out–long enough for Tobe to meet and marry Margaret. The marriage didn’t last. Shortly after my grandmother was born (December 1889), the Aarons were divorced. Tobe moved on to northeastern Texas to rejoin his family. In October 1896 in Fannin County, Texas he married Lula Morris. He died there in 1959. Except for his name, I knew nothing about Cleo Patrick “Tobe” Aaron until I started searching two years ago. I found him in the Mormon Ancestral File. Three marriages were listed for him–the two I have mentioned AND a marriage to someone named D. INMAN. There is absolutely no other information. I located Tobe’s present-day family and asked them. Apparently Tobe had kept his marriages to my great-grandmother and to this D. Inman a secret for many years. And because his wife was so upset when she found out, his other marriages were never discussed.
 
Now his granddaughter is as curious as I am about who D. Inman is. My guess is that she was living either in Texas or in the Indian Territory, although it is also possible that she lived in Colorado (one of Tobe’s brothers had checked out the Mormon settlement in Manassa in the early 1890s). The marriage would have taken place between 1890 and 1896.”

I will explain the John Inman–bushwhacker question since it was an issue that I originally raised.

Last fall, I was doing a considerable amount of research concerning the border wars between Missouri and Kansas during the Civil War. I ran across an account (source misplaced at the moment) describing the execution of a “notorious” bushwhacker named John Inman by Union forces in Texas County, Missouri. As I recall, John Inman and another bushwhacker were first captured by the Union Army and were being held prisoner.  Inman and the other bushwhacker attempted to escape and were killed while running. Since discovering that information, I have been trying to discover the identity of John Inman and his possible connection to the Tennessee Inman families, from whom I descend. Texas County, Missouri is some distance from Jasper County, but location does not decide relationship as far as families are concerned.

A trip to the local library disclosed a John Inman living in Texas County on the 1850 Census. However, I don’t know whether this was the same John Inman–alleged bushwhacker. So I placed a query on the Internet, and the response was really surprising–not concerning John Inman, but another relative. I heard from a man who had done a considerable amount of research concerning Missouri bushwhackers who rode with Quantrill, Bloody Bill Anderson, and some of the others. He said that he would check his research and get back in touch with me. A few days later, he sent me a complete listing of all the known bushwhackers in Missouri, including the leader under whom they served. As I recall, his comment went something like this: “Couldn’t find your John Inman, but I’m sure you’ll find another name you mentioned (chuckle): ‘The other name: James Bunch–my ggg uncle who married Milly Catherine Spence, my ggg aunt, in Jasper County, Missouri.’ Allegedly, he rode with Quantrill!” (I knew that my James Bunch was head of a Confederate Home Guard Unit in Jasper County, and I remember my grandfather describing him as “a Confederate guerilla fighter,” but until I saw this list, I didn’t know how extensively he was involved. No doubt, that is the reason the Bunch family and my ggg grandmother, Elizabeth Inman Spence, fled Missouri after the Civil War and went down into Texas).

I am still in a quandary about John Inman, however. As I recall, the source suggested that many men were falsely accused of bushwhacking as an excuse for killing them simply because their sympathies remained with the South. This may have been true of John Inman.

Hopefully, someone will have the answer to this question(9).

The Inman Innings article was written in 1996. Since then I learned Quantrill’s  James Bunch lived in Northern Missouri and was not the James Bunch who headed the Confederate Home Guard Unit in Jasper County, Missouri.  And I believe I have identified John Inman the bushwhacker’s family. He did not come from the Dent County Inmans who intermarried with the Pewitts. He was part of the Texas County Inmans who descended from the South Carolina Inmans. Their Inman line was in Charleston at an early date. They moved up through the Carolina back country and settled in Tennessee.  My southern Inman line and their cousins in Dent County originally settled in Maryland and moved to North Carolina. From there, they moved to Williamson County, Tennessee. I do not believe the Dent County Inmans or the Houston County Inmans were directly related.

Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt and Daniel Spence settled in Jasper County, Missouri with Spence and Jones relatives. Some of Polly’s siblings intermarried with Elizabeth Inman Spence’s cousins and settled in Dent County, Missouri. The Dent County people supported the South during the Civil War. Daniel Spence and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt’s family supported the North. There does not appear to be any interaction between the two groups. As will be shown in the next article (Elisha Spence, Part 10), some of Daniel and Polly’s children fled to Kansas during the Civil War, and several of them stayed there.

A mystery resolved for the moment concerning the identity of a Missouri Inman bushwhacker! Now for the Tennessee Inman scoundrel!

Hezekiah W. Inman (a/k/a Hezekiah Haney) (1770-1847).

Hezekiah W. Inman was a brother of my fourth great grandfather, Samuel Inman (1772-1830)–therefore, my fifth great uncle, and an uncle of my third great grandmother, Elizabeth Inman Spence (1808-1872)–wife of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859). I didn’t mention his extra-curricular activities in The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family, but I am doing so here since they tie in indirectly with the Spences and the Pewitts.

Hezekiah had two families at the same time. His first wife was Christiana/Christina Spears (1774-1840), whom he married in 1793 in Halifax County, North Carolina and by whom he had five children. Approximately two years after the marriage, Hezekiah began an affair with Nancy “Blancy” Devine a/k/a Christiana/Christina Spears Haney Murphree (1780-1845), by whom he had five additional children. He moved to Williamson County, Tennessee with his first family and then traveled back and forth between Tennessee and North Carolina.  According to a note on my tree:

In 1805, Hezekiah left his family and moved to Anson, North Carolina, where he lived under the name Hezekiah Haney. He was living with Nancy Devine, who used the name Christina/Christiana Spears(10).

His legal wife Christiana divorced  him in 1814 after she discovered his double life. She also learned he was scheming to get his hands on a parcel of real estate her father had left her in his will. The court ruled in Christiana’s favor following testimony from one of Hezekiah’s cousins, Lazarus Inman, per the following:

1C. Inman   v.   H. Inman______________ Petition for a Divorce______________ Filed 6th October 1814

 2 To the Honorable the Judge of the Fourth Judicial Court the petition of Christina Inman who is and for several years has been a citizen of Tennessee by her next friend Lazarus Inman respectfully represents that about twenty years ago she intermarried with a certain Hezikiah Inman in the State of North Carolina, by whom she had five children, four of whom are still living. Your petitioner further shows that, about seven years ago the said Hezikiah Inman who is made defendant hereto, entirely abandoned your petitioner and her children, in Williamson County in this state and has ever since lived in open adultery with another woman named Nancy Divine by whom he has several children. Your petitioner has not since the Defendant abandoned her received any real assistance from him towards supporting herself and her children, but has been obliged to rely on her own labor for that purpose. Our petitioner represents, that her father has lately in about three months past departed this life leaving a small property to a part of which your petitioner is entitled. The defendant is endeavoring to get possession thereof and convert it to his own use. Your petitioner states that the defendant is in possession and owner of considerable property, a part of which ought to be allowed as alimony to her but he refused to make any such provision. Your petitioner therefore prays that she may be by order of this Court be divorced entirely from said defendant and may afford such
 

 3 alimony be allowed to your petitioner as to this Honorable Court may appear reasonable and just and in the mean time may the defendant be injoined from receiving or recovering any parts of her late deceased fathers estate and may also such other further relief be granted in the premises as is just.             /s/ Grundy Schulse (?)  State of Tenneessee to wit:This day personally appeared before me Thomas Stuart one of the Judges of the Circuit courts for the State of Tennessee Christina Inman the petitioner in the above petition and made oath that the facts stated in the above petition are true to the best of her knowledge and belief and that she does not pray this divorce out of ___ity nor is the application made by collusion between her and her said husband, for the mere purpose of being free and separated from each other, but is made by her in sincerity and truth for the causes stated in the above petitioner. Sworn to and subscribed before me this 4th day of October  

her/s/ Thos. Stuart                                                                                 Christina    X    Inman                                                                                                                            mark The Clerk of the Circuit court of Williamson County. Let a subpoena under seal of the court be issued to summon the above named Hezekiah Inman to appear at next Circuit court to be held in Williamson County, and answer the above petition. Also let a writ of Injunction be issued agreeably to the prayer of the above petition. Given under my hand to seal this 4th day of October 1814. Thos Stuart one of the Judged of the Circuit Court.{seal}

 3 (sic) C Inman                                                                                     }v.         }           subp                                                                                    }           to answerH. Inman___________ 9th October 1814 ___________ Came to hand10th October 1814 Not found /s/ Wm Hu___________(11).

Lazarus Inman (1765-1850) was a son of Meshach Inman (1749-1771) and the husband of Susannah Stovall (1765-1850). As already noted, some of their children and grandchildren intermarried with the Pewitts and resettled in Dent County, Missouri. No doubt the Inman descendants from Lazarus Inman knew about Hezekiah’s antics–a person they probably discussed from time to time. These stories would also pass down through the Spence and Pewitt lines until reaching the “Well-we-don’t-talk-about-that!” Stage!)

In 1824, Hezekiah married Eliza A. Branch (1803-1897) in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he had two additional children by her. His first wife wasn’t about to take him back, and his situation with Nancy Devine undoubtedly ended when he couldn’t get his way about Christiana’s property. He lived in Wayne County, Tennessee in 1830(12) and in 1836(13) and by 1840, he and his family relocated to Marshall, Mississippi(14).

Hezekiah died in Marshall County, Mississippi before September 1847.

(To Be Continued in  Elisha Spence: Part 10–The Children of Daniel Spence and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt)

 

 

References

(1) Tennessee State Marriages about Elisha Spence and Jane Bell. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) 1820 Census for Perry ,Tennessee about John Spencer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) 1820 Census for Lenoir County, North Carolina about Levi Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Tennessee State Marriages about Samuel Spence and Elizabeth Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Tennessee State Marriages about Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) “Leiper’s Fork” from the Wikipedia site. Article last updated 1 Oct 2014. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leiper%27s_Fork,_Tennessee

(7) Inscription on the Leiper’s Fork Historical Road Sign, Williamson County, Tennessee.

(8) Roadside Thoughts Website: Fernvale, Tennessee. Page Last Modified by John Hall: 9 Aug 2015. Date Accessed: 20 Aug 2015. Available online at http://roadsidethoughts.com/tn/fernvale-xx-williamson-cemeteries.htm

(9) Barbara Inman Beall, Editor. “A Grogan-Inman Problem”, Inman Innings, Vol. 2, No. 2. Spring 1996.

(10) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) Tennessee Divorce and Other Papers (1800-1965), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) 1830 Census for Wayne County, Tennessee about Hezekiah Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) Early Tennessee Tax Records about Hezekiah Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) 1840 Census for Marshall County, Mississippi about Hezekiah Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Aug 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

 

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Eight: The Family of John Bass Jones (1838-1867)

John Jones (1794-1843)--Photo taken at the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri, May 2001

John Jones (1794-1843)–Photo taken at the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri, May 2001

Permilia/Parmelia "Milly" Greer Jones (1795-1875). Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri.

Permilia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer Jones (1795-1875). Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri.

So–who was John Bass Jones?

A connecting link to many individuals portrayed in this series, John Bass Jones suddenly emerges on the scene and captures everyone’s attention. He stands at the crossroads of a number of connections. And because of his surname “Jones”, I feel as though I need to introduce him here and then place him aside until I arrive at the story of his murder two years after the Civil War. I think he would like that. He was a scoundrel, a rascal, a varmint, a “twerp” and a host of other names. So it is time to introduce him here in order to show how his family weaves in and out of the other family groups.

The youngest son of John Jones (1794-1843) and Parmelia/Permilia “Melly” Greer, John Bass Jones was born in Sarcoxie, Newton County, Missouri March 10, 1838, and he died in a hail of bullets April 16, 1867 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. He came from a good family. His parents were among the earliest settlers in Jasper County, and his father’s name is on the Moss Springs Pioneer Monument.

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

This Jones family history is sketchy. For years, people have recorded the wrong information about them. I bought into that information until I started digging into the records because I wasn’t satisfied with the information I had. There seemed to be no connection between John Bass Jones’ father and the people purported to be siblings. The information I present here is what I have to date. And the first problem centers around a tombstone inscription: John Jones’ tombstone–the father of John Bass Jones.

John Jones Tombstone.

John Jones Tombstone.

The Father of John Bass Jones: John Jones (1794-1843)

According to the inscription on John Jones’ tombstone, he died October 3, 1843 in Jasper County, Missouri at the age of “43 yrs 4 mo 14 d”(1). Based upon this inscription, people have placed his date of birth as May 30, 1800. However, a problem arises with this interpretation. According to a copy of the original marriage record, John Jones and “Milly” Greer were married September 30, 1813 in Davidson County, Tennessee(2). Melly would have been 16 to 18 years of age, but John would have been 13. In all likelihood, the tombstone carver made a mistake and the “43” should have been “49”, making John’s year of birth 1794 and not 1800! The rest of the problem with his date of birth centers around calculations. Four months from October places the birth month as June. 14 days from October 3 places the date of birth as the 20th. John’s date of birth was June 20, 1794. What follows was a huge surprise.

I always considered it strange that John Jones and his son John Bass Jones were buried in the same plot or area of the Moss Springs Cemetery with the Lewis Jones family. It is true that the two families intermarried, so I thought they were buried there for that reason. Then came a real shocker. They were buried there because they were family! John Jones (1794-1843) was a brother of Lewis Jones (1795-1849)–the husband of Milly Catherine Spence–and James B. Jones (1797-1870)–the husband of Charlotte T. Greer. John Jones was the oldest surviving son of Daniel Jones (1767-1815) and Sarah “Sallie” Basset (1769-1837). So there is no separate third line of Joneses! Furthermore, this John Jones was the John Jones appointed as administrator of David Spence’s estate in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1815(3) John Jones filed an inventory in David Spence’s Estate in November 1817 (4). As noted in an earlier section in the William Spence series, David Spence was a younger half-brother of Elisha Spence (1776-1835), and was the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Elisha Spence’s mother Judha Perry (1748-1795). David Spence died in camp while serving in the War of 1812!

The Daniel Jones family is set out in Part Seven of this series. However, since I just made my discovery about John Jones’ relationship with Daniel and Sallie, I’ll provide a brief outline here with the emphasis on John. The children of Daniel Jones and Sarah “Sallie” Basset were:

1. John Jones (1788-1794). No additional information. He was the first-born and he died young–the reason why I could find no additional information about him. Had he lived, he would have moved to Missouri with his brothers! He is not John Jones (1794-1843), who is buried in Moss Springs Cemetery!

2. Ollie Basset Jones (1789-1873). Her family is set out in Part Seven. She and her husband Samuel Smith settled in Fernvale, Williamson County, Tennessee.

3. John Jones (1794-1843)–the subject under discussion here. John was born June 20, 1794 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died October 3, 1843 in Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri. His tombstone is the oldest in the Moss Springs Cemetery, and he is buried in the Jones plot. On September 30, 1813, John married Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer (1795-1875) in Davidson County, Tennessee(5). (A full discussion of Melly Greer appears in the following section.) Their children are listed below. I have already talked about some of them in Part Seven, but I have some updates to note:

a. Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859). Daniel was born in Davidson County, Tennessee and he died in 1859 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas. Apparently, he was making plans to move his family there. I originally thought his middle name was associated with a specific family member. His middle name stood for Andrew Jackson. These people were Jacksonian Democrats. His first name would have been for his grandfather, Daniel Jones. Daniel married his first cousin, Rebecca Jones (1820-1867). Rebecca was the daughter of his uncle and aunt, Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. Their children are discussed in Part Seven, but I will relist them here: (i) James H. Jones (1844-1920)–his wife was Rosa “Rosie” McKelby (1850-1920); (ii) John Lewis Jones (1846-1929)–his wife was Henrietta Andrus (1856-1945); (iii) George Washington Jones (1848-1887)–his wife was Amanda Elizabeth Murphy (1853-1935); (iv) Daniel Greenberry Jones (1851-1924)–his wife was Mary Margaret “Martha” Hicks (1856-1900). [I now understand the origin of the name “Greenberry.” Melly Greer’s father’s name was Greenberry (Green Berry) Greer!]

b. James Greenberry Jones (1824-1884). James was born December 19, 1824 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died January 1, 1884 in Lincoln, Atchison, Missouri. His wife was Susan Jane Hammer (1825-1904), the daughter of Jacob Hammer (1793-1855) and Mary Polly Onstott (1793-1870)–another pioneer family of Jasper/Newton Counties. Their children were: (i) Sarah E. Jones (b. 1844); (ii) John David Jones (1847-1880); (iii) Joseph Greenberry Jones (1849-1933); (iv) George T. Jones (b. 1851); (v) Martha J. Jones (1854-1928); (vi) Mary Adaline Jones (1856-1934); (vii) Bluford Jacob Jones (1858-1917); (viii) Warren P. Jones (1860-1926); (ix) James Price Jones (1863-1933).

c. Joseph Lewis Jones (1827-1880). Joseph was born in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in Benton County, Arkansas. His first wife was Nancy Thompson Hazelwood (1829-1860). Their children were: (i) John Cass Jones (1849-1920); (ii) Greenberry “Green Berry” Jones (1852-1936); (iii) Mary M. Jones (b. 1854); (iv) Martha Jones (1856-1880); (v) William Craig Jones (1861-1935). His second wife was Elizabeth (maiden name unknown) (1845-1874). Their children were: (i) Amanda Jones, born 1865; (ii) Margaret Jones, born 1869; (iii) James R. Jones, born 1871; (iv) Wilson R. Jones, born 1872; (v) Sarah A. Jones, born 1874.

d. Nancy Frances Tennessee Jones (1828-1890). I talked about Nancy in Part Seven, but I did not talk about her first marriage. So I’ll do that here. Nancy was born November 23, 1828 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died November 18, 1890 in Village Creek, Johnson, Texas. Her first husband was Harrison Hammer (1822-1862)–a son of Jacob and Mary Onstott Hammer, and a brother of Susan Jane Hammer who married James Greenberry Jones. (While I am thinking about it, I should mention that the majority of the John Jones/Melly Greer family supported the South during the Civil War.) Harrison Hammer died about 1862 during Civil War Service. He served with the 5th Missouri Cavalry, Company E (Confederate)(6). After his death, Nancy lived on a farm near Sarcoxie with her mother and her children. The 1860 Census for Nancy T. Hammer lists the following people:

Nancy T. Hammer (age 32)
Jarvis J. Hammer (age 11)
John J. Hammer (age 7)
Corilla Hammer (age 4)
George B. Hammer (age 2)
Permelia J. Hammer (age 65)
Daniel J. Hammer (age 8)(7).

I’m not sure whether Daniel is Nancy’s son, or whether he is a member of another Hammer family. Permelia J. Hammer is Nancy’s mother, Melly Greer Jones. I have not found a marriage record for her with a Hammer. This may have been a census taker’s error in assuming that everyone in the household was a Hammer.

After her husband’s death, Nancy married her first cousin’s husband, Capt. William Newton Warren (1829-1883). Her first cousin was Sarah Zane Jones (1823-1862), a daughter of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. The story of her flight to Texas when the Union Army entered Missouri is told in Part Seven. Her mother, Melly Greer Jones, remained in Missouri. The children of Capt. William Newton Warren and Nancy Tennessee Jones follow: (i) Amelia Warren, born 1863; (ii) Gustavos Ericson Warren (1866-1947); and (iii) Effie Warren (1868-1936).

e. Margaret Martha Ann Jones (1834-1918). Margaret was born in January 1834 in Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri, and she died December 25, 1918 in Oneta, Wagner, Oklahoma. Her husband was George Washington Hammer (1829-1875)–another son of Jacob and Mary Onstott Hammer, and a brother of Harrison and Susan Jane. Their children were: (i) Permelia J. Hammer (1851-1880); (ii) James Emery Hammer (1853-1925); (iii) Francis Marion Hammer (1856-1901); (iv) Hezekiah Houston Hammer (1858-1913); (v) Sterling Richard Hammer (1861-1929); (vi) John B. Hammer (1863-1929); (vii) Mary T. Hammer (1866-1891); (viii) William Dudley Hammer (1868-1947); (ix) Joseph T. Hammer (1871-1885); and (x) Jesse Wade Hammer (1875-1969). An Elias Reece Porter (1850-1901) is listed with this family. I’m not sure who he is–whether he is an orphan who was being raised by the family, or whether he was a relative who was living with them.

f. John Bass Jones (1838-1867). John gets his own special section below.

Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer (1797-1875): The Mother of John Bass Jones

Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1797, and she died in Jasper County, Missouri November 30, 1875. Her parents were Greenberry (Green Berry) Greer (1764-1842) and Charlotte DeMoss (1767-1849). The children of Greenberry Greer and Charlotte DeMoss follow:

1. Nancy Greer (1785-1842). Nancy was born in Franklin County, Virginia in 1785, and she died after 1842 in Davidson County, Tennessee. Her first husband was John Lamb Goodwin (1775-1824), whom she married in Davidson County, Tennessee April 24, 1809(8). They had six children, whose names are unknown. Her second husband was Jacob Tennison (born 1789.) Nothing else is known.

2. Isaac D. Greer (1788-1860). Isaac was born in 1788 in Bedford County, Virginia, and he died in 1860 in Davidson County, Tennessee. Isaac also has two marriages. His first wife was Tabitha Goodwin (1789-1829), whom he married March 18, 1808 in Davidson County, Tennessee(9). They had two children: (a) Henry E. Greer (1811-1882). Henry was born in 1811 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1882 in District 8, Perry County, Tennessee. His first wife was Harriet P. Henry (1819-1859), whom he married in Davidson County December 6, 1834(10). Their children were (i) Thomas Greer, born 1836; (ii) Joseph A. Greer (1837-1909); (iii) Margaret Greer (1839-1884). His second wife was Cordelia Cain (b. 1840). Their children were: (i) Mary Izora Greer (1863-1896; (ii) Martha A. Greer (1865-1928); and Sarah C. Greer, born 1868. (b) Charlotte Greer (1816-1879). Charlotte was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1816, and she died March 22, 1879 in Humphreys County, Tennessee. On November 4, 1830, she married William McIllwain (1808-1870) in Davidson County, Tennessee)(11). Their children were: (i) Mary Elizabeth McIllwain (1834-1876); and (ii) Henry Martin McIllwain (1837-1913). Isaac’s second wife was Margaret “Peggy” Richardson (1791-1872), whom he married July 25, 1831 in Davidson County, Tennessee(12).

3. Susannah Louzania Luzany Greer (1793-1875). Luzany Greer was born November 8, 1793 in Bedford County, Virginia, and she died September 28, 1875 in Paris, Henry, Tennessee. On February 8, 1812, Luzany married William D. Dillahunty (1793-1838) in Davidson County, Tennessee(13). William was the son of Dillahunty, Jr. and Rachel Koonce (1758-1826), and a grandson of the Rev. John Dilahunty, Sr. (1728-1816) and Hannah Neal (1732-1816). The Rev. John was born in Havre de Grace, Maryland, and he died at Belle Meade, Davidson County, Tennessee. The Rev. John was instrumental in establishing the Baptist faith in Davidson County. The Dillahunty family left Maryland for North Carolina, where John Jr. was born in Dobbs County. And from there they went to Davidson County, Tennessee.

The children of Luzany Greer and John Dilahunty, Jr. follow: (a) James D. Dillahunty (1813-1893); (b) John G. Dillahunty (1815-1880); (c) Elizabeth “Betsey” Dillahunty (1816-1891); (d) William Louis Dillahunty (1818-1876) (e) Greenberry D. Dillahunty (1820-1891); (f) Charlotte Marinda Dillahunty (1821-1903); (g) Francis Marion “Locke” Dillahunty (1823-1910); (h) Joseph Henry Dillahunty (1826-1897); (i) Oliver Cromwell Dillahunty (1823-1852); (j) Helen Rachel Dilahunty (1830-1882); (k) Martha Luzany Dilahunty (1832-1858). Martha was born December 15, 1832 in Henry County, Tennessee, and she died September 9, 1858 in Mineral Wells, Palo Pinto, Texas. Her husband was John Dillard Love (1822-1889). They had one daughter named Mary Willy Zane Love (1852-1823);(l) Tabitha Dillahunty (1834-1835). Tabitha was born November 30, 1834 in Henry County, Tennessee.

4. Tabitha Greer (1794-1850). Tabitha was born in Davidson County Tennessee in 1794, and she died in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1850. Her husband was Houston Cooper (1790-1860). I know nothing more about them.

5. Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer (1795-1875)–John Bass Jones’ mother. Under discussion here.

6. Mahulda/Huldah Greer (1804-bef. 1860). Huldah was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1804, and she died before 1860 in Cheatham County, Tennessee. Her husband was Benjamin Franklin Hannah (1800-1860). Their children were: (a) Louisa Hannah (1824-1880); (b) Joseph Henry Hannah (1832-1904); (c) James Hannah (born 1832); (d) George Woodward or Woodard H. Hannah (1840-1900); (e) Benjamin Franklin Hannah, Jr (1843-1930).

7. James Lowe Greer (1806-1869). James was born in Davidson County, Tennessee November 25, 1806, and he died August 5, 1869 in Davidson County. His first wife was Hannah Dillahunty (1806-1849). Hannah was a daughter of Silas Dillahunty (1780-1829) and Sarah “Sallie” DeMoss (1783-1829). Sallie DeMoss was daughter of James DeMoss (1758-1813) and Luzany Taylor (1764-1786). James DeMoss was a brother of Charlotte DeMoss, James Lowe Greer’s mother. On the Dillahunty side, Silas Dillahunty was a son of John Dillahunty, Jr. and Rachel Koonce, and a brother of William D. Dillahunty, who married James Lowe Greer’s sister, Luzaney Greer! The children of James Lowe Greer and Hannah Dillahunty were: (a) Green Berry (Greenberry) Greer (1835-1855); (b) Joseph Silas Greer (1838-1921); (c) John Taylor Greer (b. 1843); (d) James Lowe Greer, Jr. (1848-1910). James Lowe Greer’s second wife was Louzanie P. “Zaney” DeMoss (1821-1900). Zaney was the daughter of Thomas Washington DeMoss (1789-1863) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Shelton (1799-1850). Thomas was the son of Abraham Louis DeMoss (1753-1820) and Hannah Greer (1755-1839). Hannah was the daughter of John G. Greer (1714-1782) and Nancy Ann “Nancy” Walker (1716-1804). The story takes an interesting turn here.

Hannah Greer (daughter of John and Nancy) had a brother named Joseph Greer (1767-1834). This Joseph Greer was born in Bedford County, Virginia in 1767, and he died in Franklin County, Virginia in 1834. His wife was Frances “Fanny” Lyon (1768-1830). Their children were: (a) John Greer (1796-1857); (b) Lucy Greer (1801-1838); (c) Charlotte T. Greer (1803-1877); (d) Peter B. Greer (1808-1875). My interest here is on Charlotte T. Greer. Charlotte was born in Tennessee in 1803 and she died February 22, 1877 in Newton County, Missouri. On September 8, 1821, Charlotte married James B. Jones (1797-1870)–a younger brother of Lewis Jones (1795-1849) and John Jones (1794-1843(14). Lewis was the husband of Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875)–the oldest daughter of Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Susannah Spencer (1785-1810). John was the older brother of Lewis and James B., whose wife was Melly Greer. So this is another connection between the two Jones families. James B. Jones and Charlotte T. Greer had two children: (a) Rachel Emeline Jones (1824-1861); and (b) George Jones (1831-1850). Now for another interesting twist to the story–this one centering upon Rachel Emiline Jones!

Rachel Emeline Jones was born February 20, 1824 in Tennessee and she died June 1, 1861 in Newton County, Missouri. About 1840, Rachel Emeline Jones married Madison Shelby Greer (1820-1908) in Newton County, Missouri. Madison Shelby Greer was born January 13, 1820 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died March 5, 1908 in Diamond, Newton County, Missouri. (My grandfather, William Franklin Spence (1884-1973), was born in Diamond!) Madison Shelby Greer was the son of Moses Greer (1795-1860) and Catherine Pollard (1795-1856), and grandson of a Moses C. Greer, Jr. (1768-1848) and Susannah Wood (1776-1848). Moses C. Greer was the son of Moses Greer, Sr., who was born June 2, 1744 at Gunpowder River, Baltimore, Maryland, and who died May 10, 1834 in Franklin County, Virginia and Mary Ann Fitch (1716-1786). And Moses, Sr was the son of John Greer, Sr. (1688-1752) and Sarah Day (1686-1746). Three children of interest are found in the John Greer, Sr.-Sarah Day generation which connect some of these links: William Greer, Sr. (1710-1785)–ancestor of Madison Shelby Greer–husband of Rachel Emeline Jones–daughter of James B. Jones and Charlotte T. Greer; John G. Greer, Jr. (1714-1782)–ancestor of Charlotte T. Greer–wife of James B. Jones and mother of Rachel Emeline Jones; and Joseph Greer (1727-1781)–the father of Greenberry (Green Berry) Greer (1764-1842) and grandfather of John Bass Jones (1838-1867)! [The point is, all the Greers and DeMosses and the Joneses portrayed in this narrative are related!]

Now–where was I?

8. Joseph H. Greer (1810-1835). Joseph was born December 23, 1810 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died August 22, 1835 in Davidson County. I have no information additional information about him.

There is a Green Berry Greer Cemetery in Davidson County, Tennessee where many members of the Greer family are buried(15). Likewise, the Dillahuntys had a Dillahunty Family Cemetery in Henry County, Tennessee(16). Those graves are all posted on Find-a-Grave.

John Jones and Permelia Greer are both buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri.

John Bass Jones (1838-1867). Grave at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

John Bass Jones (1838-1867). Grave at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Photo taken May 2002.

John Bass Jones (1838-1867)

According to my Ancestry calculator, John Bass Jones is a brother-in-law of my first cousin four times removed. That relationship may possibly change after Ancestry catches up with all the changes I have made today!

John Bass Jones was born March 10, 1838 in Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri, and he died April 16, 1867 in a hail of bullets in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri at his first cousin’s farm. That cousin was John David Jones (1827-1870), a son of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. People called him “Bass”. Presently, I have no idea how he obtained his middle name.

John Bass Jones and his sister, Martha, were the only two children born in Missouri. They were well aware of their family’s close association with the Spence family in Tennessee and in Missouri. John was only five years old when his father died. But his mother and other family members kept him informed of these stories. In addition to Milly Catherine Spence Jones, John knew Samuel and Daniel Spence, Milly Catherine’s brothers. He sometimes accompanied his cousin, John David Jones, to the Spence farms. On one such excursion, Samuel Spence (my third great grandfather), told him how his father, John Jones, was the administrator of Samuel’s uncle’s estate. John didn’t know what an administrator or an estate was, but he listened to the story.

“What was his name–your uncle?” John asked.

“Uncle Davey–David Spence. He died in the War of 1812. That’s where John Davey here gets his name?”

There was another attraction that secured young John’s interest at the Samuel Spence farm. His name was Newton Jasper Spence (1841-1882), a younger son of Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence. Three years younger than John, Newt Spence had more ideas for adventure than anyone John Bass Jones had ever known. And the two would become a plague in Jasper County in the early stages of the Civil War.

John Bass Jones became engrossed in secession talk that was sweeping the region. When he was younger, he and Newton Jasper fought invisible Yankees in the cornfields. As they grew older, the pair became associated with men with a dangerous eye for trouble. And Newton County (where John Bass lived) was definitely a “Little Dixie.” John Bass Jones grew up to despise the Union men living on Jones Creek. Keeping his opinions to himself was not part of his makeup. He did a great deal of spouting off and sometimes picked himself up off the ground as a result of it!

Only two census records bear his name. The 1850 Census record for Sarcoxie Twp., Jasper, Missouri shows twelve-year old John residing in his mother’s house. The census taker identified Permelia as Phoebe Jones and gave her year of birth as 1808 (she was born in 1795). The rest of the record is fairly correct(17). John also appears on the 1860 Census for Granby, Newton County, Missouri at the age of twenty-two in the Asa Scott household(18). His occupation is listed as a miner. Granby is important to this narrative. Some known bushwhackers resided in the area, and they definitely had an influence on John. He and Newton Jasper Spence formed their own little hoodlum group. They rode through the farms in Jasper County “whooping and hurrahing” and tearing up fencing along with other property structures. Bullets flew in all directions.

Newton Jasper Spence could hardly wait until he was twenty-one to join the Confederate Army. Several of John Bass Jones’ brothers-in-law also joined the Confederate Army. John Bass Jones went to Arkansas to let things cool down in Jasper County. His mother sent him down there. A number of her family members were in the Confederate Army. She decided the Army didn’t need John! And a number of her family members living in Arkansas would keep John out of trouble. So John went to Arkansas. It is unknown how much trouble he got into. But he met his future wife while there.

When I first began this research a few years ago, I discovered the wife of John Bass Jones was a Pipkin, but I focused on the wrong one. John’s wife was from the same Pipkin family, but she was a distant cousin of the woman I originally identified. John’s wife was a Baptist; the woman I originally focused on was a member of the LDS Church. And that was another reason why Permelia chose Saline County, Arkansas relatives for John. A Henderson family founded the Baptist Church there where her relatives were members. Some of their relatives were living in Missouri with his aunt Charlotte T. Greer Jones (James B. Jones’ wife). His uncle Jim had to go away on business in 1850, so the Hendersons moved into the household, where they appear on the 1850 Census(19). John Bass Jones didn’t mind the younger three children from Arkansas: Mary Ann Henderson (age 15); James Henderson (age 12); and William Henderson (age 10). Their parents were Abner B. Henderson, who was born in 1807 in Dearborn County, Indiana, and who died in 1840 in White River, Independence County, Arkansas, and Mary Adaline Hawkins, who was born in 1816 in New Jersey and who would die in Benton County, Arkansas after 1880. But he did mind the other Henderson living there–Otey Henderson–who was seventeen years old at the time and from a completely different Henderson line. His father was Joseph R. Henderson, Jr. (1802-1868) and Agnes Nancy Minnis (1804-1883). They were from Overton County, Tennessee. Otey’s uncle, Gideon B. Henderson (1808-1857), also lived in Newton County with his wife Jane and son, Abel(20).

“I know why he’s here!” John blasted, referring to Otey. “He’s friends with that Davey K. Hood family! A bunch of damn Yankees!”

“Don’t talk like that, John!”

“Why ain’t they loyal to the South!” John thundered to his mother

“Oh, John, you know southern people who are not loyal to the south!”

John Bass Jones and Otey Henderson engaged in a few dust-ups over the matter.

By 1860, Uncle James B. Jones was home and the Hendersons returned to their respective places. Otey was the first to go and returned to his family in Carroll County, Missouri, for which John was glad. By 1863, John learned Otey was Capt. William Moses “Otis/Otey” Henderson of the Union Army(21). John had plenty comments to make about that!

So, it is just as well, Permelia decided, not to tell John about the Hendersons who founded the Baptist Church he will be attending in Saline County, Arkansas!

John’s future wife was Mary Jane Pipkin. She was born November 3, 1836 in Arkansas, and she was the daughter of Willis Stephen Pipkin (1808-1848) and Mary Couch (1812-1890). The Pipkins came from North Carolina and settled in Saline County, Arkansas by 1838. John probably met Mary Jane in church; his mother’s relatives never missed a Sunday. By the time John met Mary, she was already a widow.

The children of Willis Stephen Pipkin and Mary Couch follow:

1. Ann Pipkin, who was born in 1829. Nothing else is known.

2. Martha Nancy Pipkin (1831-1908). Martha was born August 8, 1831 in St. Clair, Alabama and she died January 8, 1903 in Saline County, Arkansas. Her husband was James Monroe Kesterson (1828-1862). Their children were: (i) Sarah Jane Kesterson (1851-1908); (ii) Wilma Emaline Kesterson (1856-1882); (iii) Samuel L. Kesterson (1857-1927).

3. Sarah Pipkin (1833-1860). Sarah born 1833 in St. Clair, Alabama, and she died in 1860 in Saline County, Arkansas. Her husband was Jerome Bonaparte Kesterson (1829-1862). Their children were: (i) Mary Catherine Kesterson (1856-1924); (ii) Willis Vincent Kesterson (1858-1901); (iii) Martha Ann Kesterson (1860-1920).

Mary Jane Pipkin McFerrin/McFerren Find-a-Grave Photo.

Mary Jane Pipkin McFerrin/McFerren Find-a-Grave Photo.

4. Mary Jane Pipkin (1836-1870)–the subject here. Mary Jane was born in Arkansas November 3, 1836 in Arkansas, and she died November 4, 1870 in Saline County, Arkansas. On June 19, 1851 when she was fourteen years old, she married John McFerrin (1832-1863)(22). John was born 1832 in Alabama, and he died before August 1863 at Okolona, Chickasaw, Mississippi. He was serving in the Confederate Army. The following is from his military records:

John McFerrin, enlisted Feb 20, 1862, Betnon, Arkansas, Colonel Crawford, 2 years, has not been paid anything, absent from muster, Dropped from muster roll by order of Colonel Colquitt, sent to hospital 5 May 1862, has not been heard from, supposed to be dead(23).

Her husband was not killed in battle; he was sick and died from his illness. As far as I can confirm from the records, they did not have any children.

5. Adeline Pipkin (1838-1903). Adeline was born September 18, 1838 in Saline County, Arkansas, and she died June 24, 1903 in Saline County, Arkansas. Her husband was Daniel Allen Cameron (1833-1896). Their children were: (i) Willis James Cameron (1857-1825); (ii) Mary Elizabeth Cameron (1860-1945); (iii) Mary Elizabeth Cameron (1860-1945); (iv) Laura Josephine Cameron (1865-1869); (v) Louise Catherine “Katie” Cameron (1870-1936); (vi) Emma Sue Cameron (1871-1977); (vii) John Littleton Cameron (1874-1934); (viii) Samuel Burns Cameron (1877-1965)

6. Catherine Pipkin (1840-1883). Catherine was born in 1840 in Saline County, Arkansas, and she died October 1883 in Saline County, Arkansas. She had five marriages. The first was February 25, 1847 to John J. Johnson. The second was July 19, 1857 to Littleton H. Johnson (1830-1862). They had one child: William L. Johnson (b. 1860). The third was to John M. Jacobs (1816-1875). Their children were: (i) Joseph C. Jacobs (1865-1891); (ii) Mary Jacobs (1869-1920); (iii) Emma Jacobs (1871-1956). The fourth was to William J. Winston Wakefield (1814-1877). They had one child: Lillie Wakefield, born 1877. The fifth was to Robert P. Ware, born 1828. Their son was Horace Jewell Ware (1882-1859).

7. William Pipkin (1842-1862). William was born April 1842 in Saline County, Arkansas, and he died in the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee on April 6, 1862.

8. James Milton Pipkin (1846-1921). James was born April 30, 1846 in Saline County, Arkansas, and he died in Little Rock, Pulaski, Arkansas on February 12, 1921. His wife was Martha “Mattie” Tennessee Crawford (1849-1942). Their son was Dr. John Willis Pipkin (1869-1914).

9. A daughter (name unknown) who was born before 1848 in Arkansas, and who died before 1854.

When John Bass Jones met his future wife at church, she was still wearing her widow’s garment. He thought she looked so young, so he had to ask his mother’s relatives about her. They told him the story–and the story intrigued him all the more. Some time passed before he actually spoke with her, and it was probably at a church ice cream social. They were married either in late 1866 or very early in 1867. Then John made a fatal mistake. He decided to return to Missouri and settle near what was left of his family. Most of them had fled to Arkansas or to Texas. His mother still lived in Missouri; he and his wife could help her on her farm.

There is something about the return of a disliked individual to a region where that person once raised a lot of Cain. John’s return to Jasper and Newton Counties sent out an alarm that rippled throughout the area. He made the claim that he would round up a group of bushwhackers in Arkansas and wipe out all the Union men living on Jones Creek! He was staying with his cousin, John David Jones, on April 16, 1867 when he was killed. Masked men arrived at the farmhouse, ordered John out in the darkness, and shot him full of holes on the road. His wife was a widow once again. The story of an 1880 murder trial concerning his death will appear later.

John Bass Jones is buried in the Jones plot at the Moss Springs Cemetery in Jasper County. His wife returned to her family in Arkansas and never married again. She resumed using the McFerrin/McFerren name since she was married to her first husband much longer than she was to John Bass Jones. She appears on the 1870 Census Record for Saline County, Arkansas as follows:

Mary J Mcferren
[Mary J Pipkin McFerren]
Age in 1870:
33
Birth Year:
abt 1837
Birthplace:
Arkansas
Home in 1870:
Saline, Saline, Arkansas
Race:
White
Gender:
Female
Post Office:
Benton
Household Members:
Name/Age
Mary J Mcferren 33
Mary Kesterson 14
William V Kesterson 12
Dinah Etherly 16
Jane Etherly 5(23)

[Note: The Kestersons are probably a niece and nephew. Mary Jane had also taken in a young black woman (Dinath Etherly and her daughter (or another relative), five-year old Jane Etherly.]

Mary Jane died November 4, 1870, and she is buried with her family in the Pipkin Cemetery in Saline County, Arkansas. Her Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:

Birth: Nov. 3, 1836
Death: Nov. 4, 1870

Daughter of Willis and Mary Couch Pipkin.

Wife of John McFerrin, Married on June 19, 1851 in Saline County.

Note: Headstone spelled McFeren, marriage license is McFerrin. Her husband’s Civil War records list the spelling as McFerrin and McFerin.

Her husband,John McFerrin, enlisted in the Civil war on February 20, 1862 in Benton, Arkansas. He was sent to the hospital on May 5, 1862 in Okolona, Mississippi. His regiment, Colquitt’s Company E Arkansas Infantry, never heard from him again. He was removed from the muster rolls on August 1863, “Supposed to be dead”.

No children were listed in any records.

Family links:
Parents:
Willis Pipkin (1808 – 1848)
Mary Couch Pipkin (1813 – 1890)

Siblings:
Martha Nancy Pipkin Kesterson (1831 – 1903)*
Sarah Pipkin Kesterson (1833 – 1861)*
Mary Jane Pipkin McFeren (1836 – 1870)
Adeline Pipkin Cameron (1838 – 1903)*
William Pipkin (1842 – 1862)*
James M Pipkin (1846 – 1921)*

Note: Pipkin Family Plot, Pipkin Cemetery, Old Congo Road, Saline County, Arkansas. Willis Pipkin on left obscured by cedar tree, wife Mary Pipkin in unmarked grave in center, daughter Mary Jane McFeren on right. Both stones are broken.

Burial:
Pipkin Cemetery
Salem
Saline County
Arkansas, USA

Created by: LouJane Adams Wills
Record added: Apr 01, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 67764121(24)

References

(1) Inscription on John Jones Tombstone, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri
(2) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about John Jones and “Milly” Greer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 13 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) First Regiment (Pipkin’s) West Tennessee Militia, War of 1812 about David Spence. Tennessee State Library and Archives. Nashville, Tennessee
(4) First Regiment (Pipkin’s) West Tennessee Militia, War of 1812 about David Spence. Tennessee State Library and Archives. Nashville, Tennessee
(5) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about John Jones and “Milly” Greer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Civil War Service and Profiles about Harrison Hammer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) 1860 Census for Nancy T. Hammer, Fidelity, Jasper County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Nancy Greer and John Goodwin. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Isaac Greer and Tabitha Goodwin. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Henry Greer and Harriet Henry. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Charlotte Greer and William McIllwain. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12)Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Isaac Greer and Margaret “Peggy” Richardson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13)Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Luzany Greer and William Dillahunty. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14)Tennessee State Marriage, 1780-2002 about Charlotte T. Green and James B. Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15)Green Berry Greer Family Cemetery. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16)Dillahunty Family Cemetery. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17)1850 Census about “Phoebe” Jones, Newton County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18)1860 Census about Asa Scott, Granby, Newton, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19)1850 Census about Charlotte T. Jones, Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20)1850 Census about Gideon B. Jones, Newton County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21) U.S. Civil War Soldiers Profiles and Pension Papers about Capt. William Moses Henderson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22) Arkansas Marriage Records for Mary J. Pipkin and John McFerrin. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(23)John McFerrin Muster Papers, Civil War. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(24)1870 Census for Mary J. Pipkin McFerren, Saline County, Arkansas. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(25)Mary J. McFerren Find-a-Grave Memorial #6776412. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

To Be Continued in Part Nine: Daniel Spence (1806-1857) and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859)

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Seven: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and Lewis Jones (1795-1849)

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Milly Catherine Spence was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, and she died at Fidelity, Jasper County, Missouri November 30, 1875. On February 2, 1820, Milly Catherine Spence married Lewis Jones (1795-1849) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Lewis was a son of Daniel Jones (1767-1815) and Sarah “Sallie” Bassett (1769-1837). He was born December 25, 1795 in Franklin County, Virginia, and he died in 1849 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri. I have already detailed the connection of the Daniel Jones family line with the Pasquotank County, North Carolina Jones families in “Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part One: Setting the Stage”. So I won’t repeat it here. However, a third Jones family will connect with the marriage of Lewis and Milly Catherine’s oldest daughter.

The children of Daniel Jones and Sallie Bassett follow:

1. John Jones (1788-aft.1817). As noted in an earlier article, John was appointed administrator of David Spence’s estate in October 1815 in Davidson County, Tennessee(1). David Spence (1786-1814) was a half brother of Elisha Spence and the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Judah Perry (1748-1795). David Spence’s estate closed November 16, 1817(2). After that, John Jones disappears from the records. I do not know whether he ever married.

2. Ollie Bassett Jones (1789-1873). Ollie was born in 1797 in North Carolina, and she died July 10, 1873 in Fernvale, Williamson County, Tennessee. On November 28, 1809, Ollie married Samuel Smith (1786-1850) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) James L. Smith (1810-1868); (b) Sarah “Sallie” Smith (1812-1895); (c) Nancy Smith (b. 1816)–she may not have survived; (d) Daniel Jones Smith (1816-1868); (e)Samuel Smith (1823-1892); (f) Abraham “Abram” Smith (1826-1914); (g) Amelia “Millie” Ann Smith (1828-1902); (h) James Smith (1829-1850); (i)Ollie Emaline Smith (1832-1917); (j) George Smith (b. 1836); (k) Willie Smith–no additional information. A portion of a road sign commemorating Fernvale reads as follows:

“In 1819, Samuel and Ollie Jones Smith settled along the South Harpeth River near the sulphur springs… Other historic families include Allen, Beasely, Givens, Harrison, Hughes, Inman, Ivy, Jones, King, Kirby, Page, Pewitt, Sullivan and White.”

3. Lewis Jones (1795-1849). Under discussion here.

4. James B. Jones (1797-1870). James was born November 21, 1797 in Tennessee, and he died January 20, 1870 in Newton County, Missouri. On September 8, 1821, he married Charlotte T. Greer (1803-1877) in Davidson County, Tennessee. This marriage is another connection to the third Jones family. Their children were: (a) Rachel Emeline Jones (1824-1861); (b) George Jones (b. 1831); (c) Mary Ann Jones (b. 1835); James Jones (b. 1838); and William Jones (1840-1882).

5. Nancy Jones (1801-1879). Nancy was born January 20, 1801 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died June 1879 in Davidson County, Tennessee. On March 4, 1820, she married Christopher Butts (1788-1870) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) Lyda Butts, b.1817–Christopher may have had an earlier marriage; (b) James M. Butts (1828-1870); (c) Ollie E. Butts (1828-1899); (d) Parmelia Butts, b. 1831; (e) Daniel Butts, b. 1834; (f) Elizabeth Butts (1838-1913); (g) Christopher M. Butts, b. 1841.

6. Elizabeth Jones, b. 1808 in Tennessee. She may have died young.

***

The Family of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Jones

Lewis Jones appears on the 1820 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, dated January 4, 1820(1). A woman his mother’s age appears in the household along with some younger brothers and sisters. He lives in the same neighborhood as John David Spencer where Samuel and Daniel Spence lived. Lewis and Milly were married in Davidson County, Tennessee on February 2, 1820(2). A woman Milly Catherine’s age appears in the Elisha Spence household in 1820(3). The enumeration date is August 7, 1820. That would have been after her marriage. She may have returned home to help her step-mother with the children for a while, especially if Lewis was away or if there was an illness in the family. By 1830, the Lewis Jones family had returned to Davidson County(4).

The children of Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones were:

1. Rebecca Jones (1820-1867). Rebecca was born in 1820 in Tennessee, and she died in 1867, probably in Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri. I haven’t found the exact location of her death as yet. She married Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859) on January 17, 1839 in Barry County, Missouri(5). This is marriage united two Jones families, thus connecting a third Jones family into this lineage. I will discuss that family in a separate section. Their children follow:

a. James H. Jones (1844-1920). James was born in January 1844 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died after 1920 in Philipsburg, Granite, Montana. His wife was Rosa “Rosie” McKelby (1850-1920), whom he married in Jasper County, Missouri January 14, 1880. They had one daughter: Sarah Alice Jones, born 1896.

b. John Lewis Jones (1846-1929). John was born February 12, 1846 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri, and he died October 7, 1929 in Missoula, Montana. He married Henrietta Andrus (1846-1945) in 1874 in Washinton, Utah. They had a number of children: (a) Louis Henry Jones (1876-1880); (b) Lillie May Jones (1877-1900); (c) George Wilford Jones (1878-1955); (d) James Andrew Jones (1880-1909); (e) Emma Jones (1886-1900); (f) Anna “Annie” Rebecca Jones (1886-1965); (g) Myrtle Jones (1888-1900); (h) Nellie Irma “Oma” Jones (1889-1978); (i) Grover Cleveland Jones (1891-1963); (j) Randolph Jones (1892-1900); (k) Thomas Lewis Jones (1899-1908); (l) Irma Jones–no information.

c. George Washington Jones (1848-1887). George was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1848, and he died after 1887 in Jasper County, Missouri. His wife was Armanda Elizabeth Murphy (1853-1935), whom he married March 20, 1887 in Carterville, Jasper, Missouri.

d. Daniel Greenbury Jones (1851-1924). Daniel was born August 17, 1851 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died October 4, 1924 in Covina, Los Angeles County, California. His wife’s name appears on the records both as Mary Margaret Hicks (1856-1900) and as Martha M. Hicks. They were married March 27, 1873 in Jasper County, Missouri. There children were: (i) Arthur Alvin Jones (1874-1966); (ii) Oliver Wendell Jones (1875-1961); (iii) Elsie Pearl Jones (1877-1880); (iv) Newell Elton Jones (1879-1914); (v) Tillie Lois Jones (1880-1961); (vi) William Jack Jones (1885-1919); (vii) James W. Jones (b. 1888); (viii) Beulah Hester Jones (1893-2000); (ix) Olive Marie Jones (1896-1924).

Some people have suggested a Lorella Jones as a member of this family. She appears to have been born in Illinois, so she would not have been a member of this family. Her date of birth was 1851, so she would have been a twin of Daniel Greenbury Jones. He was born in Jasper County, Missouri.

***

2. Sarah Zane Jones (1823-1862). Sarah was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1823, and she died April 5, 1862 in Jasper County, Missouri. She married William Newton Warren (1820-1883) at Jones Creek, Jasper County, Missouri. He would become Captain William Newton Warren, C.S.A. during the Civil War. Their children were:

a. Lewis E. Warren (1842-1902). Lewis was born December 2, 1842 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died February 28, 1902 in Texas. He is buried with family members in the Prairie Springs Cemetery, Cross Timber, Johnson County, Texas. He appears to have never married.

b. Daniel Columbus Warren (1844-1926). Daniel was born March 28, 1844 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died June 22, 1926 in Joshua, Johnson County, Texas. In Summer 1862, Daniel enlisted in the Missouri Troop Infantry, Company A, 11th Regiment, Parson’s Brigade, Confederate Army in Neosho, Newton County, Missouri, and he served until the end of the war(6). He married Mary Etter (b. 1857) in Johnson County, Texas on July 3, 1876. She had a son named Neil, and it appears that Daniel adopted him.

c. Thomas Benton Warren (1846-1922). (Thomas Benton Warren has been confused with a John Thomas Warren (1844-1922) with the Benton name inserted. This is the correct Thomas!) Thomas was born February 25, 1846 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died December 25, 1922 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. He did not fight in the Civil War. His wife was Rosanna Catherine Josephine Gant (1855-1911), whom he married in 1873, probably in Texas. Their children were: (i) James Edward Warren (1875-1956); (ii) Ninetta Warren (b. 1877); (iii) Pettie Warren (b. 1878); (iv) William Newton Warren (1880-1962); (v) Perna/Capurnia Z. Warren (1883-1961); (vi) Bessie Warren (b. 1885); (vii) Millie Olya Warren (1888-1975).

d. Elizabeth J. Warren (1848-1913). Elizabeth was born August 12, 1848 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and she died August 24, 1913 in Johnson County, Texas. She married George Washington Bransom in 1870 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas. Their children were: (i) Benjamin W. Bransom (1871-1894); (ii) Mary T. Bransom (1873-1892); (iii) James Allen Bransom (1876-1963); (iv) Samuel H. Bransom (1878-1891); (v) Mittie M. Bransom (1879-1912); (vi) Ida Daisy Bransom (1879-1964); (vii) Charles Otis Bransom (1882-1883); (viii) Effie I. Bransom (b. 1884); (ix) Robert Gus Bransom (1886-1976); (x) George Edward Bransom (1886-1976); (xi) WK Bransom–no information.

e. Melinda Ann “Millie” Warren (1850-1938). Millie was born October 23, 1850 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died February 14, 1938 in Joshua, Johnson County, Texas. On September 10, 1868, she married Asbury Franklin Eddleman (1843-1932) in Johnson County, Texas. He was a private Company C, 10th Texas Regiment, C.S.A.(7). Their children were: (i) William D. Eddleman (1869-1869); (ii) James Franklin Eddleman (1871-1957); (iii) Thomas Wesley Eddleman (1872-1947); (iv) Columbus Edward Eddleman (1875-1963); (v) Grace Edith Eddleman (1878-1921); (vi) Ettie Zane Eddleman (1883-1966); (vii) Reginald Newton Eddleman (1885-1980); (viii) Earl Homer Eddleman (1891-1974).

f. Ketirah or Keturah Warren (b. 1853, Jasper County, Missouri.) Nothing else is known.

g. Robert Newton Warren (1855-1929). Robert was born March 15, 1855 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died January 29, 1929 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. His wife was Adelia Pearce (1873-1964), whom he married June 29, 1898. They had one daughter: Mable Warren (1899-1989).

h. Mary Ann Warren (1857-1938). Mary Ann was born January 24, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died September 30, 1938 in Mineral Well, Palo Pinto, Texas. She married Matthew Russell Birdwell (1854-1932) in 1875 or early 1876. They had two children: (i) John William Birdwell (1876-1953); and Bessie Ethel Birdwell (1877-1953).

i. Henry C. Warren (b. 1859, Jasper County, Missouri). He may have died young. I could find nothing more.

j. Sarah L. Warren. I have no more information other than her name(8).

Sarah Zane Jones Warren died in Jasper County, Missouri in 1862 and was probably buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery. Shortly after her death, her husband married Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890) in Jasper County, Missouri. Nancy’s brother was Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859), the husband of Sarah Jane’s older sister, Rebecca. The third Jones family will be discussed in the next article.

Some people place a Lewis M. Warren (1841-1875) in this family as the oldest son. He was born in 1841 in Missouri, and he died in 1875 in Christian County, Missouri. If this were true, the Warrens would have had two sons named Lewis in the first and second position. After researching the matter, I believe I have discovered the identity of Lewis M. Warren. His surname was originally Park. His widowed mother, Nancy Warren, appears on the 1850 Census for Franklin County, Missouri with the following children: Robert Warren (b. 1835); Jane Warren (b. 1837); Ephraim Warren (b. 1839); Lewis Warren (1842-1875); Martha Warren (b. 1846)(9). Further inspection of the records shows that on September 16, 1847, Nelson Warren married Mrs. Nancy Park in Franklin County, Missouri(10). Nelson Warren may have died before the 1850 Census. I don’t know what happened to Nancy Park Warren. She may have remarried, or she may have died after the 1850 Census. Lewis M. Warren served in the Union Army for three years during the Civil War–another factor disconnecting him from the William Newton Warren family(11),(12). The William Newton Warren family–solidly Confederate–relocated to Texas in 1865 after the Union Army entered Missouri. This story is found in Mary Ann Warren’s Obituary:

Mrs. Mary Birdwell, 81, who as a child fled with her mother to Texas on an ox-drawn wagon when invading Yankee troops drove families of Confederate soldiers out of her native Missouri in 1865, died here early early Friday night, following an extended illness.

The wife of the late Matthew R. Birdwell, former cattleman who halped drive marauding Indians from this section, Mrs. Birdwell lived here more than fifty years.

She was the daughter of the late William N. Warren, a former State Representative in Missouri, who served in the Confederate Army as a Captain. Twenty-seven wagons crowded with wives and children of Confederate soldiers, were in the train in which she rode to Texas. Her family stopped in Grayson County, where they remained until the war ended and Captain Warren could join them and in the spring of 1866 they moved to Johnson County where her father settled on a tract of land near Burleson…(13).

Lewis M. Warren did not go to Texas. On February 13, 1866, he married Sarah Jane Adams (1836-1916) in Lincoln County, Kentucky(14). By 1870, he and his family settled in Clay, Greene County, Missouri(15). Lewis died in Christian County, Missouri May 4, 1875(16). His children were: James Charles Warren (1866-1943); Rebecca Frances Warren (1869-1951); Sarah Jane “Sadie” Warren (1871-1957); Mary “Mollie” Warren (1873-1944); Lewis Thomas Warren (1876-1951). He was not a child of William Newton Warren and Sarah Zane Jones.

William Newton Warren and Tennessee Jones had the following children:

a. Amelia Warren, who was born about 1863 in Jasper County, Missouri. Nothing else is known.
b. Gustavos Ericson Warren (1866-1947). Gustavos was born April 13, 1866 in Johnson County, Texas, and he died July 21, 1947 in Sinton, San Patricio, Texas. His wife was Dove Maltsberger (1874-1957), whom he married in Texas in 1899. Their children were: (i) Margaret Warren, born 1902; (ii) Gus E. Warren, Born 1903; (iii) Eric Warren, born 1904; and (iv) George William Warren (1905-1997).
c. Effie Warren (1868-1936). Effie was born October 25, 1868 in Burleson, Johnson County, Texas, and she died June 8, 1936 in Abernethy, Hale County, Texas. Her husband was Richard Marion Hardesty (1870-1944), whom she married in 1894 in Texas. Their children were: (i) Aubrey Newton Hardesty (1896-1968); (ii) Thomas Edwin Hardesty (b. 1897); (iii) Anna May Hardesty (1899-1971); (iv) James Marion Hardesty (b. 1901); (v) Wesley Warren Hardesty (1905-1982); (vi) Rudd E. Hardesty (1907-1975).

***

John David Jones (1827-1870)--Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

John David Jones (1827-1870)–Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

3. John David Jones (1827-1870). John David Jones was born in Tennessee in 1827, and he died September 28, 1870 in Jasper County, Missouri. He will reappear in later a later article concerning the murder of John Bass Jones (1838-1867). John Bass Jones was a brother of Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859) and Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890)–the third Jones family. John David Jones’ wife was Elizabeth Foster (1840-1902). She will also reappear in the John Bass Jones murder article. John David Jones and Elizabeth Foster were married December 20, 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children were:

a. Thomas Allen Jones (1861-1942). Thomas was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1861, and he died October 12, 1942 in Southwest City, McDonald County, Missouri. He married Mary Sabrit Thornhill (1874-1944) in Benton County, Arkansas. Their children were: (i) Oliga Jones, born 1891; (ii) Victor H. Jones, born 1897); (iii) Clarence Lloyd Jones, born 1906; (iv) Lucy Helen Jones (1910-1972); (v) Daisy Belle Jones (born 1912).

b. Hettie D. Jones, born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1864. She disappears after the 1880 Census, where she appears in her mother’s household(17). I have no additional information.

c. William H. Jones (1866-1939). William was born in Jasper County, Missouri in July 1866, and he died in 1939 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. He married Alberta V. (Birdie) Kessler (1868-1961) in 1889. She was the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Kessler (1832-1919) and Amanda Grace Wing (1844-1915)–my second great grandparents–and a sister of Josephine Virginia Kessler (1865-1925), wife of Salathiel Monroe Spence (1854-1921)–my great grandparents. Alberta was my second great aunt. According to the Ancestry calculator, William H. Jones is my second cousin three times removed. Their children were (i) W. Glenn Jones, born March 1890 in Arkansas; (ii) Neal C. Jones, who was born September 1898 in Missouri; and (iii) Walter Leroy Jones (1906-1964).

d. John D. (Charles) Jones (1871-1924). John was born after his father’s death on January 2, 1871 in Fidelity, Jasper, Missouri, and he died June 27, 1924 in Pineville, McDonald County, Missouri. On March 23, 1893, he married Hattie Rebinah Crocker (1873-1957) in Neosho, Newton, Missouri. They had a son: Raymond Gerald Jones (1895-1967).

***

4. Luvina McClellan Jones (1830-1878) Luvina was born March 28, 1830 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee, and she died February 9, 1878 in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho. On March 17, 1850, she married Amos Buchanan (1826-1907) in Jasper County, Missouri. He was a farmer and a minister or an evangelist. The family traveled frequently. By 1859, the Buchanans relocated to Missouri City, Texas. They were in Drakesville, Iowa in 1863. They returned to Missouri for a while and then relocated to Idaho. Their children follow:

a. Rebecca Jane Buchanan (1851-1932). Rebecca was born March 23, 1851 in Neosho, Newton, Missouri, and she died January 1932 in Glendale, Douglas, Oregon. Her husband was Daniel Peter Greninger (1847-1925). Their children were: (i) Minnie Greninger, b. 1871; (ii) Mary Lu Greninger (1875-1946); (iii) Ira L. Greninger (1878-1960; (iv) Audrey A. Greninger (1880-1957); (v) Cora Greninger (1882-1956); (vi) Winifred Freginger (1885-1970); (vii) Bonita Greninger (1892-1892); (viii) Juanity Margerite Greninger (1892-1979).

b. Maryetta Lorella Buchanan (1852-1871). Maryetta was born November 10, 1852 in Missouri, and she died September 10, 1871 in Missouri. I have no additional information.

c. Millie Ann Buchanan (1855-1920). Millie was born March 3, 1855 in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, and she died May 13, 1920 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. She may or may not have married a Ben Wilson. I have no information about him. On May 12, 1878, she married Hiram Buckley Cole (1836-1918) in Moscow, Latah, Idaho. Their children were: (i) Sarah Lorene Cole (b. 1881); (ii) Alta Rebecca Cole (1882-1922); (iii) Hyrum Louis Cole (1884-1947); (iv) Ollie Annice Cole (1887-1962); (v) June Cole (b. 1888); (vi) Constance Mable Cole (1891-1951); (vii) Tressie Abigail Cole (1893-1981); (viii) Millard Donald Cole (1895-1963); (ix) Mildred Dorothy Cole (1895-1972).

d. Levi Perry Buchanan (1856-1857). Levi was born August 23, 1956 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died the following year on September 25, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri.

e. Mark Lemuel Buchanan (1858-1932). Mark was born March 12, 1858 in Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died July 13, 1932 in Sedro-Woolley, Skagkit, Washington. On November 20, 1881, he married Sarah Emma Ellis (1864-1934) in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho. Their children were: (i) Myrtle Levina Buchanan (b. 1884); (ii) Oscar Henry Buchanan (b. 1887); (iii) Ollie Viola Buchanan (b. 1894); (iv) Ina Margaret Buchanan (b. 1897); (v) Henry Ellis Buchanan (1899-1938); (vi) Lorna May Buchanan (b. 1901).

f. Ira Samuel Buchanan (1859-1925). Ira was born November 5, 1859 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas, and he died March 31, 1925 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. He married Lurana Holden (b. 1869) in 1883. Their children were: (i) William A. Buchanan, born 1884; (ii) Ira R. Buchanan, born 1886; (iii) Charles F. Buchanan, born 1890; (iv) Ashley Buchanan, born 1892; (v) Lawrence Buchanan, born 1894; (vi) Oscar Buchanan, born 1895; (vii) Lillie L. Buchanan, born 1897; (viii) Elmer C. Buchanan, born 1901.

g. Amos Newton Buchanan (1861-1863). Amos was born in 1861, and he died in 1863. I don’t have any additional details.

h. John Andrew Buchanan (1863-1936). John was born October 2, 1863 in Drakesville, Davis County, Iowa, and he died December 22, 1935 in Astoria, Clatsop, Oregon. He married his first wife Nellie Wells August 11, 1889 in Yamhill, Yamhill, Oregon. They had one child: Bonnie B. Buchanan, born about 1891 in Oregon. He married his second wife Madge Belle Bond (1863-1951) on January 16, 1901 in Roseburg, Douglas County, Oregon. Their children were: (i) Mary Maurine Buchanan, born in 1903; and (ii) Louise L. Buchanan, born in 1906.

i. Amos J. Buchanan (1866-1942). Amos was born February 12, 1865 in Missouri, and he died March 3, 1942 in Los Angeles. His wife was Lilly B. Cloyd, who was born in 1876 in Los Angeles. Amos and his wife appear in her mother’s household on the 1920 Census for Julia Mariah Bottom Cloyd(18). A Dale Miller, born about 1914, lives with them. He is listed as Julia’s grandson. I believe he may have been the son of one of Lilly’s sisters–but I haven’t found a Miller married to any of them as yet. He could have been Lilly’s son by a previous marriage, but I haven’t found evidence of that either. He may be the Dale Miller, born about 1914, who died in Los Angelis California June 24, 1921(19). Dale Miller does not appear on subsequent census records for Amos and Lilly Buchanan.

j. Luvina Buchanan (1866-1866). Luvina was born February 13, 1866, and she died November 10, 1866.

k. Dora Belle Buchanan (1868-1955). Dora Belle was born August 1, 1868 in Missouri and she died July 23, 1955. Her husband was George H. Lynch (b. 1856), whom she married in 1894. They had two children: (i) Verna G. Lynch, who was born in 1896, and (ii) Verda Zell Lynch (1898-1990)

l. Cora Buchanan (1870-1968). Cora was born September 3, 1870 in Missouri, and she died May 5, 1968 in Toppenish, Washington. She married William Arthur Jones (1860-1945) on May 10, 1897 in Spokane, Washington. He was born in Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois and his parents were Joseph Henry Jones (1831-1891) and Mary Jane Morgan (1834-1921). This Jones line came from Canada. The children of Cora Alice Buchanan and William Arthur Jones were: (i) Joseph Arthur Jones (1898-1980); (ii) Harold Arthur Jones (1898-1980); (iii) Millicent B. Jones (b. 1903); Miriam Livina Jones (1905-1998); (iv) Clay Buchanan Jones (1909-1993).

m. Margaret “Maggie” May Buchanan (1874-1890). Maggie was born August 17, 1874 in Missouri and she died at the age of sixteen on October 7, 1890 in Yanhill, Oregon.

Luvina McClellan Jones died February 9, 1878 in Moscow, Nez Perz, Idaho. Amos Buchanan married Chlore Isabelle Cole (1853-1933) on June 30, 1878 in Nez Perce, Idaho. They had three children.

a. Pearlie Minerva Buchanan (1880-1963). Pearlie was born October 13, 1880 Near Moscow, Latah, Idaho, and she died July 10, 1963 in Independence, Jackson, Missouri. She married Henry Austin Moriarity (1875-1942). Their children were: Lete B. Moriarity (b. 1905) and Henry Austin Moriarity, Jr. (b. 1908).

b. Fredrick Garfield Buchanan (1882-1953). Fredrick was born March 30, 1882 in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho, and he died August 18, 1953 in Columbus, Cherokee, Kansas. His wife was Mary Elsie Nichols (1887-1971). Their children were: (i) Gladys Irene Buchanan (1908-1971); (ii) Della May Buchanan (1909-1971); (iii) Rosa Unis Buchanan (1910-1912); (iv) Julia Onis Buchanan (1912-1975); (v) Ruby Inez Buchanan (1914-1965); (vi) Leonard (Onis) Green Buchanan (1915-1915); (vii) Juanita Louise Buchanan (1916-1971); (viii) Lewis Edward Buchanan (1918-1918); (ix) Cora Alberta Buchanan (1920-1971); (x) Twyla Marie Buchanan (1923-2001); (xi) Cleta Jane Buchanan (1925-1971).

c. Martha Fairchild Buchanan (1887-1932). Martha was born February 2, 1887 in Idaho, and she died June 17, 1932. She appears to have never married. I have no additional information about her.

Amos Buchanan and his wife Chloe Isabelle Cole divorced about 1889. He left for Oregon shortly after the divorce, which was probably the reason for the discord. He wanted to go to Oregon and Chloe didn’t! The children of his first marriage went to Oregon with him, and Chloe’s children remained with her. She relocated to Crestline, Cherokee, Kansas, where she married Henry Wiggins (1841-1910) on November 15, 1892. Their children follow: (i) Ledori Tecoma Wiggins (1892-1895); (ii) Loretti Seattle Wiggins (1893-1981); (iii) Columbia Cole Wiggins (1894-1929); (iv) Unknown Child Wiggins (1888-1889).

Amos Buchanan also remarried in 1889. His third wife was Amanda Frazier (1853-1904). Amanda was born in Missouri, and she died in Oregon. Amanda died in 1904; Amos died May 2, 1907. They are buried together in Roseburg Memorial Gardens, Roseburg, Douglas, Oregon.

***

5. Nancy Jane Jones (1832-1929) Nancy Jane Jones’ records have been confused with Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890). When I first started working on the Jones line, I thought they were one and the same. That isn’t the case. Nancy Tennessee Jones (1818-1890) (already discussed earlier in this article) was a sister of Daniel Jackson Jones and of John Bass Jones (the third Jones line). Nancy Jane Jones was a daughter of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence, and she is under discussion here. She was born February 19, 1832 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died March 19, 1929 in Claude, Armstrong, Texas. Her nickname was “Maxie”, so she appears on some records as Nancy Jane “Maxie” Jones/Hood.

Nancy had two husbands. They were brothers and sons of Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)–my third great grandparents. Their daughter and sister of the two brothers–Manerva Caroline Hood (1824-1901)–my second great grandmother–married my second great grandfather–William David Spence (1827-1907. William David was the second oldest son of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859)> and Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872). (This whole thing keeps traveling around in a circle!).

On November 20, 1853, Nancy Jane Jones married Norris Franklin Hood (1832-1863) in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children follows:

a. Laura “Laurie” Elmira Hood (1854-1927). Laurie was born October 25, 1854 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died September 8, 1927 in Lockney, Floyd County, Texas. She married Thomas Jefferson Thornton (1847-1929) on January 14, 1874 in Johnson County, Texas. Their children were: (i) William Newton Thornton (1874-1971); (ii) Exander Dudley Thornton (1876-1961); (iii) Walter Thornton (1878-1884); (iv) Charles Fredrick Thornton (1880-1956); (v) Margaret “Maggie” May Thornton (1882-1966); (vi) Minnie Gertrude Thornton (1884-1962); (vii) Lida M. Thornton (b. 1886); (viii) Edwin W. Thornton (1888-1971); (ix) James Claude Thornton (1890-1958); (x) Burton Norris “Pete” Thornton (1894-1970); (xi) Bertie Jane Thornton (1894-1989).

b. Alice Almina Hood (1856-1932). Alice was born August 26, 1856 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died April 1, 1932 in Alamogordo, Otero, New Mexico. On April 24, 1881, she married Joseph Lucas Hudman (1853-1909) in Palo Pinto County, Texas. Their children were: (i) Bessie Lee Hudman (1883-1955); (ii) Willie Norris Hudman (1884-1919); (iii) Donnie Nora Hudman (1885-1980); (iv) Etta Cordelia Hudman (1888-1891); (v) Charles T. Hudman (1889-1947); (vi) Maud V. Hudman (1891-1958); (vii) Olen Warren Hudman (1898-1918); (viii) Glenn Fields Hudman (1898-1966).

c. Charles A. “Charlie” Hood (1859-1861). Charles was born in 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died in 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri.

d. Eva Lourella Hood (1861-1944). Eva was born January 1, 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died October 8, 1944 in Vernon, Texas. In August 1881, she married Richard Berry Richardson (1857-1937) in Palo Pinto County, Texas. Their children were: (i) Neppie Mae Richardson (1882-1918); (ii) Maude E. Richardson (1884-1974); (iii) Essie Ollie Richardson (1886-1888); (iv) Willie Glenn Richardson (1888-1963); (v) Richard Norris Richardson (1894-1960); (vi) Nancy J. Richardson (b. 1897); (vii) Eva Louise Richardson (1910-1990).

e. Norris F. “Bud” Hood (1863-1930). Bud Hood was born in Jasper County, Missouri on April 16, 1863, and he died October 24, 1930 in Claude, Armstrong, Texas. According to his death certificate, he was hit by a freight train. There is a question as to whether he ever married. The consensus is that he did not. However, a 1910 Census record for a Norris Hood suggests the following:


Name:
Norris Hood
Age in 1910:
49
Birth Year:
abt 1861
Birthplace:
Missouri
Home in 1910:
Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri
Race:
White
Gender:
Male
Relation to Head of House:
Head
Marital Status:
Married
Spouse’s Name:
Maud Hood
Father’s Birthplace:
Tennessee
Mother’s Birthplace:
Illinois
Household Members:
Norris Hood 49
Maud Hood 37
Roy Hood 21
Charley Hood 19
Harrie Hood 17
Rubie Hood 16
John Hood 14
Maggie Hood 12
Mary Hood 6
(20)

Norris Hood–1910 Jasper County–is not Bud Hood. Both of Bud’s parents were born in Tennessee, and 1910 Norris’s mother’s birthplaceis identified as Illinois. I have an idea that Norris Hood (1910 Census) is probably a member of the David K. Hood family, who remained in Jasper County. Will save that for a later article. Additionally, Bud Hood was born in Jasper County, Missouri April 16, 1863. Norris Hood of the 1910 entry was born in Jasper County, Missouri in August 1860.

When the Civil War intensified, Norris Franklin Hood, Sr. signed up to fight. He joined the Confederate 11th Missouri Infantry 11th Regiment, Missouri Infantry Company A. Some people think this was a Union regiment. According to his military papers, the Missouri 11th was Confederate(21). The Joel Owensby Hood branch of the Hood family retained southern sympathies and left Jasper County, Missouri. After leaving Missouri, they did not return–especially after John Bass Jones’ murder!

Norris died February 17, 1863 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas. I don’t know whether he was killed in a skirmish or whether he died of an illness. Three years later, Nancy Jane married William Washington Hood (1837-1902), a brother of Norris. They remained in Jasper County, Missouri, and left after the John Bass Jones murder. They were in Arkansas and McDonald County, Missouri for a while, and then moved on to Texas, settling first in Johnson County and next in Palo Pinto. They returned to Benton County, Arkansas by 1900, where William Hood died November 20, 1902. Nancy Jane returned to Texas, and she died in Claude, Armstrong, Texas on March 15, 1929. The children of Nancy Jane Jones and William Washington Hood follow:

a. Joel Augustus “Gus” Hood (1868-1953). Joel Augustus Hood was born in Arkansas December 2, 1868, and he died April 10, 1953 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. He is buried in the Claude Cemetery. His wife was Lurena Bell (1874-1943). Their children were: (i) Myrtle Lee Hood (1895-1982); (ii) Charles Franklin Hood (1898-1948); and (iii) Dessie B. Hood (1902-1994).

b. William Warren Hood (1869-1944). William Warren Hood was born November 1, 1869 in McDonald County, Missouri, and he died May 26, 1944 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. His wife was Claudine Brunell Chauveneau (1880-1961). She was born in St. Etienne, France. Their children were: (i) Paul Hood (1899-1985); (ii) Mamie Hood (1900-1942); (iii) Ruth Hood (1901-1984); (iv) Francis “Fat” Hood (1903-1963); (v) Leona Rebecca Hood (1907-1992); (vi) Joe Hood (1912-1968).

c. Hugh Anderson Hood (1875-1930). Hugh Anderson Hood was born July 1, 1875 in Johnson County, Texas, and he died after 1930 possibly in Vernon, Willbarger, Texas. His wife was Anna Arabella Stafford, who was born in 1874. Their children were: (i) Hugh Franklin “Frank” Hood (1897-1961); (ii) Irene Hood, born 1899; (iii) Ethel Hood, born 1902; (iv) Jack Hood (1911-1991; (v) Edith Hood (1913-1914)

d. Finis Abel “Coon” Hood (1878-1938). Finis Abel Hood was born February 8, 1878 in Palo Pinto, Texas, and he died October 2, 1938 in Armstrong County, Texas. His wife was Jesse Mason, born 1882. Their children were: (i) Lonnie Hood, born 1902; (ii) Willie Hood, born 1904; (iii) Robert Hood, born 1908; (iv) Edwin Hood (b. 1912); (v) Owen Hood (b. 1915); Floy Hood (b. 1919.

***

7. James Riley Jones (1835-1868). James Riley Jones was born about 1835 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died before November 21, 1868 in Jasper County, Missouri. He appears on the 1850 and 1860 Census records for Jasper County, Missouri.

A Mystery: Mary Jane Jones (1832-1910)

I found Mary Jane Jones (1832-1910) listed as a child of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence on a number of Ancestry trees. To date, I do not know whether she should be listed with them. Her parents are identified on her death certificate as L and Unknown Jones(22). She was born October 11, 1832 in Greenville, Green County, Tennessee, which is in the southeastern part of the state. To my knowledge, Lewis Spence and Milly Catherine Jones never lived in Greenville. So I am inclined to believe that she was not one of their children. She married Jotham Franklin Weston (1827-1865) in Greenville. The family relocated to Sullivan County, Missouri, where they appear to have had no connection with the Jasper County people. A summary of her Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:

Birth: Oct. 11, 1832
Greeneville
Greene County
Tennessee, USA
Death: Aug. 25, 1910
Sullivan County
Missouri, USA

Daughter of L and (Unknown) Jones

Mo. Death Cert. #26203

Family links:
Spouse:
Jotham F Weston (____ – 1865)*

Children:
Columbus Page Weston (1852 – 1931)*
William Barton Weston (1856 – 1943)*
Lucinda Catherine Weston West (1859 – 1945)*
Leroy F Weston (1862 – 1913)*
Eliza Ann Weston Stringer (1864 – 1917)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Campground Cemetery
Osgood
Sullivan County
Missouri, USA

Created by: Theron Dowell
Record added: Oct 05, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21979397(23)

To Be Continued in Part Eight With The Third Jones Family

References

(1) 1820 Census about Lewis Jones for Perry County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Davidson County, Tennessee Marriage Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) 1820 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) 1830 Census for Lewis Jones, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Missouri Marriage Records for Daniel Jones and Rebecca Jones, Barry County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about Daniel Columbus Warren, dated March 10, 1931. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about Asbury Franklin Eddleman, dated September 17, 1925. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) 1850 Census for Nancy Warren, Franklin County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Franklin County, Missouri Records about Nelson Warren and Mrs. Nancy Park. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles about Lewis M. Warren. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) U.S., Union Soldiers Compiled Service Records, 1861-1865 about Lewis M. Warren. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) Mary Warren Birdwell Obituary, Dallas News (1938). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14) Kentucky Marriages, 1851-1900 about Lewis M. Jones and Sarah Jane Adams. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) 1870 Census, Greene County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Gravestone Photo for Louis M. Warren, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17) 1880 Census for Elizabeth Ady, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18) 1920 Census for Julia Maria Cloyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 9 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) California Death Index for Dale Miller. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 9 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20) 1910 Federal Census for Norris Hood, Jasper County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21) U.S. Soldiers Compiled Service Records and Profile, 1861-1865 about Norris F. Hood. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22) Mo. Death Cert. #26203 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Cited in Find-a-Grave Memorial 21979397 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(23) Find-a-Grave Memorial #21979397 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Six: Playing the Naming Game: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and the Roden/Wroughton Factor

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Elisha Spence, his ancestors and their descendants possessed a common habit: whenever someone had a child, he or she would be assigned a name for someone else in the family. I noticed this in my research and as a result, began looking for possible namesakes in the family. And then I hit a stumbling block with Elisha and Susanna Spence’s oldest daughter. Milly Catherine Spence? Was she named for one person or for two? When I could find no Milly or Catherine or Milly Catherine who would qualify in the Spence families, I turned my attention to the Spencer line where I recently discovered my answer.

Sheer frustration drove me downstairs to my collection of research notebooks early last week. I couldn’t write about Milly Catherine Spence until finding the person she was named for! Approximately thirty to forty notebooks line the shelves of my writing bookcase. They even spill out onto the floor beside the case where they are piled high. These notebooks comprise all of my research notes dating back to the early 1990s. I taught morning classes back in those early days. My afternoons were spent in the Denver Public Library or in our campus library looking for answers. I saved all my notes, right or wrong. It is amusing now to look over those notes and see how many directions I undertook before charting a definite course. Such is the case with my old South Carolina notebook. I found it wedged behind other notebooks on the case. And I also found the answer I was seeking. Milly Catherine Spence was named after John Spencer’s first wife!

I’ve already recounted my failed attempts in identifying John Spencer’s first wife. I encountered significant problems in identifying both wives until DNA matches settled the matter concerning the second. The first wife remained a dilemma. At one time, I thought she was Milly Catherine Duncan, John Duncan’s daughter. But that Milly Catherine married Isaac Farmer. They moved to another part of South Carolina, and she lived until 1837. I found another record indicating that a John Spencer married a Sarah (last name unknown)–but then that John Spencer wasn’t mine. So I was back at the drawing board once again. Then in my South Carolina notebook, I found some interesting clues. The first is a passage from South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) regarding the early Baptist Churches in Chester County, South Carolina:

One of the ministers in Sandy River congregation in 1791 was Rev. William Woodward, who, because of the distance from the old church, gathered a distinct group on Lower or Little Sandy River in 1789; this body received separate constitution in 1792. Mr. Woodward then became the minister of the new church and remained in that position until his death. He was assisted for a time after 1793 by Mr. Vandiver, a candidate for the ministry. f643 The church tried Amos Layard’s gift but refused to license him: it extended “Brother Gents’ license of exhortation to preach any place where a door may be opened.” Brother Simonton was apparently treasurer, but it was later decided that this function should belong to the deacon’s office, and Brother Redmond replaced Mr. Simonton. Cases for discipline brought up in the early years include two for joining the Masons, and the authority of the church was strong enough to cause the offending brethren to promise either not to meet with the Masons or to leave the order entirely. The church insisted upon strict observance of the Sabbath, James Hand should have started to market on Monday or Tuesday and thus have avoided traveling and working his horses and slaves on Sunday, as he was forced to do by starting on Friday; other members were reprimanded for walking or riding over their farms on Sunday. A resolution to allow grievances to be laid before the deacons prior to being submitted to the church was soon rescinded. In an interesting trial of a woman accused of knowingly marrying a man already married, the woman’s opinion that the trial committee was prejudiced caused the church to allow her to choose the majority of a new committee which reported in her favor. f644 The membership of Lower Sandy River rose from fifty in 1792 to fifty-five in 1794, but when it entered the Bethel Association in 1803, it numbered thirtytwo. f645 The church is said to have had three buildings, the first on land of Eli Cornwell on Sandy River. About 1800 it was decided to remove the church to a more convenient location. A group of trustees consisting of Elder William Woodward, Richard Evans, James Huey, Daniel Tressels, Henry Carter, Mason Huey, Jacob Dungan, Nobley Coates, and Neguens Whitted bought on October 11, 1802, a lot for three hundred dollars upon which a second wooden building “was erected beyond the cemetery in the direction of Chester” five miles from Chester on the Ashford ferry road. f646 The branch of Pacolet on Fishing Creek, which claims to have been organized in 1792, was so well established in 1793 and 1794 as to have supplies appointed for it by the Bethel Association. Its separate constitution must have taken place in 1795, as in that year Pacolet dismissed nineteen members, and a new church on Fishing Creek called Hopewell entered the Bethel Association. The new church had no minister until 1801 or 1802, when Rev. Samuel Eccles took up the work. He probably remained with the church only through 1803, after which Samuel McCreary, who was at that time a licensed minister, must have preached for them. Hopewell had few members until stirred by the great revival. f647(1)

From South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) by Leah Townsend:
Ahimaas Spencer, 189n, 193, 224+
John Roden, 141+
William Roden, 141n, 147, 147n
William a member of Pacolet, which became Skull Shoals in 1787(2),(3)

I had forgotten all about the Roden family. When I discovered this item in my notebook, I remember writing the name down.

Then came another discovery! While searching into their records, I discovered that I had “danced” with them before!

“Roden” was originally “Wroughton”–a family discussed in my third book: Chasing the Wild Bunch: One Woman’s Journey. The Wroughtens resided in Dorchester County, Maryland. While researching them several years ago, I had no idea that a line of their descendants eventually settled in Chester County, South Carolina!

The Roden/Wroughton Factor

Mary Catherine (“Milly” Catherine) Roden was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in Greenville County, South Carolina. It was still 96 District at the time of her death and did not become Greenville County until 1786(4). She was the daughter of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807) and Mary Potts (1720-1785), the granddaughter of John Roden, Sr. (1685-1720) and Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), and the great granddaughter of William Wroughton (1663-1746) and Hannah Meredith (1663-1689). It appears that the elder William had three wives: Hannah Meredith (1663-1689), Hannah Susannah “Anna” Mace (1660-1702), and Rachel Wingate (1668-1746). William Wroughton comprised a small section of the book I previously mentioned, so I’ll deal with him first.

A Quaker, William Wroughton was a prominent individual in Dorchester County. When he died May 18, 1746, he left his estate to his oldest son Thomas, provided for his beloved wife, Rachel, and also provided for her daughter Rachel Wroughton, who subsequently married a Pritchett(5). When I conducted my original research on William Wroughton several years ago, I lamented that many of the records were jumbled. It was difficult finding two people who agreed on anything since original Dorchester County, Maryland records were destroyed over time. Based upon my earlier research and the research I have recently completed, the following is an outline for his family:

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Meredith:
1. Thomas Wroughton (1684-1765)–his father’s chief heir. Thomas was born in 1684 in Dorchester County, Maryland, and he died May 4, 1765. I have no additional information about him.
2. John Wroughton/Roden, Sr. (1685-1720)–Mary “Milly Catherine Roden’s grandfather. John was born in 1685 in Dorchester County, and he died April 24, 1720 in Calvert County, Maryland. His wife was Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), the daughter of Edward Winman (1640-1702) and Mary (last name unknown). A story about John and his wife follows:

Notes:
John was apparently brought up in Dorchester County, Maryland. He met Elizabeth Winman, who was also being courted by George Wade, Jr. Apparently John was the more persistent of the two in his pursuit of Elizabeth, for they were married in May of 1706(6).

It is possible that John learned a lesson from his brother, Henry, which I will discuss later. It is also interesting to note that shortly after John died in 1720, his wife married George Wade.(7)

The children of John and Elizabeth Wroughton/Roden follow:

(a) John Roden (1707-1787). John was christened March 7, 1707 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(8), and he died in 1787 in South Carolina. I have no additional information about him.
(b) William Roden (1710-1770William was christened October 11, 1710 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(9), and he died in 1770 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife has been identified as Jane Winman (1712-1762), who may have been a cousin. Their children were: (i) Thomas Roden (1731-1793); (ii) Jeremiah Roden (1737-1821); (iii) William Roden (1738-1799); (iv) John Roden (1739-1821); (v) George Roden (1743-1836); (vi) Zadock Roden (1745-1794). William’s second wife was Mary Willifield.
(c) Sarah Roden, who was christened November 16, 1713 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(10). I have no additional information about her.
(d) Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)–Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father. I will detail her family separately.
(e) Ann Roden–I only have her name
(f) Susannah Roden–I only have her name.

What I have learned from these names is that Susannah/Susanna was as much of a Roden/Wroughton name as it was a Toney name! John Roden settled in Frederick County, Maryland. John’s sons moved to South Carolina.

3. William Wroughton (1686-1738). William was born in Dorchester County and died there. He died before his father. I have no information about him.

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Mace:

1. Dorcas Wroughton (b. 1690). I have no additional information.
2. Henry Wroughton (1695-1747). The note on my ancestral tree reads: “Betrothal to 2nd cousin, Mary Meredith, but the marriage did not take place. Mary married James Robert Ingram”(11).

Mary Meredith (1695-1712) and James Robert Ingram (1692-1757) were my my sixth great grandparents on my father’s Inghram line and James Robert Ingram is my fifth great grandfather on my father’s Stillians line–hence my earlier comment concerning John Roden’s wooing of his wife Elizabeth Winman! (I know nothing else about Henry Wroughton).

3. Josias Wroughton (1695-1761). [He may have been Henry’s twin.] Josias lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing more about him, although he did acquire a property in Dorchester County called Lazy Hill on November 15, 1728(12).
4. Ambrose Wroughton (1700-1747). Ambrose lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing else about him.

As already noted, William Wroughten and his third wife Rachel Wingate had one daughter: Rachel Wroughten, who was born about 1703 and who married a Pritchett.

The Family of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)

Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. was born in 1715 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died July 7, 1807 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Potts (1720-1785). According to an paragraph attached to my ancestral tree (original author unknown):

Thomas was one of the earliest Roden’s in Chester County, S.C. and he probably came with his brothers Zadoc, John Sr., William, and Jeremiah. Thomas owned 1,172 acres in Camden County. This grant received of the Rt. Hon. Charles Gercil Montagu, the governor of Normandon and Chief of the Province of S.C. Thomas’ estate was administerd 7-17-1809 by Richard Wilkes, with Wm. Wilkes and Alex Wilson. He was in Chester County as of 1764, purchasing land to which his brother, John Sr. was a witness.(13)

Thomas’s brother William had a son named Zadock, so that may be the reference here. The important thing about this paragraph is that it provides a Chester County entry date of 1764 for Thomas.

Thomas married Mary Potts in Anne Arundel County in 1732. A discussion of their family follows:

1. John Roden (1740-1807) John Roden was born in 1740 in Maryland and he died October 6, 1821 in Chester County, South Carolina. I have no additional information for him.

2. George Roden (b. 1743) George was born March 25, 1743 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died in Kentucky. The date of his death is unknown but it would have been after February 27, 1834 in Graves County, Kentucky George’s story unfolds in his Application for a Pension for Service in the Revolutionary War:

State of Kentucky Graves County: On this 27th day of February 1834 personally appeared before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County and state aforesaid George Rowdon aged ninety years and eleven months a resident of the said County of Graves and State aforesaid who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated (to wit) he states that he was born in the County of Calvert and State of Maryland on the 25th day of March 1743 (he once had a record of his age but it is now lost out of his possession) — this declarant’s father moved with him from Calvert County Maryland where he deponent was a child said 4 or 5 years old & settled in Frederick County Virginia on the Shenandoah River where this declarant lived with his father until about the year 1763 when he with his father migrated to Camden district in the State of South Carolina. That he first entered the service of the United States in the said district of Camden in State of South Carolina in the month of May in the year 1778 as a private drafted militia man and was placed under the command of Captain John Winn with whom he marched on an expedition against Saint Augustine in East Florida he joined (near Augusta in Georgia) a large corps of troops under the command of General Robert Howe — with whom he marched as far as the Oconee River where he was ordered to stop & stayed with a sick man by Captain Winn and gave him a written order for that purpose he stayed with this sick man (who was afflicted with a swelling in his groin) until the month of September 1778 when he returned home with him where he arrived in the latter part of September 1778 he states that he was in the service of the United States 4 months and 2 weeks this tour to wit under Captain John Winn & General Robert Howe – in the year 1778 and that he received no written discharge. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 2nd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of April 1779 Savannah in Georgia was at this time occupied by the British which caused the Tory population of South Carolina to be troublesome to quell which mounted companies of militia man were kept in continual motion this declarant joined one of these mounted companies at the time and place above stated as a volunteer private furnishing his own horse he states that he entered for 6 months & that the said company was raised by order of General Richard Winn of the South Carolina militia and that said company was placed under the command of Captain __ Threewitts [sic, Threewits] with whom this declarant marched to the plantation of Ankram [sic, Ancrum] on the Congaree [River] where they kept their head quarters about 3 months ranging over & protecting the country from Ancrum’s this declarant with Captain Threewits marched to Orangeburg where they remained stationed 3 months after which this declarant was discharged by Captain Threewits he states that he served 6 months this tour under Captain Threewits and that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 3rd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina as a drafted private militia man he was drafted for a 6 months tour of duty and was placed in a company commanded by Captain John James he marched with Captain James in the month of March 1782 a place called the four holes not far from Charleston at which place he joined a considerable corps of drafted militia under the command of Colonel Hopkins he remained in the service under these officers stationed occasionally at the four holes until the month of September 1780 in which months he was discharged by Captain James he states that he served 6 months under the above named officers at the time above stated. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 4th time as a mounted volunteer private militia man furnishing his own horse he entered in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of January 1781 under Captain John McCool & marched with Captain McCool & his company in pursuit of the Tory Colonel Will Cunningham [“Bloody Bill” Cunningham] date pursued the Tories to the Congaree & down that River some distance and after scouring the country for some time we returned home when your declarant was disbanded with the rest of the company by Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he states he served one month under Captain McCool & that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 5th time immediately after his return from the expedition under Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he was drafted as a private this time by order of General Richard Winn for 4 months in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina he entered under Captain Lyles & marched to Orangeburg where we joined a Regiment under Colonel Hopkins he states that he remained with Colonel Hopkins at Orangeburg 4 months when he was discharged by Captain Lyles he states that he served 4 months this time under Captain Lyles & Colonel Hopkins he was discharged in the month of June 1781. This declarant served his 6th tour of duty as a private in the year 1781 he was drafted in the said district of Camden and State of South Carolina for a 3 months tour of duty he entered in the month of July 1781 and was placed in a company commanded by Captain __ Martin he marched with Captain Martin to join General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] but did not reach General Green in consequence of some misconduct of Captain Martin who these are did his company in the beginning of September 1781 just before the battle of the Eutaw Springs. In consequence of which desertion the whole company returned home he states that he served 2 months this tour under Captain Martin. Thus your declarant served 4 months and 2 weeks in the year 1778 under Captain John Winn & General Howe; 6 months under Captain Threewits in the year 1779 — 6 months under Captain John James & Colonel Hopkins in the year 1780 — one month in the same year under Captain John McCool — 4 months under Captain Lyles and Colonel Hopkins in the year 1781 and 2 months in the same year under Captain Martin making in the whole one year and 11 months and 2 weeks besides a variety of small scouting tours which she has not enumerated. He states that he has long since lost all his discharges and that he has no documentary evidence of his services and that he knows of no living witness by whom he can prove his services he states that Asa Dodson, Talbot E. Slaydon, John Clapp, Adam Clapp and Henderson Gregory etc. all his neighbors who will bear ample testimony to his character for veracity and as to his reputation of having been a soldier of the revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state or Territory whatever. This declarant states that he moved from Camden district South Carolina to Warren County Tennessee in the year 1817 & from thence he moved to Madison County Alabama in the year 1821 & from thence he moved to Graves County Kentucky in the year 1830 where he has resided ever since & where he at present resides.
S/ George Rowdon Subscribed & sworn to before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County & state aforesaid S/ Matthias Travis, JP [William Holifield, a clergyman, and Ervin Anderson gave the standard supporting affidavit.](14)

I find it interesting that George Roden and Levi Spence (Elisha Spence’s second son) were in Graves County, Kentucky about the same period of time. Levi Spence is the subject of Part 5 of this series.

3. William Roden (1745-1800). A copy of William’s will follows. He was born in 1745 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died September 5, 1800 at Brushy Fork, Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Margaret (1745-1805), by whom he had a son–Jonathan Roden (1775-1854). A copy of the will follows. To view it, click on the image:

William Roden 1800 Will

William Roden 1800 Will(15)

***

4. MARY CATHERINE (“MILLY CATHERINE”) RODEN (1754-1784). Mary was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in 96 District, South Carolina (what would become Greenville County in 1786). Judging from available Ancestry trees, a number of family researchers believed a child named Mary was in this family, but they knew nothing else about her. Mary’s name is listed as either Mary?? or as Unknown Daughter.

There is an interesting story about Mary. When she was little and people asked her about her name, she would pronounce it “Miwy Catrin!” The family began calling her “Milly!” And so she became known as Milly Catherine from that day forward. And there is something else quite interesting about Milly Catherine Roden. She was probably some degree of cousin with Caroline Toney, although I haven’t discovered that connection as yet. Milly married John Spencer (1750-1801) in Chester County, South Carolina in 1769, and returned with him to 96 District. Milly Catherine and John would have three sons. I’ve already discussed them earlier, so I will not go into detail here. However, I will list them separately and add additional information I have discovered about them:

Levi Spencer (1770-1844). (A Levi Roden will appear in one of the family groups listed below. They were born about the same period of time. One of them was named for the other. And, of course and as already noted, Levi Spence was named after Levi Spencer). I have figured out why Levi Spencer opted to go to Georgia. A number of his Roden cousins went from South Carolina to Alabama first and then to Georgia. Some of those cousins also went to Alabama and to Georgia by way of Tennessee.

John David Spencer (1775-1820). I’m beginning to think that this was the father’s full time: John David Spencer, Sr.! The argument is well-founded because John David’s grandfather’s full name was William David Spencer. The elder William used his middle name for two sons: William David Spencer and John David Spencer. Young John David was named for his father and his grandfather.

Thomas Spencer (1784-1810). Milly died giving birth to Thomas. He is named for her father: Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. I don’t know his middle name as yet, but his full name may be Thomas Roden Spencer!

John Spencer married Caroline Toney after Milly’s death. This wasn’t a chance meeting. He went to Virginia where he married her. They stayed in Virginia for a couple of years and then returned to Greenville County. He met her through his first wife. I think the two women were closely connected. I also believe Caroline went to 96 District to help Milly with the boys. Two children were born of John Spencer’s second marriage:

Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer (1785-1810).–my fifth great grandmother! The name Susanna is both a Toney name and a Roden name. Her middle name was Roden and was eventually changed to Rhoda. That is a Toney, Roden, and a Spence name. She became Elisha Spence’s first wife. I also now believe she was specifically named for Jeremiah Roden’s wife. [See below.] [ALSO SEE LINK TO UPDATE AT THE END OF THIS ARTICLE.]

Abraham Spencer (1788-1865). I don’t know the source for Abraham Spencer. I would say it is a Spencer name. It may have also been a Roden name.

***

5. Jeremiah Roden (1754-1851). Jeremiah was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died January 1, 1851 in DeKalb County, Alabama. He would have been Milly’s twin. Jeremiah fought in the Revolutionary War, but his pension application was eventually rejected the year after his death(16). His wife was Susanna Kirkland (1755-1855), whom he married April 28, 1784 in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Susanna Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Caroline Toney, may well have been named for her since Susanna Spencer was born the following year! And Jeremiah was Milly Catherine’s twin! Jeremiah and Susannah Roden had the following children: (a) Margaret Roden (1784-1874); (b) John B. Roden (1787-1876); (c) Jeremiah Roden (1792-1836); (d) Benjamin Roden (1795-1851); (e) Nancy Roden (1801-1880).

6. Thomas Winman Roden, Jr. (1758-1793). Thomas was born in 1758 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died in June 1793 in Chester County, South Carolina. Thomas is rather unique in the Thomas Sr. family. While his brothers fought on the side of the Patriots in the American Revolution, Thomas Jr. remained a loyalist. I believe his loyalty to England did not arise out of any great love for the Monarchy. For the most part, the Rodens were Baptists and according to Leah Townsend, some Baptist groups were “nonresistant” or pacifistic in sentiment(17). Thomas Jr. may have belonged to a pacifist Baptist group. I don’t know how this issue settled with the rest of his family, but I believe that he and the John Spencer family were close. I say this because of the “naming game” played out when Thomas and his sister Milly named their children. Thomas married Mary Brown (1758-1790) in Anne Arundel County, Maryland in 1732. Their children follow. [Note: I will expound on some of them because of their names.]

a. Thomas Roden, born 1774. He may have died young. I know nothing else about him.
b. Alice Roden (1776-1855). Alice was born in 1776 in Chester County, South Carolina, and she died in Chester County July 28, 1855. She married Richard Wilkes (1769-1840). Their children were: (i) Mary Wilkes (1795-1851); (ii) Thomas Wilkes (1796-1838); (iii) Martha Wilkes (1798-1859); (iv) Lydia Wilkes (1802-1842); (v) Nancy Wilkes, b. 1803; (vi) Regina Wilkes, b. 1805; (vii) John Wesley Wilkes (1809-1825)

c. LEVI RODEN (1779-1852). Levi was born nine years after Levi Spencer. He was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1779, and he died in Tippah, Mississippi on April 15, 1852. His wife was Malvina Selina Blank (1780-1842). Their children were: (a) Sarah Roden (1799-1870); (b) Allisee Frances Roden (1801-1880); (c) Spencer William Roden (1801-1856); (d) Elizabeth Frances Roden (1808-1878); (e) Polly Roden (1809-1850); (f) Joshua Emory Roden (1810-1894); (g) Lavinia Roden (1816-1866); (h) Savilla Roden (1820-1866); (i) Levicy Roden (b. 1822). His second wife was Elizabeth “Betty” Isbell (1799-1856). I believe she may well connect with the Isbell family I wrote about in my third book referenced above, but I haven’t confirmed that as yet.

d. John B. Franklin Roden (1785-1870). John was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1785, and he died in 1870 in DeKalb County, Alabama. His wife was Catherine Jane (Roden) (1796-1870). Their children were (a) Sarah “Sallie” Roden (1815-1865); (b) George Washington Roden (1821-1916); (c) John Harrison Roden (1826-1900); (d) Archibald C. Rodden (b. 1833); (e) Mary E. Roden (b. 1835).

e. WILLIAM SPENCER RODEN (1790-1850). William was born in 1790 in South Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Blount County, Alabama. He married Mary Catherine Mayfield (1792-1834) in 1810 in Alabama. Their children were: (i) William Brassell Roden (1812-1884); (ii) Malinda Roden (b. 1827); (iii) Miller Roden (b. 1834).

7. Savilla Roden (1759-1854).Savilla was born in Frederick County, Maryland in 1759, and she died July 23, 1844 in Clinton, Greene County, Alabama. She married Moses Hill about 1780 in Chester County, South Carolina. He died in 1821. Their children were: (a) Thomas Hill, born 1780; (b) James Hill, born 1782; (c) Elizabeth Harrison Hill (1793-1838); (d) Moses Berry Hill (1795-1824); (e) Harriet Windham Hill (b. 1801); (f)George Washington Hill (b. 1803); (g) Rebecca Carlisle Hill (1807-1842); (h) Littleton Hill; and (I) Sarah Hill.

***

After reviewing all my evidence, I have come to one conclusion!

John Spencer’s first wife was Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden.

I still have a lot of work to do on this. I hope to find the connecting link between the Toney family and the Wroughton/Roden family. All of that could take some time. (Well, look how long it has taken me to reach this point!)

The Wroughten/Roden family will be put on hold for a while. Now, I need to catch my breath and then turn my attention once again to the Spences.

This article has been updated. Click here for the update!

To Be Continued in Part Seven with Milly Catherine Spence and Lewis Jones

References

(1) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(2) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(3) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015).
(4) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015)
(4) William Wroughton Will, May 1746. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(5) “Rivers Through Time; The History of the Roden and Milwee Families” by Johnnie Geneva Roden Dole Gambel, Chap IV, Page 1. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(6) U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Elizabeth Winman Roden and George Wade. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about John Roden (Rhodin). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about William Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Sarah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches about Henry Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Settlers of Maryland (1679-1783) about Josias Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) Paragraph titled “Land” about Thomas Winman Roden, Sr., Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) George Roden (Rowden) Revolutionary War Application for Pension, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2014. Available online at: http://www.ancestry.com
(14) William Roden 1800 Will (Image of Transcription), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Dated Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900 about Jeremiah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Five: Levi James Spence (1801-1843) and Elizabeth Gray (1804-1883)

Birth: May 1, 1804 Death: Nov. 28, 1883 Inscription: wife of Levi Burial: New Liberty Cemetery Woodville McCracken County Kentucky, USA Created by: susan quinn Record added: Sep 16, 2013 Find A Grave Memorial# 117184444

Birth: May 1, 1804 Death: Nov. 28, 1883 Inscription: wife of Levi Burial: New Liberty Cemetery Woodville McCracken County Kentucky, USA Created by: susan quinn Record added: Sep 16, 2013 Find A Grave Memorial# 117184444

When I first began my Spence research over twenty years ago and discovered the name of Elisha and Susanna Spence’s second child, I noticed only a “J” for his middle name on various records. I presumed Levi’s middle name was “John” since Susanna’s father was John Spencer. While recently updating my research on Levi, I discovered the name “James” more frequently among his children than “John.” And after changing his name on my records to Levi James Spence, I began making some remarkable discoveries!

Levi James Spence was born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina on October 25, 1801–the second child and son of Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Susanna Spencer (1785-1810). He joined his older brother, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859), who was born in Greenville, South Carolina the previous year. The Spence family had moved to Mecklenburg County during the fall of 1800. Susanna’s father John Spencer (1750-1801) died in 1801. At the time of John Spencer’s death, the young Elisha Spence family was in the process of moving to Randolph County, North Carolina, a move they completed as soon as Susanna and the infant Levi were able to travel.

Randolph County, North Carolina had been a second home for Elisha Spence, so he was really glad to get back there. Shortly after his father’s death, he moved in with his uncle, James Spence (1730-1804). James would only live for three years after Elisha’s return and would pass away in 1804. After his uncle’s death, Elisha often traveled back and forth between Randolph and Pasquotank and Camden Counties. Many of his friends and family members had already moved to Tennessee. Elisha planned to do just that, especially after the Jones families’ departure.

Young Samuel and the infant Levi were oblivious to all the excitement. Pasquotank and Camden Counties meant a great deal of fawning by family and friend admirers. While the men huddled in one corner of the porch talking about matters of importance to them, the women gathered in another area to talk about their interests. The children took Samuel and Levi under their care and entertained them in the yard. Then the fiddles came out at night, followed by singing and dancing. Levi would not remember those earlier times, but Samuel recalled many of them. For his part, Levi remembered a family who frequented those occasions. He was three years old when presented with a new infant member of that family.

“Look, Levi!” his mother told him. “See the new baby? Isn’t she pretty?”

Levi peered into the sleeping face of the baby.

“Her name is Elizabeth Gray!”

***

Elizabeth Gray was born May 1, 1804 in Pasquotank County, North Carolina to Thornton Gray (1775-1830) and Mary Frances Porter (1785-1819). Three years apart in age, young Levi Spence and Elizabeth Gray became inseparable whenever the Spences were in the area. This childhood romance continued to grow over the coming years.

The Pasquotank Gray, Russell and Porter Families

Finding this Gray family was like looking for a needle in the haystack. A number of Grays settled in North Carolina–some connected by blood while others were only connected by name. A major branch of the family settled in Stafford County, Virginia, many of whom relocated to Pasquotank, North Carolina. Another branch settled in Dobbs County in an area that became Lenoir County in 1791. Still another branch found lodging in Randolph County, while others settled in Mecklenburg. The only clues I had to this confusion consisted of two names: Thornton Gray and his wife Frances. Beyond that, I knew nothing more.

Neither did anyone else!

Then, finally, I experienced a breakthrough. The following is a brief summary of the early family.

This Gray story begins with twin brothers: Thornton Gray (1729-1776) and Griffen Gray (1729-1775). They appear to have been the sons of Alexander Gray (1701-1765) and his second wife Margaret Thynne (1707-1729), who died in childbirth with the boys(1). Alexander Gray was born June 1, 1701 in Melrose, Roxburghshire, Scotland to Alexander Gray and Elizabeth Porteous(2). His first wife’s name is unknown, but their son was Nathaniel Gray (1717-1777). Nathaniel’s line first settled in Stafford County, Virginia and eventually relocated to Pasquotank County, North Carolina and elsewhere. After the death of his first wife, Alexander married Margaret Tynne, by whom he had the twins. Margaret died in childbirth with the twins, and the following year, Alexander married Catherine Dabymple Wilson, who was born in 1707. They had a number of children:

1. Margaret Gray, b. 1732
2. Euphram Gray, b. 1734
3. Rachel Gray, b. 1734
4. Amelia Gray, b. 1735
5. Janet Gray, b. 1736
6. Alexander Gray (1736-1791)
7. Katherine Gray, b. 1737
8. William Gray, b. 1738
9. George Gray, b. 1740
10. James Gray, b. 1744(3)

My focus here is on the twins, Thornton and Griffen. I provide the rest of the information for background that represents the sum and substance of my current research. My research is by no means completed. So many of the Gray records have been jumbled, it is difficult to find two people who agree with one another. The absence of official or original records makes the process much more difficult. With this in mind, I will focus the rest of the Gray material on the twins.

Alexander Gray, the father of the twins, died October 5, 1767 in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, and is buried in Holyroodhouse, Midlothian, Scotland(4). It appears Thornton and Griffen left Scotland for North Carolina prior to their father’s death. To date I have only found one record with both names on it in North Carolina: the 1775 Militia List for Pasquotank County(5). Griffen may have died that year since that is the only record I have found bearing his name. Thornton Gray married Elizabeth (last name unknown). Thornton Gray’s 1776 Will Abstract identifies his children(6):

1. Julian (Julia/Juliana) Gray (1760-1804)–an important link with the Spence family. Julian first married a Williams (first name unknown.) Their children were: (a) Jean [Williams] Spence, b. 1785; and (b) Elizabeth [Williams] Spence (b. 1786). Her second husband was Samuel Spence (1760-1805)(7). Samuel Spence’s parents were Joseph Spence (1700-1783) and Louisa Sarah Rencher (1700-1783). Samuel descends from the Alexander Spence/Dorothy Truman line and Elisha descends from the James Spence/Esther Booth line, creating a cousin connection between them. According to my Ancestry calculator, this Samuel Spence is my 2nd cousin 7 times removed! Samuel and Julian Spence’s children were:

(a) Newton Enoch Spence (1788-1870). Newton would die in Rutherford County, Tennessee;
(b) Rencher Spence (1788-1870). Rencher would also die in Rutherford County, Tennessee;
(c) Joseph Spence (1790-1829);
(d) Brittain Spence (1791-1829). Brittain would also die in Rutherford County, Tennessee;
(e) Luckey Spence, b. 1800(8).

Newton, Rencher and Brittain would relocate to Davidson County, Tennessee with Elisha Spence. I have referenced them in my earlier article: “The Mystery of William Spence (1795-1869)”, which is the first article in the Spence series.

2. Thornton Gray (1775-1830)–the grandfather of little Elizabeth Gray. Thornton was born in 1775 in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, and he died before 1830 in New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina(9). His wife was Mary Frances Porter (1785-1819). (She would be known as Frances). They would have three children:

(a) Thornton Gray (1802-1850). Thornton would marry Elizabeth Ann Russell (1829-1917). She was the daughter of William Russell (1800-1835) and Rhoda Elizabeth (surname unknown). [Note: This is the source of the Rhoda name in the Spence family!] Their children were:

(i) Mary Gray, b. 1844;
(ii) Thomas Russell Gray (b. 1848);
(iii) Elizabeth Frances Gray (b. 1850)(10)

Thornton Gray (b. 1775) died in McCracken County, Kentucky after the 1850 Census. His wife–Elizabeth Ann Russell–will reappear in the next entry.

3. Charles Porter Gray (1819-1890). Charles was born October 27, 1819 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died April 4, 1890 in Albany, Clinton, Kentucky. His mother died in childbirth while delivering him. After his mother’s death, his father Thornton Gray remarried. The name of his wife is unknown, but she may have been a widow with children. By 1820, Thornton moved his family to New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina, where they appear on the 1820 Census. Thornton Sr. died before the 1830 Census was taken. Charles became a lawyer, and he settled in Albany, Clinton, Kentucky. Shortly after his brother Thornton’s death in 1850, Charles married Thornton’s widow that same year–Elizabeth Ann Russell (1829-1917). Their children were:

(i)Rhoda C. Gray (Tuggle) (1852-1921)
(ii) Lucy G. Gray (b. 1855)
(iii) Mary Frances Gray (1857-1937)
(iv) William N. Gray (b. 1860)
(v) Shel C. Gray (1862-1892)
(vi) Susan H. Gray (Noland) (1865-1935)
(vii) Nancy E. Gray (b. 1867)
(viii) Amanda T. Gray (b. 1871)
(ix) James McAllen Gray (1874-1953)(11)

Elizabeth Ann Russell Gray died December 26, 1917 in Celina, Clay, Tennessee.

The other children of Thornton Gray (1729-1776) and Elizabeth are identified in his will abstract. As yet, I have not discovered dates for them:

Name
Thornton Gray

Probate Year
1776

Estimated Death Year
Abt 1776

Full Abstract
1776 GRAY, THORNTON, Elizabeth (wife); Judah, Catherine, Julia, Barthema, Thornton(12).

Julia is Juliana/Julian, the wife of Samuel Spence (1760-1805)

***

Contrary to my presumption in Part Four, Levi James Spence did not go to Perry County, Tennessee in 1820 with his brothers, Samuel and Daniel. The Thornton Gray family, including Levi’s beloved Elizabeth, planned to head back to North Carolina. Levi wasn’t going to risk losing her to someone else. So he went to North Carolina with the Grays, where he appears on the 1820 Census in Lenoir County. Thornton set him up there with relatives, but Levi was back in Pasquotank County every weekend. He and Elizabeth were married in New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina in 1824. After Thornton’s death, they returned to Tennessee and settled in Madison County.

The children of Levi James Spence and Elizabeth Gray follow:

1. James Russell Spence (1825-aft 1900). James Russell Spence was born May 16, 1825 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died after 1900 in Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky. On April 15, 1852, he married Nancy Jane Moore (1831-1877) in McCracken County, Kentucky. Their children were: (a) Albert H. Spence, b. 1853; (b) Malcolm G. “Mack” Spence, b 1855; (c) Medora “Dora” Spence, b. 1857; (d) Eugene Spence, b. 1860; (e) William Spence, b. 1864; (f) James Samuel Spence, b. 1869. His second wife was Sarah Byard (b. 1846). They had one daughter: Flossie Spence (b. 1879). Sarah was a widow and had a son by her previous marriage: Henry C. Byard (b. 1872)
2. Thornton Spence, b. 1827. He may have died young. I can find nothing else about him.
3. Mark Spence (1829-1852). Mark was born May 17, 1829 in Madison County, Tennessee, and he died of cholera in St. Louis, Missouri on September 27, 1852. He appears to have remained single.
4. William W. Spence (1832-1910). William was born January 17, 1832 in Tennessee, and he died after 1910 in Paducah, McCracken, Kentucky. He married Mary Ann Moore (1833-1920) on October 26, 1859 in McCracken County Kentucky. Their children were: (a) John W. Spence (1861-1924); and (b) Thomas Duncan Spence (1865-1947).
5. Joseph Martin Spence (1834-1914). Joseph was born October 26, 1834 in Graves County, Kentucky, and he died June 13, 1914 in Oxford, Sumner County, Kansas. On August 27, 1856, he married Elizabeth Jane Browning (1836-1906) in McCracken County, Kentucky. Their children were: (a) William Henry Spence, who was born August 20, 1857 in McCracken County, Kentucky and who died in 1925 in Oxford, Sumner, Kansas; (b)Jacob A. “Jack” Spence, who was born November 1861 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died in 1925 in Sumner County, Kansas; (c) Thomas Spence (1863-1935), who was born March 24, 1863 in Paducah, McCracken, Kentucky, and who died December 13, 1935 in Arcadia, Oklahoma; (d) James Eli Spence (Eli James Spence–he used the name Eli), who was born September 1864 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died before 1910 in Guthrie, Logan, Oklahoma; (e) Mary June Spence, who was born September 1866 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died in 1942 in Oxford, Sumner, Kansas; (f) Deelan B Spence, who was born June 1870 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died before 1880 in McCracken County, Kentucky; (g) Lou Ella Spence, who was born about 1872 in McCracken County, Kentucky, and who died after 1880 in McCracken County, Kentucky; (h) Lottie Spence, who was born October 1, 1874 in Paducah, McCracken, Kentucky, and who died August 14, 1955 in Kansas.
5. Elizabeth Frances Spence (1836-1925). Elizabeth was born in Kentucky December 22, 1836, and she died in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 31, 1925. On January 29, 1857, she married John William Wyatt (1829-1876) in McCracken County, Kentucky. Their children were: (a) Medora Mary Wyatt (1857-1884); (b) Virginia E. Wyatt, born 1860; (c) James Lewis Wyatt (1862-1935); (d) John Melvin Wyatt (1866-1949); (e) Allen A. Wyatt, b. 1873.
6. Thomas J. (James) Spence (1839-1928). Thomas was born May 9, 1839 in Tennessee, and he died April 15, 1928 in Sumner County, Kansas. His wife’s name was Malena. Their children were: (a) James C. Spence (1867-1947); (b) Thomas Levi Spence (1871-1930); (c) Fannie M. Spence, born 1879; (d) William P. Spence, born 1884.
7. Littleton F. Spence (1843-1876). Littleton was born about 1843 in Kentucky, and he died January 19, 1876 in McCracken County, Kentucky. His wife was Alice B. Crawford (1848-1916). They had one known child: Edward Spence, who was born in October 1869 in McCracken County, Kentucky(13).

Howard and I lived in Bowling Green Kentucky from 1969 until 1970. We drove through Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky numerous times while traveling between Bowling Green and Farmington, Missouri in order to visit Howard’s parents. I did not realize I had all these ancestors living in McCracken County! My Grandfather Spence once thought his father’s family originated in Kentucky. They didn’t, but a large number of family members certainly settled there!

***

When Levi and Elizabeth Gray Spence returned to Tennessee, they settled in Madison County, where they appear on the 1830 Censes(14). Elizabeth’s brother, Thornton Gray (1802-1850) had settled in Jefferson County, Kentucky, where he appears on the 1830 Censes. By 1843, Thornton moved to McCracken County, where he married Elizabeth Ann Russell (1829-1917)(15). Levi and Elizabeth’s first four children were born in Madison County, Tennessee but in 1834, the family made a sojourn into Kentucky, where Joseph Martin Spence was born in Graves County. From there, the family moved to McCracken County, Kentucky, where Elizabeth’s brother, Thornton, lived. Then in 1840, Levi and his family moved to Weakley County, Tennessee, where they appear on the Census that year. The youngest son Littleton was born in Weakley County in 1843. In 1840, Elizabeth Gray Spence’s younger brother, Charles Porter Gray (1819-1890) was living in Williamson County, Tennessee, where he appears as married with a young son and daughter under the age of five(16). This would have been his first family; I do not know their names, and I do not believe they survived. Levi James Spence moved to Weakley County because a younger brother (William) had settled there. He and his family had returned to North Carolina, and then moved back to Tennessee.

Levi James Spence died in Weakley County, Tennessee in 1843. His wife, Elizabeth Gray, returned to McCracken County, Kentucky shortly after his death. She appears on the 1850 Census with her children: James (age 24); William W. (age 18); Joseph M. (age 15); Elizabeth F. (age 13); Thomas J. (age 11); Littleton F. (age 7)(17). She appears on the 1880 Census for Woodville, McCracken, Kentucky, and she lived there the last three years of her life(18). She died November 28, 1883, and she is buried in the New Liberty Cemetery, Woodville, McCracken County, Tennessee(19).

To Be Continued in Part Six

References

(1) Alexander Gray in Scotland Select Marriages, 1561-1910 about Alexander Gray. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Alexander Gray in Scotland Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1960. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) One World Ancestral Trees, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) Alexander Gray in the UK Extracted Probate Records, 1269-1975. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Griffen Gray and Thornton Gray on the Militia Roster for 1775, Pasquotank County, North Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) North Carolina Will Abstract for Thornton Gray (1776), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7)Julian Gray/Samuel Spence Marriage Record, North Carolina Marriage Records, 1741-2011. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8)Samuel Spence Last Will & Testament (1805), Microfilmed opy obtained from the North Carolina State Library and Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.
(9)1830 Census about Thornton Gray, New Hanover, Pasquotank, North Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10)1850 Census about Thornton Gray (b. 1802), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11)1860 Census about Charles Porter Gray, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12)North Carolina Will Abstract for Thornton Gray (1776), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14)1830 Census for Levi Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15)1830 Census for Thornton Gray, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16)1840 Census for Charles P. Gray, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17)1850 Census for Elizabeth Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18)1880 Census for Elizabeth Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) Elizabeth Spence Find-a-Grave Memorial #117184444, Find-a-Grave.com Website. Date Accessed: 17 June 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Four: Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859) and Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872)

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Samuel Perry Spence was born in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1800. He was named Samuel for Samuel Inman and Perry for his paternal grandmother, Judha Perry Spence Jones, Elisha’s mother. The 1800 Census for Greenville County, South Carolina indicates a family similar to Elisha’s in the John Spencer Household(1). However, the young family had already been making plans to relocate to Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, where Elisha Spence also appears in 1800(2). [Note: Thomas J. Spencer would die in Greenville in 1810. That same year, Levi Spencer relocated to Sevier County, Tennessee. A woman Caroline Toney Spencer’s age appears in his household in Tennessee. However, a woman of Caroline’s age appears in the Abraham Spencer household in Greenville County in 1810. And there is a possibility that Caroline may have returned to Virginia prior to relocating to Georgia with Levi.] The year following their move to Mecklenburg County, a second child was born to Elisha and Susannah. Levi James Spence was born in Mecklenburg County in 1801. He was named for Susannah’s brother, Levi Spencer, and for Elisha’s favorite uncle, James Spence. After Susannah and Levi were able to travel, the Elisha Spence family moved to Randolph County, North Carolina, where the James Spence family still lived.

From a very early time, Samuel Perry Spence was surrounded with large groups of families and extended families in the area. After they settled in Randolph, Elisha was able to reconnect with the David and Daniel Jones families as well. By 1804, the Jones families departed for Davidson County, Tennessee–something the Spence and Spencer families would do by 1810. When the Spence family moved to Tennessee, they would reconnect with the Inman family and the Daniel Jones family. [As noted in a previous article, David Jones died before April 1806 in Davidson County, Tennessee(3).] John David Spencer, Susannah’s brother, settled in Stewart County, Tennessee, where he appears on the 1810 Census(4). By 1820, John Spencer relocated to Perry County, Tennessee, where he appears on the Census as living close to the Samuel Inman family(5). And by 1820, Samuel Perry Spence, his brother, Daniel Spence, and possibly Levi J. Spence, had moved to Perry County where they were living with their uncle. Some young men their ages appear in the John Spencer household that year.

On May 25, 1824, Samuel Spence married Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872)–the daughter of Samuel and Mary Williams Inman–in Davidson County, Tennessee(6). They were living in Perry County, Tennessee at the time and there is no return date on the marriage license. In all likelihood, they had to travel to Davidson County to get the license. The wedding was in Perry County, and no return date was filed. The story of Elizabeth’s Inman family is found in Part Three of this series, so I will not repeat it all here.

Samuel Perry Spence and Elizabeth Inman had the following children: [Note: I will introduce them here and detail some of them in a later article.]

A set of twins:
1. Susannah “Susan” Diane Spence (1825-1830). Susan was born July 31, 1825 in Perry County, Tennessee[7], and she died after the 1830 Census in Perry County, Tennessee.

2. Lazarus Spence (1825-1902). Lazarus was born July 31, 1825 in Perry County, Tennessee(8) and he died November 15, 1902 in Jasper County, Missouri(9). He was known as “Laz” Spence. On December 3, 1848, he married Adeline Elizabeth Bryant (1833-1931) in Jasper County, Missouri(10) [Note: The wedding license is December 3, 1848. The actual ceremony took place December 23, 1848]. She was the daughter of Daniel Bryant (1803-1858) and Lucy Key (1810-1903). They had no natural children but adopted two daughters: Marion Elizabeth Vermillion Spence (1858-1926) and Martha Jane Vermillion Spence (1860-1915)(11).
—-
Another set of twins:
3. William David Spence (1827-1907). [My second-great grandfather] William David was born October 27, 1827 in Perry County, Tennessee(12), and he died April 26, 1907(13) in Jasper County, Missouri. He was known as “Dave” Spence. On October 30, 1850, William David married Manerva Caroline Hood (1824-1901) in Jasper County, Missouri(14). She was the daughter of Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)(12). Their children were (a) John Newton Spence (1850-1930); (b) Thomas Jefferson Spence (1853-1911); (c) Salathiel Monroe Spence (1854-1921)–my great-grandfather; (d) Harriet V. Spence (1856-1906); (e) George Washington Spence (1858-1930); (f) William Joseph Spence (1861-1938); (g) Joel C. Spence (1863-1955); (h) Nancy Adeline “Nannie” Spence (1866-1948); (i) Elizabeth J. “Lizzie” Spence (1866-1952)

4. Samuel Elisha Spence (1827-1840). Samuel was born October 27, 1827 in Perry County, Tennessee(15), and he died after the 1840 Census in Jasper County, Missouri(16)
—-
5. Rebecca Jane Spence (1828-1859). Rebecca was born in 1828 in Perry County, Tennessee(17), and she died in 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri(18). On August 29, 1858, Rebecca married George Washington Triplett (1825-1909) in Jasper County, Missouri(19). He was the son of John Hore Triplett (1804-1882) and Mary Butler Bradley (1807-1875). They had no children, although Rebecca may have died in childbirth. George married Floraetta Piety Frye (1855-1931) in Pineville, McDonald County, Missouri on January 19, 1873. Their children were: (a) William Elzey Triplett (1874-1932); (b) Mary J. Triplett (1877-1880); (c) Alta Laura Triplett (1881-1979); (d) Anna Margaret Triplett (1888-1925); (e) Elmer Allen Triplett (1888-1925)

6. Milly Catherine Spence (1837-1896). Milly was born January 27, 1837 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died August 28, 1896 in Jane, McDonald County, Missouri(20). On July 26, 1855, Milly Catherine married James Henry Bunch (1834-1929) in Jasper County, Missouri(21). He was the son of Eli Bunch (1795-1872) and Nancy Bullington (1800-1852). Their children were: (a) Elvira F. Bunch (1856-1934); (b) Nancy Elizabeth Bunch (1858-1941); (c) Nimrod P. Bunch (b. 1864); (d) William Henry Bunch (1867-1880); (e) Sarah K. Bunch (1873-1880).

7. Newton Jasper Spence (1841-1882). Newton was born July 4, 1841 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died May 18, 1882 in Milburn, Johnson County, Oklahoma(22). His wife was Mary Jane Brooks (1850-1880), whom he married about 1868 in Oklahoma. She was the daughter of John and Martha Brooks. Their children were: (a) Newton Jacob Spence (1869-1954); (b) Alice Bell Spence (1871-1913); (c) Mary Jane Spence (1873-1959); (d) John Jasper Spence (1875-1954); (e) Martha Elizabeth “Daisy” Spence (1877-1934); (f) James Louis Spence (1878-1934).

8. Sarah Elizabeth Spence (1843-1912). Sarah was born January 1, 1843 in Jasper County, Missouri(23), and she died July 3, 1912 in Vernon, Wilbarger, Texas(24). She was married to John Hull (1844-1908) in Grayson County, Texas. He was the son of John Hull (1798-1858) and Sarah St. Clair. Their children were: (a) Sophia Hull (1870-1953); (b) Millicent Catherine Hull (1872-1953); (c) Belle Hull (b. 1877); (d) Connie Hull (b. 1884); (e) Mary Hull; (f) Mable Hull; (g) Lizzie Hull; (h) Johnnie Hull.

9. Louis (Lewis) Wesley Spence (1844-1890). Louis was born December 10, 1844 in Jasper County, Missouri(25), and he died May 16, 1890 in Prairie Grove Twp., Washington County, Arkansas. On March 31, 1875, he married Amanda Miranda “Mandy” Taylor (1855-1921) in Washington County, Arkansas(26). They had two children: (1) Annie M. Spence (1876-1894); and (2) Samuel Lee Spence (b. 1877).

Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence remained in Perry County, Tennessee until 1836 or 1837. His sister, Milly Catherine, and his brother, Daniel, preceded him in relocating to Jasper County, Missouri. The oldest son of Elisha and Susanna, Samuel probably waited behind to settle his father’s affairs. And then his family headed west to Missouri, where they joined the others, leaving Tennessee behind.

To Be Continued In Part Five

References

(1) 1800 Census for John Spencer, Greenville County, South Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 15 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) 1800 Census for Elisha Spence, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. National Archives Census Film. Accessed at the Denver Public Library, Denver, Colorado.
(3) David Jones Estate Inventory, April 1806. Roll 427, Book 3 (1805-1816), Davidson County, Tennessee Probate Records. Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.
(4) John David Spencer, 1810 Census for Stewart County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) John Spencer, 1820 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Tennessee Marriages to 1825 about Samuel Spence and Elizabeth Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Family Data Collection, Births, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8),(9),(10),(11) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index about Lazarus Spence, Maintained by: Margaret Pickett, Originally Created by: Linda Record added: Jan 23, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 33162562. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(12),(13) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index about William David Spence, Created by: Dr. Barbara Inman Beall
Record added: Mar 03, 2010 Find A Grave Memorial# 49050430. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(14) Jasper County, Missouri Marriage Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) 1830 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) 1840 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17) 1850 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18) 1860 Census for George Triplett, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index about Milly Catherine Spence Bunch, Created by: Dr. Barbara Inman Beall, Record added: Jul 29, 2005, Find A Grave Memorial# 11444497. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(21) Missouri Marriage Records, 1805, 2002, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(22) Family Data Collection, Individual Records about Newton Jasper Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(23) 1850 Census about Sarah E. Spence, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(24) Find-a-Grave Index about Sarah E. Hull, Created by: Rita Osborne,Record added: Jun 07, 2014,
Find A Grave Memorial# 131016388. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(25) 1850 Census about Lewis Spence, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(26) Arkansas Marriage Records (1820-1949), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 10 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Three: The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family

inman_coa

The only daughter of John Spencer and Caroline Toney, Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer was born in Goochland County, Virginia in 1785. About 1788 or 1789, her family moved to Greenville County, South Carolina, where her father owned property. She was between ten and twelve years of age when Elisha Spence arrived on the scene with the David Jones family. In all likelihood they met at church. And the possibility also exists the newcomers were invited to the Spencer home for dinner. What is apparent is that Elisha’s early friends in the area were Susie’s brothers–particularly Levi and John David, who were closer to his age. What is also apparent is that Elisha made a definite impression on the young Susanna. He probably realized it at first and was more amused about it than anything else. After all, she was “just a little girl!” Susie viewed herself in different terms. She once announced to her mother, “I’m going to marry him!” Her mother laughed and said, “Well, you’re a little young to be thinking about that.”

But Susie did think about it and made her presence known whenever possible, most of her presences involving some sort of mischief. Some of her pranks resulted in a dip in the creek. To Elisha, Susie was a “little girl” who could sometimes behave like a “little pest!”

Then Elisha met someone who visited Greenville County from time to time. His name was Samuel Inman, and he lived in Burke County, North Carolina. Samuel’s daughter Elizabeth would later marry Elisha’s son, Samuel. But in the mid-1790s, Elisha Spence and Samuel Inman were friends. Elisha was often invited to spend time with the Inmans in Burke County, something that annoyed Susie. She worried that Elisha would move to Burke County and that she would never see him again. But she was more annoyed over discussions relating to Tennessee and future plans to move there. The David Jones family definitely planned to move there. The Samuel Inman family also talked about going. And Elisha’s interest greatly increased whenever the subject came up. Susie had no idea where Tennessee was located, but she was certain it was some distance from Greenville County. Tennessee frightened her more than Burke County, especially when her own brothers–particularly John David–talked about moving there as well. No journals exist, nor do other writings that depict their early relationship. The following is a fictionalized account of what could have happened.

One day, John Spencer went to Charleston on business. He promised to take Susie with him, and he also invited Elisha to go along. Elisha recalled stories about his father’s experiences in Charleston, so he definitely wanted to see it. John took them down to the harbor and showed them where the prison ships were located. Elisha stared across the water, imagining the ships and his father aboard one of them.

“Lisha–was your father out there?” Susie asked.

“Yes, he was. He was a prisoner on one of those ships.”

“Were they mean to him?”

“Yes, they were!”

“Did they let him go?”

“Finally,” Elisha told her. “He went home to die.”

“Oh!”

Susie slipped her hand into Elisha’s. They were quiet for a while. Presently, they walked away.

It was an event Elisha would remember the rest of his life. Susie remembered it as well.

The Samuel Inman family left Burke County, North Carolina for Davidson County, Tennessee in 1798 with other family members! The David Jones family announced their plans to follow suit in two years.

“I think I might go with them!” she heard Elisha tell her brothers.

The door banged loudly, causing Elisha to turn.

“Was that Susie?” he asked.

“Guess it was!” John David smiled.

“Is something wrong?”

“Guess so!”

“Well, what?”

“You’re the one who said you’re thinkin’ of movin’ to Tennessee!”

Susie stomped across the yard and leaned against a tree. Angry tears filled her eyes. Momentarily she realized someone stood behind her.

“Susie–“

My fourth great-grandparents married in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1799 after Susie turned fifteen. Their son, Samuel Perry Spence–my third great grandmother–was born in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1800. He would marry my third great-grandmother, Elizabeth Inman–Samuel Inman’s daughter–in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1824. Some people believe her full name was Rebecca Elizabeth Inman. That may be true since her oldest daughter’s name was Rebecca. But I have just seen the name Elizabeth on records.

The Inman Family

[The following is a revision of an article written on this blog–“Looking for Elizabeth–Parking in the Southern Inman Family”–dated August 1, 2014.]

In the early 1990s when I first became engaged in genealogy, I discovered that my third great-grandmother’s name was Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872). She became the wife of my third great-grandfather, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859); they were married May 10, 1824 in Davidson County, Tennessee. While I experienced major breakthroughs on the Spence line in those early days, the southern Inmans left me puzzled. Fortunately and perhaps, unfortunately, my search took me deep into the wilderness. An article titled “The INMAN Family History—America”, discovered on microfilm through the local Family History Center, started me on my journey. The key source used in the article was an earlier piece titled “Nidderdale and the Garden of the Nidd.” When I examined my find, I thought I had died and entered the Gates of Heaven!

Well—no—I didn’t die, and I certainly hadn’t entered the Pearly Gates! But the article introduced me to Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego Inman and to the Daniel Boone story!

According to “The INMAN Family History”—

…”Prior to the Revolutionary, War, 1765, three brothers left their home in England, tradition said on account of a step-mother, and came to America, settling in Virginia, then to North Carolina, afterward to Tennessee…Being accustomed to the luxuries of an English home, it must have required much courage to come to a wilderness where their lives hung by a thread…These three brave souls knew no fear, and upon their arrival became Americans, and in the dark struggle which followed, fought, and one gave up his life for his country.

It is of SHADRACH, MESHACH, and ABEDNEGO INMAN of whom we speak, being sons of John Inman and Henrietta Hardin. John Inman is believed to have followed his sons to this country in 1771. There is no record of other siblings, though the great ocean may have separated them from loved ones in their English home.

We first hear of these brothers in history as starting from North Carolina about 1767 with a party of hunters led by Daniel Boone, on their way to explore the country west of the Cumberland Mountains. One night, after having travelled for days in the snow without food, they were surprised and attacked by the Indians, while asleep, in Middle Tennessee—then a wilderness—near a cave, presumably what is now known as the famous Nicka-jack Cave; nearly all were killed, among them Meshach Inman. Shadrach and Abednego survived, but Shadrach was wounded in the side by a spear. This weapon is still in the possession of his descendants. Abednego was wounded in the forehead by a tomahawk which scar he carried the rest of his life. He hid in a hollow tree where he lived nine days without food…'(1)

I would hate to recount the number of hours I spent in trying to park Elizabeth into one of those families. My three huge southern Inman notebooks bear witness to my struggle. And my discovery of Elizabeth’s father—Samuel Inman (1773-1830)—was purely accidental. I was searching the 1820 Perry County, Tennessee Census for Elizabeth’s husband Samuel Spence when lo and behold—Samuel Inman resided in the same area! Since Samuel Spence married Elizabeth Inman, chances were excellent Samuel Inman was Elizabeth’s father. But another question arose: Who was Samuel Inman?

Ever try to find an empty parking space in a busy mall? My quest for Samuel Inman was like that: I could not find a place to park! A trip to Dandridge, Tennessee didn’t answer my questions. Howard and I visited the Revolutionary Cemetery in town and the courthouse. And I could not find my Samuel in any of the Three-Brother Families.

At first, I thought he belonged to Shadrach.
He didn’t!
Next, I tried Abednego.
No luck!
Finally, I resorted to Meshach.
That led me to a dead end as well.

Gradually, I dismissed the idea that I was directly descended from one of the three brothers!

“So, maybe they were uncles!” I decided.

And if that were the case—who were their brothers?

I could go on forever describing my fender bender demolition derby parking attempts. In addition to the three-brother problem, I was also confronted with the identity of their grandfather. “The INMAN Family History” sent me down the wrong way on a one-way street:

“The family of INMAN, Ionman or Ingman, variously spelled, derived from John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and are therefore descendants of Edward III of England. This family being strong adherents of the House of Lancaster raised a troop in the Royal cause under the Duke of Newcastle, and were at the fatal battle of Marston Moor, where several of the brothers were slain, the rest dispersed and the property confiscated by Cromwell’s party, 1650-1652. Their Coat of Arms is strongly Lancastrian and may have been granted them during the “War of the Roses.

The INMAN family was settled (for five successive generations) at Bowthwaite Grange Netherdale (or Nithisdale) in Old English) County of York, and intermarried with many of the principal families of that period…. In the Civil Wars in England this Robert Inman or “Bold Robin” sided with Parliament against the King, also his son, Michael Inman or Bold Robin, then a youth of eighteen years….”(2)

Ah, an empty parking spot—right?

Wrong–not that I didn’t attempt many times to park Samuel and daughter Elizabeth there!

A descendant of either Michael or of Christopher Inman informed me long ago this wasn’t true, so I disconnected my connection to them. Then I discovered a number of people focused on Robert Inman (1653-1701) of Surry County, Virginia. That connection did not go anywhere either since I could not find solid evidence to support it! In an article titled “The Inman Family of Surry and Sussex Counties, Virginia and Some of their Kin”, Joseph Francis Inman notes:

…A limited amount of research in printed sources from England did not reveal any definite connection with the Inman family of Surry County, Virginia, from which Sussex County was taken in 1754. There were some bearing the name Inman who came to Virginia, probably from England, early in the colonial period as well as some who came much later, but who have not been proven to be relatives of the family in Surrey [sic] County…

Robert Inman is the earliest proven ancestor of the Surry family. He may have been born in Virginia but evidence to that effect has not been found…He is first mentioned in the Surry county records when he was on the tithable list for 1683. He is shown to have been in the Colonial Militia in 1687….

Robert Inman made his will on the 6th day, first month [March] 1698/9 and it was ordered recorded on 3 March 1701/2. The will named his wife Mary, daughter Sarah, and sons Robert and John…(3)

[Note: Despite attempts to link this John with Ezekiel John Inman of this narrative, there is no direct connection between the Surry/Essex, Virginia Inmans and Elizabeth Inman’s family. That does not mean a collateral connection does not exist between the two family groups. To date, the connection has not been found!]

In the late 1990s, I suspended my work on genealogy because a dissertation consumed my time. After the dissertation was behind me, I resumed my family history once again—only to be forced to drop it. My teaching load became too intense. So I waited until retirement before trying it again. 2009 granted me that freedom. When I began charting the Inman-Spence line, I was in for a great surprise!

Talk about a headache! My eyeballs twirled in circles when I discovered what people had done to the southern Inmans over the years. The truth is—there were a number of Inman families in the South. During my years of absence, people had connected all of them in some form or fashion. Hoping to reconnect Elizabeth and Samuel’s lineage somewhere, I realigned them with Meshach. (They didn’t fit there, but I had to do something to get moving). Then I pursued Meshach’s father, who was now known as Ezekiel John Inman. Because I didn’t know what to do next—I reconnected Ezekiel John with Robert of Surry County, Virginia, which was wrong. And I stopped work on the Inman line once again. Another branch on my tree beckoned my interest—a book I dreamed of writing for years. So I forgot all about the Inmans and focused on the Clays, deciding to return to the Inmans later and straighten out the mess!

Three books later, I am now refocusing on the Inmans. One thing I learned during the writing of the three books: it is always best to begin with the basics of what I know and of what I can prove and discard all the rest. I could not prove anything beyond Samuel. But I remembered a document someone sent me years ago concerning a Hezekiah Inman. My rediscovery of that document put me in the right direction. Hezekiah’s wife would create the empty parking space, and Henry Inman’s wife would park the car. I discovered Henry through an online source—a family history called The Descendants of Henry Inman.

Henry Inman?

I had never seen Henry Inman in connection with Ezekiel and the Three Brothers. According to the file, a Henry Inman was the father of Ezekiel John Inman.(4) I began searching for Henry Inman and while a few candidates appeared in early Virginia, I noticed two strong candidates who resided in Maryland—both about the same age and both with the same first name: Henry. This discovery reminded me of an early suggestion that Ezekiel John was born in Maryland—possibly in Frederick County. And since I found two Henrys of particular interest in Anne Arundel and Prince Georges Counties, I decided there had to be a connection. After studying the Hezekiah information, I noticed that he had a son named Henry and that Hezekiah was thought to be born in Frederick County. One thing led to another and soon the pieces fell into place!

The Inmans of Cumberland, England

The story of the Cumberland, England Inmans actually begins in Yorkshire with a John Inman, who was born in Yorkshire in 1620 and who died in Cumberland, England.(5) He was christened in Sedbergh, Yorkshire, England February 7, 1620. John was the son of another John Inman. His wife is unknown, but two of his sons are of importance here: John Inman, who was born in 1649, and Henry Inman, who was born in 1650. Henry (1650) was reportedly transported to Virginia, per the following:

•ID: I18750
Name: Henry INMAN
Reference Number: 18771
Sex: M
Birth: ABT 1650 in England
Occupation: transported to Virginia or Maryland
Note:
Possible progenitor Henry Inman transported possibly to Virginia 1668. Possibly father or grandfather of Henry Inman born about 1690, of Anne Arundel County, Maryland who married Hannah Pinkstone in Maryland about 1712.

The Complete Book of Emigrants, 1607-1776
12 November 1668. Newgate prisoners reprieved to be transported to Barbados [but may have gone to Virginia – see petition of Emanuel Jones of May 1673]. London: Henry Inman;

(complete list: Henry Griffin; Richard Crispe; John Lively; William Field; Henry Inman; Elizabeth Burton, widow; Margaret Griffiths, spinster; Jane Rogers, widow; Mary Edwards alias Symmes, widow. Middlesex: Francis Oakley of Bromley; Elizabeth Betts of St. Giles in the Fields, spinster, [order made in May 1669 for custody of her bastard child delivered in Newgate]; Mary Standley of St. Giles Cripplegate, spinster; Susan Partridge of St. Paul Covent Garden, spinster; Martha Goodman, wife of Edward Goodman of St. Andrew Holborn; Margaret Tattle of St. Giles in the Fields; Mary Jones of St. Paul Covent Garden, spinster; Rose Whitehead of St. Martin in the Fields, spinster; John Cooke of Ruislip; Thomas Draper of St. Giles in the Fields; Isaac Johnson of Stepney; John Eades of Northwood; Emanuel Jones of St. Martin in the Fields; Richard Morgan of St. Giles Cripplegate; James Welling of St. Giles in the Fields; David Sirvin of St. Giles in the Fields. (EB & PRO: C66/3102/3).

13 November 1668. The following apprenticed in Bristol: Nathaniell Lewis to Thomas Pope, 4 years Virginia; Thomas Hill to John Soller, 4 years Virginia. (BR).)
UID: DB77A0F5C5764407B72FEC331B903561B37E
Change Date: 27 JUN 2012

Father: INMAN b: ABT 1620

Marriage1 Spouse Unknown Children
Henry INMAN b: ABT 1691 in Anne Arundel Co, Maryland
Henry Inman (1691) would marry Hannah Pinkstone (born 1693) in Anne Arundel County. Their children follow:
• Violetta Inman (b. 1713)
• William Inman (b. 1715)
• Henry Inman (1718-1719)
• Pinkston Inman (b. 1721)
• Ann Inman (b. 1723) (6)

This branch of the Inman family is collaterally connected with Elizabeth’s ancestors. Her direct connection is with the brother of Henry Inman (1650)—John Inman (born 1649).

Elizabeth’s Line

My seventh great grandfather, John Inman, was christened June 14, 1649 in Burnsall, Yorkshire, England and is registered as a son of John Inman.(7) He relocated to Cumberland, England and settled there. The name of his wife is unknown; however, they had a number of children:
Henry Inman (1689-1730)—my sixth great grandfather. He will be discussed shortly.
• Jane Inman, who was christened October 7, 1692, Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England(8)
• Thomas Inman, who was christened May 3, 1694, Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England(9)
• Mary Inman, who was christened February 14, 1695, Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England)10)
• John Inman, who was christened October 6, 1699, Saint Nicholas, Whitehaven, Cumberland, England.(11)

Henry Inman (1689-1730).(12)(13) On October 25, 1689, Henry Inman was christened in Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England—the son of John Inman. Henry appears to have been a mariner, requiring him to travel back and forth across the Atlantic. He arrived in New York in 1711, but it is unknown how long he stayed there.14) At some point, he traveled to Maryland since his cousin Henry (1691) was living in Anne Arundel County. And while in Anne Arundel County, Henry (1689) met and married Susannah Ann Hyatt (1698-1750). She was the daughter of Charles Hyatt (1672-1726) and Sarah Tewkesbury (1672-1726). The children of Charles Hyatt and Sarah Tewkesbury were:
• Seth Hyatt (1694-1750)—he will return momentarily
• Susannah Hyatt (1697-1698)
Susannah “Ann” Hyatt (1698-1750)—She would become Henry Inman’s wife. Susannah was born November 30, 1698 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and she was christened October 15, 1699 in St. James Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland.(15)
• Christopher Hyatt, born 1699
• Ann Hyatt (1706-1729)
• Asa Hyatt, born 1706)
• Peter Hyatt (1707-1800)
• Uriah Hyatt, born 1711
• Elizabeth Hyatt, born 1714
• Penelope Hyatt, born 1716
• William E. (Ezekiel) Hyatt Sr. (1717-1794).(16)

Henry Inman (1689) became an associate of the Hyatt family, who removed from Anne Arundel to Prince Georges County , and later settled in Frederick County, Maryland . The town of Hyattsville in Prince Georges County was named after them. One of Susannah’s brothers, Seth Hyatt (1694-1750), becomes important here.

Seth married Alice Davis (1696-1724) in Anne Arundel County. Please note the names of their children:

• Seth Hyatt, Jr. (1718-1769)
• Avarilla Hyatt (1719-1814)
• Neomi Hyatt, b. 1719
• Shadrack Hyatt (1720-1761)
• Meshach Hyatt (1723-1807)
• Abednego Hyatt (1724-1779)(17)

SHADRACH! MESHACH! ABEDNEGO!

The following is from my own family tree after discovering all of this.

Henry Inman (1689-1730) and Susannah Hyatt (1698-1750) married about 1726 and had two sons:

• Ezekiel John Inman (1727-1791)—“Ezekiel” for William Ezekiel Hyatt—Susannah’s brother—and “John” for Henry’s father—John Inman. Ezekiel John Inman was born in Prince Georges, Maryland (Frederick County, today) about 1727, and he died about May 1793 in Burke County, North Carolina. He was the Constable of Linville District in Burke County, North Carolina in 1773, having appeared of record there as early as 1771.(18) He is buried with Henrietta in Lexington, Rockbridge, Virginia. Ezekiel married Hannah Henrietta Hardin (1726-1752), and they had the following children:

o Elisha Inman (sometimes shown as Benjamin Elisha Inman)—“Benjamin” for Hannah’s father (1746-1815) and “Elisha” for one of the Hyatts I am currently investigating.
o Shadrach Hardin Inman, Sr. (1747-1830)—named for Susannah’s brother
o Meshach Inman (1749-1767/71)—named for Susannah’s brother
o Susannah Inman (1750-1816)—named for Susannah
o Abednego Hardin Inman (1752-1831)—named for Susannah’s brother.(19)

Ezekiel’s second wife was Fanny Wakefield (1727-1798). Their children were:

o Lazarus Inman (1755-1781)
o William Wakefield Inman Sr. (1758-1803).(20)

[Note: Instead of being direct ancestors as I originally thought, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego Inman are my first cousins six times removed! While earlier sources claim they were born in England, they were born in America. Abednego’s name is the only one actually appearing on a ship passenger list. Wealthier men sent their sons to England for their education at this time, which would explain Abednego’s name on the passenger list.(21)]

Hezekiah Inman (1728/30-1778)—“Hezekiah” was a Hyatt name, although it appears among the Inmans in the Northeast. (There was a Hezekiah Hyatt (1745-1788) who may have been named for Hezekiah Inman, but I don’t know that much about him. He came from Maryland where the Hyatts lived, so that is an excellent sign. Supposedly, his father was Elisha Hyatt (b. 1720)—and I am investigating him as well. I mentioned Elisha above). Hezekiah Inman is my fifth great grandfather. The rest of this narrative will be devoted to him.

Hezekiah Inman was born between 1728 and 1730 in Prince Georges, Maryland (Frederick County, today), and he died before October 24, 1778 in Burke County, North Carolina. Henry Inman (1689), the father of Ezekiel and Hezekiah, apparently returned to England about 1730, which he would have done had he been a mariner or had he been involved with shipping in some manner.(22) Henry died in England and was buried there January 28, 1730. His widow Susannah and her two sons moved in with her brother, Seth Hyatt, and the boys became close with their cousins Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego Hyatt! Ezekiel would later name his sons after them.

After their mother’s death in 1750, Hezekiah and Ezekiel left Maryland. Hezekiah wandered down to Augusta County, Virginia, while Ezekiel appears to have gone to Albemarle. In his “Early Inmans of the South,” Randy McConnell notes:

Ezekiel who first appears in confirmed data as an officer in British regular forces between 1754 and 1763 in the French and Indian War, apparently drawn from Albemarle Co., VA. A notation indicates that he owned taxable property in Augusta Co. in 1755, but he was not found when taxes were collected.(5) Ezekiel married Hannah or Henrietta Hardin, probably in Frederick Co., VA c. 1740 and remarried to Fanny Wakefield of Albemarle Co. before they moved to Burke Co., NC. He was still living there in 1793, over age 60. Widow Fanny later moved to Blount Co., TN. Because of his three Biblically named sons (Shadrach, Meshack and Abednego), their alleged exploration with Daniel Boone in 1767, and a enormous brood of descendants, Ezekiel’s line has been heavily documented compared to the others.

– Hezekiah, who is mentioned in the estate records of Michael Reilley from 1754 to 1757 in Augusta Co., VA. Hezekiah later moved to Albemarle Co. and probably died in Burke Co., NC. He married a Hiatt/Hyatt and had four sons.(23)

About 1760, Hezekiah returned to Prince George’s County, where he married Mary Jane Hyatt (1740-1793). She was the daughter of Shadrach Hyatt (1720-1761) and Dinah Gaither (1721-1761). (Mary Jane would be known by her second name—Jane Hyatt.) As noted by Randy McConnell, they had four sons:
• Hezekiah Inman (1770-1847)—named for his father. Hezekiah was born about 1770 in Onslow, North Carolina, and he died before September 1847 in Marshall, Mississippi. He married Christiana/Christina (Hyatt?) in 1793 in Burke County, North Carolina. Their children were:
o Anthony Inman (1796-1865)
o Hezekiah Inman, born 1801
o Hannah Inman (1803-1876)
o An Unknown Male Inman, born 1803
o Abraham Inman (1805-1884).(24)

Hezekiah and Christiana divorced between 1814 and 1817 in Williamson County, Tennessee.(25) On August 3, 1824, he married Eliza A. Branch (1803-1897) in Williamson County, Tennessee.(26) They had two children:

o Elizabeth Inman (1826-1853)
o Joseph M. Inman (born 1829)

By 1830, Hezekiah and his wife were in Wayne County, Tennessee,(27) and they relocated to Marshall, Mississippi by 1840(28). Hezekiah died in Marshall, Mississippi in 1847.

• Hyatt Inman, who was born in 1771 in Burke County, North Carolina. He may have died young; I could find no further records about him. He was named for his mother. I believe that Hyatt and Henry were twins.(29)
• Henry Inman (1771-1788). Henry was born in 1771 in Burke County, North Carolina, and he died after 1800 in Burke County, North Carolina.(30) He was named for his grandfather. He was married and had several children, but I do not know any of their names.
Samuel Inman (1773-1830)—my fourth great grandfather. Samuel Inman was born in Burke County, North Carolina in 1773, and he died after the 1820 Census and before the 1830 Census in Perry County, Tennessee.(31) He was named for Samuel Inman (1767-1804)—Meshach Inman’s son. About 1789, Samuel married Mary Williams (1774-1808) in Burke County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of Ambrose Hiram Williams (1730-1795) and Mary Moor (1738-1790). Their children were:

1. Lazarus Inman (1789-aft 1790)
2. Ezekiel Inman (1790-aft 1850) m. Charity (b. 1790). Their children: (a) John Inman (1822-1860); (b) Mary Inman (b. 1828); (c) Rebecca Inman (b. 1850)
3. Abraham (Abe) Inman (1798-1870) m. Sarah Armstrong (b. 1798). Their children: (a) Calvin C. Inman (1829-1910); (b) Nancy Caroline Inman (1830-1885); (c) Martha Inman (b. 1832); (d) David Samuel Spencer “Spence” Inman (1834-1866)
4. Elisha Inman (1805-1870) m. Unknown. Child: Daniel C. Inman (b. 1848). m 2. Sarah Ann Hobbs (1816-1870). Their child: Elizabeth E. Inman (b. 1855).
5. Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872)—my third great grandmother. [Note: Some people believe her full name was Rebecca Elizabeth Inman–a possibility, but I have no record with that name.] Elizabeth was born in 1808 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died July 16, 1872 in Marrs Hill Twp., Washington County, Arkansas.(32) Elizabeth married my third great grandfather, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859) in Davidson County, Tennessee on May 10, 1824. Their children will appear in Part Four.

Hezekiah Inman died October 24, 1778 in Burke County, North Carolina. He is referenced in Burke County “…as neighbor in Deed to Phillip Burns; survey says ‘next to widow Inman’.(33) His wife remarried in 1790, and her second husband was Ambrose Hiram Williams (1730-1795)—the father of Mary Williams (1774-1808), who married Hezekiah and Jane Hyatt Inman’s son, Samuel Inman (1773-1820). (34) Samuel and Mary Williams Inman became the parents of Elizabeth Inman Spence (1808-1872). Ambrose William’s wife, Mary Moor, died in 1790.

Ambrose Williams and Jane Hyatt Inman had two or three children, but their names are unknown. By 1793, they lived in Gowensville, South Carolina, where Jane died that year. Ambrose died in Gowensville in 1795.

Concerning Ambrose Williams:

Born c. 1730 in Newport, Pembroke, Wales. “Ambrose Williams, was a Welshman. He was a millwright by trade but engaged in farming toward the latter part of his life. He possessed a large property, but was broken up by the depreciation of continental money. He was a Revolutionary War Patriot. He was twice married. His first wife was Mary Moor. They lived in North Carolina before and during the Revolutionary War and had several sons old enough to serve in the war (from 19 Apr 1775 to 4 Jul 1776)*. After the death of Mary Moor he married Jane Inman. He had several children by his second marriage but their names are not available.” *The Revolutionary War actually lasted from April 19, 1775 to September 3, 1783 upon the signing of the Treaty of Paris. Cornwallis surrendered the British troops at Yorktown, Virginia on October 19, 1781.(35)

***

Since writing the Inman portion of this article August 1, 2014, I have received DNA matches on the Spence, Spencer, Toney, Inman, Hyatt, Williams and Moor lines, so I am satisfied that I’m finally heading in the right direction!

To Be Continued in Part Four

REFERENCES

(1)The INMAN Family History—America. (Author unknown); FHS Microfilm, Provo, Utah. Date obtained: ca Summer 1993.
The INMAN Family History—America, (author unknown); FHS Microfilm, Provo, Utah. Date obtained: ca Summer 1993.
(2)Inman, Joseph Francis, “The Inman Family of Surry and Sussex Counties, Virginia and Some of Their Kin,” (1975).
(3) “The Descendants of Henry Inman”, Geneology.com. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/i/n/m/Dawn-M-Inman/PDFGENE15.pdf
(4) Edmund West, comp., Family Data Collection – Marriages, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2001.
(5)England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about John Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Ladd, Reed, Cook, Engle, Hamilton, Lennon Ancestors, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, A Private Tree, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about Jane Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about Thomas Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) England, Select Births and Christenings 1538-1975 about Mary Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11)England, Select Births and Christenings 1538-1975 about John Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12)England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about Henry Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(13)”England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JQ5H-958 : accessed 01 Aug 2014), Henry Inman, 25 Oct 1689; citing SAINT BEES,CUMBERLAND,ENGLAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 496432.https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JQ5H-958
(14)U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Henry Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15)Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Susannah Ann Hyatt, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16)Maryland Hyatt Christening Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18)Ezekial Inman, Constable of Linville River district 1773, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21)U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Abednego Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22)England, Select Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991 about Henry Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(23)Randy McConnell, “Early Inmans of the South,” (1994). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(24)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(25)Tennessee Divorce and Other Records, 1800-1965 about Hezekiah Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(26)Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Eliza Branch [Note: Hezekiah’s name is mistyped “Ezekiel”]. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(27)United States Federal Census for 1830 about Hezekiah Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(28)United States Federal Census for 1840 about Hezekiah Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(29)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(30)1800 Federal Census for Burke County, North Carolina—Henry Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(31)United States Federal Census for 1820 Concerning Samuel Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(32)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, A Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(33)Burke County, North Carolina Deed Book, referencing Philip Burns Deed, 1778.
(34)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(35)“Comment on Another Tree” by Cora Louesa Williams Duvall—added by jenuine1 27 Oct 2009. Ancestry.com, Provo Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Two: Off To South Carolina–The Spencer and Toney Families

Modern South Carolina County Map. Greenville County is on the northern border

Modern South Carolina County Map. Greenville County is on the northern border

David Jones, Jr. married in 1786 or 1787. His wife’s name is unknown, as are the names of his children. By 1790, he had a young son and daughter(1) and by 1800, he had a total of two sons and four daughters(2). As previously noted, David Jones, Sr. and Judah Perry Spence both died in 1795–Judah passing first and David following. After their deaths, David Jones, Jr. decided to re-establish himself in a new location, and his attention soon focused on South Carolina. Apparently, some family members who settled there had traveled to Gates for the elder David’s funeral. Their stories intrigued both David Jones and Elisha Spence, who was also eager for new surroundings. Plans were subsequently made and as soon as they were able, the David Jones family and Elisha Spence traveled to Greenville County. Shortly after their arrival, Elisha Spence met the John Spencer family.

The Spencers and Toneys of Greenville County

The son of William David Spencer (1706-1775) and Sarah Hill (1706-1755), John Spencer was born in South Carolina in 1750(3). John’s father William David was born in Wales. Apparently, he traveled back and forth between England and America before settling here. The following is a section from my earlier research concerning this Spencer family beginning with Generation 5 and continuing up through Generation 1:

Generation 5: William David Spencer (b. 1706, Wales; d. March 1775, South Carolina-Today, Laurens County) WILLIAM DAVID5 SPENCER (ALEXANDER4, ALEXANDER3, OLIVER2, OLIVER1) was born 1706 in Wales, and died March 1775 in South Carolina (what is now Laurens County). He married SARAH HILL November 20, 1722, daughter of CHARLES HILL and ELIZABETH HOOVELL. She was born Abt. 1709 in North Carolina, and died 1755 in South Carolina (what is now Laurens County). William David Spencer died without a will. While conducting my research in the late 1990s, I found the following notice: “Citation granted to John Spencer of 96 District to administer the Estate of William Spencer, late of 96 District, deceased, as son and next of kin. To be read in the nearest place of Worship and return Certified.” Dated: March 24, 1775. [Some records indicate that this William David Spencer died in 1794. I think those records are referring to one of his sons, who was born in 1740 and who bore the same name.] At the time of William, Sr.’s death, his son, John, was the only remaining son in the area. The children of William David Spencer and Sarah Hill are: 1. Joseph Charles Spencer, b. November 6, 1738, Wales; d. January 6, 1837, Poor Valley, Lee Co., Virginia. 2. William D. Spencer, b. abt. 1740; d. 1794 3. John Spencer, b. abt. 1750, Greenville Co., South Carolina; d. abt. 1801, Greenville Co., South Carolina.

Generation 4: Alexander Spencer (1671-1735/36) ALEXANDER4 SPENCER (ALEXANDER3, OLIVER2, OLIVER1) was born Abt. 1671 in Rose Ash, Devonshire, England, and died bet. 1735 – 1736. He married CATHERINE PARROT in St. Andrews Parish, Charleston, South Carolina, daughter of JOHN PARROT and ELIZABETH PARRIS. She was born Abt. 1680 in Barbados. Alexander was christened December 24, 1671 in Rose Ash, Devonshire England. The children of Alexander Spencer and Catherine Parrot are: 1. Joseph Spencer, b. abt. 1704; d. abt. 1730 2. William David Spencer, b. abt. 1706, Wales; d. March 1775 in what is now Laurens County, South, Carolina. 3. John Spencer, b. abt. 1710, South Carolina. 4. Catherine Spencer, b. abt. 1708, South Carolina; m. Edward Van Vellsen, August 17, 1721, St. Philip’s Parish.

Generation 3: Alexander Spencer (b. abt. 1646, England; d. after 1710) ALEXANDER3 SPENCER (OLIVER2, OLIVER1) was born Abt. 1646 in England, and died aft. 1710. He married ANNE WILLIAMSON, daughter of JOHN WILLIAMSON and UNKNOWN//. She was born in Aberdeen, Scotland. The following is from my 1999 research: Alexander remained in Devonshire, England for the most part, but he may have owned land, which he’d inherited, in Wales and Scotland. The lands he owned in Scotland were located near Aberdeen. It was during one visit to Scotland when he met and married Anne Williamson, daughter of John Williamson of Aberdeen. The Williamsons were Baptists. He also met another family in Aberdeen that would later unite with his descendants in South Carolina; the Duncans of Aberdeen. 1st record of Alexander in Scotland was in the 1690’s, along with his brother-in-law, Samuel Williamson, and other Williamson in-laws. By the Governor: authorize you whose names are underwritten to that Province which lies from Cape Fear (South Carolina), south and west, as directed by James Sheaphard, Executor of the estate of Henery Cleamons, late of this province, deceased, and appraise said estate to Office of Secretary, within 90 days after date hereof signed; Mr. John Mills, Edward Perry, Manly Williamson, William Russell, John Williamson, or any three of them. Dated: May 8, 1693 February 15, 1694 Samuel Williamson had one Warrant; for a quarter of a Towne Lott: which was formerly granted to Oliver Spencer, but now in the possession of said Williamson. Dated ye 15th of febr. 1694. Signed by Governor Blake. (land Indentured to Williamson) By the Governor: authorize those whose names are underwritten to go to such parts of Province, as directed by Mary Capters, Administrator of said estate (of Richard Capters, planter) and make inventory, of Office of Secretary, 90 days: We: William Rivers, James Witter, Benjamin Lamball, executors of estate of Thomas Greatbeach, late of Province, deceased. Samuel Williamson and Alexander Spencer, all of Berkley County; 27 Mar 1695 Deed book A-A, pg. 123, 25 Feb 1743/4, Release. Joseph Spencer, planter, to Joseph Rivers, cordwainer, for 50 Pounds currency, 7acres on James Island, Berkeley County, bounding NE on Thomas Dickson; S on dividing line; W on William Chapman; E on part same tract; which land formerly belonged to Alexander Spencer; was inherited by his son Alexander Spencer; then (owned) by his brother, said Joseph Spencer: Kezia (her mark) Coziah, wife of Joseph Spencer, freely surrenders her dower. Witnesses: Joseph Rivers, Robert Rivers, before Henry Gibbes, J.P. James Mickie, D.P.R. Deed book D-D, pg. 105, 10th and 11th Aug 1746, L&R, William Spencer Jr. house carpenter, to George Rivers Jr., son of Robert, planter, all of James Island, Berkeley County, for 960:10 Pounds currency, 113 acres (part of 150 acres) bounding E on Stephen Russell; S on the great Sound; W on Joseph Rivers; N on Thomas Dixon. Whereas William, Earl of Craven, Palatine and the Lords Propers, by grant dated 14 Apr 1710, signed by Edward Tynte, Robert Daniel, Robert Gibbs, Thomas Broughton, and Frances Turbeville, granted Edward Wesbury 400 acres, English measure, in Berkeley County, and whereas Wesbury died intestate and all his real estate descended to his heir-at-law, Thomas Westbury, and whereas he sold 150 acres (part of the 400 acres) to Alexander Spencer, at whose death it was inherited by his son Alexander Spencer, at whose death it descended to his brother Joseph Spencer, who bequeathed the 150 acres to his brother William Spencer Jr. now he sells part (113 acres) to George Rivers. Witnesses; Capt. Robert Rivers, Daniel Stent, William Rivers. Before Thomas Lamboll, J.P. John Beale, Register. Alexander Spencer emigrated to Charleston South Carolina from Scotland with a group of Baptists. His religion is identified as “Puritan.” The children of Alexander Spencer and Anne Williamson are: 1. Alexander Spencer, b. abt. 1671, Rosh Ash, Devonshire, England; d. bet. 1735-1736 2. Joseph Spencer; b. (unknown); d. 1746, James Island, St. Andrews Parish, South Carolina; m. Keziah Rivers, March 15,1 737/38; d. bef. 1746, South Carolina. 3. William Spencer, b. (unknown); d. 1751. 4. Elizabeth Spencer, b. (unknown).

Generation 2: Oliver Spencer (b. 1611, England) OLIVER2 SPENCER (OLIVER1) was born Abt. 1611 in Warwickshire, England. He married (1) UNKNOWN Abt. 1633 in England. She was born in England, and died Bef. 1640 in England. He married (2) ELIZABETH HEDGER September 27, 1640 in Enfield, St. Andrew, London, England. The following is from my older research (1999): The restoration left many English Puritans in a quandary concerning their fate, and Oliver may have decided to join his Spencer relatives in Massachusetts. However by the late 1660’s John Winthrop, Thomas Hooker and other early Puritan leaders and ministers were dead. The new generation of Puritans tended to focus on secular rather than on spiritual matters. As a result dissenting groups, such as the Quakers, appeared on the scene. Oliver Spencer may well have joined that persuasion. In 1663, a group of dissenters who were disgusted with Massachusetts politics in general, left the colony in order to develop a new colony in the Cape Fear area of Carolina (today North Carolina). The colony broke up and some returned to Boston, some to England, and the rest of them went to the West Indies. Since Oliver Spencer is presumed to have come from the Caribbean to South Carolina, he was probably a member of the latter group. William Sayle, a native of the Isle of Man, Independent Congregationalist and future governor of South Carolina had settled in Bermuda in the late 1630’s. Oliver Spencer and his first wife had one child named Oliver Spencer, who was born about 1634. His children by his second wife Elizabeth Hedger are: 1. Joseph Spencer, b. abt. 1641 2. William Spencer, b. 1644; m. Jane Woulfe, September 1, 1669, Exeter, Devonshire, England 3. Alexander Spencer, b. abt. 1646, England; d. aft. 1710.

Generation 1: Oliver Spencer (b. abt 1590, England) Little is known about Oliver Spencer other than the fact he was born about 1590 in Warwickshire, England. His known son, Oliver Spencer, was born about 1611 in England. Another son, Ricardus (Richard) was born in 1613. Both sons were christened in Warwick, St. Mary’s, Warwickshire, England. His wife’s name is not known(4)

[The 96 District South Carolina Spencers were Baptists and were associated with the early Baptists in Charleston and in other parts of the state. As already noted in the Alexander Spencer section, a group of Baptists from Scotland landed at Charleston in 1684(5). Ahimaaz Spencer (1721-1805), son of John Spencer (1694-1780) and his wife Mary (1694-1780), was a minister-missionary who traveled between various Baptist congregations throughout the country, and he was in Greenville County, South Carolina when the Spence, Jones, Spencer and Toney families were there. Ahimaaz was born in East Haddam, Connecticut, and he died in Alton, Madison County, Illinois. At this time, I do not know the exact connection between the Spencers of Greenville County, South Carolina and the Spencers of East Haddam, Connecticut/subsequently Spencertown, New York, but I definitely believe they were distant cousins–a connection that undoubtedly dates back to England. Ahimaaz pastored at the Turkey Creek Baptist Church, and I have traced the John Spencer family to that congregation.]

My article I cited above contains an extensive reference to John Spencer, the subject under discussion here. Since writing that, I have made additional discoveries that replaces some of that information. So I will only cite portions of it here. For a period of time, I thought that Milly Catherine Duncan, daughter of John Duncan, was John Spencer’s wife. Then I learned that didn’t happen, per the following:

The Duncans of Greenville County, South Carolina were Presbyterians and were members of the Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church, which was organized in 1752. The Spencers were Baptists and were members of the Turkey Creek Baptist Church. From my earlier research: Concerning Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church, from Old South Carolina Churches, 1941, by Hazel Crowson Sellers:

“The first settler in the historic Duncan’s Creek neighborhood was John Duncan, a Scotch-Irish pioneer from Pennsylvania. Finding the country to his liking, he induced two friends, Joseph Adair and Robert Long, and their families to join him. Both Long and Adair were later to become soldiers of the Revolution. The Reverend Hezekiah Balch commenced holding services at Duncan’s Creek in 1752. It was not, however, until 1763 that a church building was erected. The present structure erected in 1842 is the third. Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church is known as the “Mother Church” of the Presbyterians in this neighborhood. About 1758 there arose a quarrel between the adherents of ? and Watt’s versions of the Psalms which were sung at services, and a large portion of the congregation seceded to form a Baptist Church”(5).

Concerning Turkey Creek Baptist Church: Ahimaaz Spencer was a Baptist preacher. He is credited with three wives, but all of his children were by Mary Wetmore. His first two wives were Zippard Brainerd and Susannah Spencer, whose Spencer line is currently unknown. He left Massachusetts for New York; from there he traveled to Virginia, where he ministered for some time. Ahimaaz appears on the tax records for Charlotte County, VA in 1782. He next relocated to North Carolina, and then traveled to South Carolina. In her “South Carolina Baptists 1670-1805”, Leah Townsend, Ph.D. finds Ahimaaz Spencer in several documents: Turkey Creek CB July, Aug 1791. List of members dismissed from Turkey Creek: Thomas Jones; Ahimaas Spencer (p. 187). Turkey Creek received in July 1791, Ahimaas Spencer from a dissolved body at Spur Creek–a northern branch of Little River, which may have been the body mentioned in the association (p. 193). Ahimaaz Spencer ministered in South Carolina for a while, and then he relocated to Kentucky. Eventually, he settled in Illinois, where he died in 1831. Amasa Spencer left Kentucky and relocated to Jennings County, Indiana. James Spencer, Amasa’s son, remained in Pulaski County(6).

Duncan was a prominent name in the Greenville County area. The parents of John Spencer’s first wife have been suggested as John Duncan and Jean Henderson, but “Milly Catherine’s” name does not appear in a will contest in the John Duncan estate file in Edgefield Co., South Carolina. (John Duncan died in Edgefield County in 1809.) A copy of the will contest dated 1837 involving his estate establishes: “———-Catherine Dunkin wife of Isaac Farmer has not been heard of in some 20 years(7). The name CATHERINE appears in this file (her full name was Milly Catherine), but she was the wife of Isaac Farmer and not John Spencer. Given the information in the estate file, this John Duncan cannot be the father of John Spencer’s first wife(8).

The search for John Spencer’s wife has not been easy and after a number of dead ends, I finally found her! The following is a synopsis of his life:

When John Spencer was born in 1750 in South Carolina, his father, William, was 44 and his mother, Sarah, was 41. He married MILLY CATHERINE RODEN and they had three children together. [I found the names “Rhoda” and “Sarah” associated with her, but those proved false. His first wife’s name was Milly Catherine Roden! Milly Catherine Roden will return in Part Six of this series.] John then married Caroline Toney and they had two children together between 1785 and 1788. He died in 1801 in Greenville County, South Carolina, at the age of 51(9).

The children of John Spencer and Milly Catherine Roden follow:

l. Levi Spencer (1770-1844). Levi was born in Bradford County, Virginia, and he died after July 1, 1844 in Bartow, Cass, Georgia. Levi would go to Tennessee with Spencer, Spence relatives later, but he didn’t settle in Davidson County, although he appears there on 1811 tax lists. So he may have been there a short time. His wife was Susanna Susan Bolton (1779-1896). Their children were: (a) Levi Spencer (1800-1840); (b) Doctor Hampton Spencer (1812-1863); (c) Thomas J Spencer (1813-1864); (d) an unknown daughter (1820-1825). He appears on the 1800 Census for Greenville County, Tennessee(10). By 1810, Levi appears on the records of Sevier County, Tennessee(11) and by 1812, he was in Roane County, Tennessee, where his second son was born. After that, he relocated to McMinn County, Tennessee and remained there until 1827, when he appears on a Georgia Land Lottery(12). Levi relocated to Lee County, Georgia and put his sons in charge of properties he retained in McMinn, Tennessee and in Bradley County, Tennessee.
2. John David Spencer (1775-1820). John was born in 96 District, South Carolina in 1775, and he died in Perry County, Tennessee before the 1830 Census. He last appears on the 1820 Census for Perry County. His wife’s name is unknown, but they had one son–Levi Spencer (1800-1830).
3. Thomas J. Spencer (1784-1810). Thomas was born in 96 District (which became Greenville two years later), and he died in Greenville County in 1810. His mother, Sarah, died in childbirth.

Shortly after his wife’s death, John married Caroline Elizabeth Toney (1767-1830). This is the wife I’ve been looking for. A recent DNA match proved my connection with her! She is my fifth great-grandmother!

The Toney family is an old family with ties going back to the Plantaganets. As he did with his first marriage, John returned to Virginia to marry her. Since his brother, Joseph Charles Spencer, lived in Lee County, Virginia, John probably made many trips there, retaining his ties to that state. The daughter of Sherwood Toney (1738-1833) and Lorena England (1743-1810), Caroline was born June 7, 1767 in Goochland County, Virginia, and she died after 1830 in Lee County, Georgia. John Spencer and Caroline Toney were married about 1784 in Goochland County, Virginia. They had two children:

1.Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer (1785-1810)–my fourth great grandmother. Her story will unfold in Part Three.
2. Abraham Spencer (1788-1865). Abraham was born in 1788 in Goochland County, Virginia, and he died December 25, 1865 in Greenville County, South Carolina. Abraham’s wife was Sarah Goolsby (1790-1855). Their children were: (a) William Toney Spencer (1810-1876) [William was quite the person. He was born April 20, 1810 in Greenville County, South Carolina, and he died May 28, 1876 in Pickens County, South Carolina. His wife was Elizabeth Sammons (1812-1872). Their children were: Mary Jane Spencer (1830-1929), Elizabeth Spencer (1832-1903), John R. Spencer (1833-1930), William D. Spencer, born 1837, and Tench Carson Spencer, Sr. (1847-1915). He was known as “Colonel William Spencer” and by 1822, he was the wealthiest man in the town of Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina. In 1822, he purchased Lots 7 and 8 in Greenville from Thomas Crayton for $5,000.00 (which was a hefty sum back then). In 1824, he built the Mansion House in Greenville, which became a famous hotel. (b) Evaline Spencer (1820-1850)

John and Caroline Toney Spencer remained in Goochland, Virginia until 1789, although John may have traveled back and forth during that period of time. Then John moved his family to Greenville County, South Carolina, where they appear on the 1790 Census(13). John’s land was located between Turkey Creek and Savannah River (14).

John Spencer died in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1801. For years, researchers could not find Caroline Toney Spencer. They knew that she died in Georgia, but they did not know the details. I have my own theory.

As already noted, Levi Spencer (the oldest son of John Spencer and his first wife) took part in the 1827 Georgia Lottery. He appears to have placed his children in charge of properties he owned in McMinn County, Tennessee and in Bradley County, Tennessee. Levi relocated to Georgia, where he appears on the 1830 Census for Lee County, Georgia. A woman Caroline’s age is in his household. I believe that Caroline is that woman, and that she accompanied Levi to Georgia to help him become established. She disappears after that census record, so I believe that she died between 1830 and 1840. This theory would explain Caroline’s disappearance from South Carolina or Tennessee records and her reappearance in Georgia. Levi Spencer died after July 1, 1844 in Bartow, Cass County, Georgia.

This article has been updated. Click here for the update!

To Be Continued in Part Three

References

(1) 1790 Census about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) 1800 Census about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(4) “Spencer Research of Barbara Inman Beall: Generations 1-6”. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Sellers, Hazel Crowson, “Old South Carolina Churches”, (1941)
(6) Townsend, Leah. South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). Originally Published Florence, South Carolina 1935
(7) John Dunkin Estate File, FHC film 24,145; SLC 2/19/94; from reference in “Newberry Co. SC Equity Records 1818-1844”) Equity 1837: Package 6 (Box 22)
(8) Beall, Barbara Inman, “John Spencer (1750-1801),” Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches (In Process). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) 1800 Census about Levi Spencer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Early North Carolina and Tennessee Land Records about Levi Spencer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) Georgia Land Lottery, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) 1790 Census about John Spencer (erroneously listed by the census taker as John Spence). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14) 1780 Tax Records about John Spencer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Jun 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part One: Setting the Stage

Scene from Perry County, Tennessee--Photo taken May 2005

Scene from Perry County, Tennessee–Photo taken May 2005

So–just who was Elisha Spence?”

This question has plagued me more than once over the years. Elisha Spence was my fourth great-grandfather!

A younger son of William and Judah Spence, Elisha became inflicted with wandering–a condition I commonly label “The Itchy Foot Syndrome”. I have yet to discover his middle name. Elisha may well have been his second name. If so, his first name is unknown. He also appears to have used a nickname Li or Lisha on numerous occasions, depending upon the user. His parents both named him for Elisha McBride (the Spence family) and Elisha Hunter (the Perry/Hunter Family). If so, his full name may have been Elisha McBride Spence or Elisha Hunter Spence. Because Judah’s mother was a Hunter, I tend to favor the second suggestion.

Born in Pasquotank, North Carolina in approximately 1776, Elisha Spence was nine years old when his father died. His mother married William’s brother, David Spence, shortly thereafter. David’s property joined William’s, and so the two families were closely aligned. David had two sons by his first wife: Lewis Spence (1775-1811) and John David Spence (1776-1830)–both of whom would later appear on early Tennessee records with Elisha.(1) After David and Judah’s marriage in 1785, Elisha acquired two additional brothers, both of whom would also relocate to Davidson County, Tennessee: David Spence (1786-1814) and William Spence (1787-1873).(2)

For the next five years, the blended families resided in what was then called Camden County, North Carolina. Another brother, James Spence (1730-1804), was the sole executor of William’s estate but by 1787 after William’s estate settled and closed, James and his family moved to Randolph County, North Carolina.(3) Elisha may have traveled back and forth between Camden County and Randolph, spending time with both families. One of James Spence’s sons, Robert Spence (1767-1825) and Elisha became close friends. A century later, one of Robert’s lines would reconnect with several of Elisha’s lines in Missouri.

Yes, Elisha Spence was a wanderer!

David Spence last appears on the 1790 Census for Camden County, North Carolina.(4) He died sometime between that census record and the end of the year. In 1790 or 1791, Judah remarried again, this time to David Jones (1735-1795)–a son of Capt. Nehemiah Jones (1718-1775), grandson of John Jones (1675-1723), and great-grandson of John Jones (1650-1708). And this is where the Jones story takes an interesting twist beginning with the great-grandfather.

John Jones was born in Wales in 1650, and he died in Pasquotank, North Carolina before January 20, 1708. As noted in a previous article concerning the Jones connection with the Spence line, John had two marriages. His first wife’s name is unknown, but they had a son: Evan Jones (1670-1709). John’s first wife died in childbirth and between 1673 and 1675, John married Elizabeth. Their son, John, was born in 1675 in Albemarle, Virginia. Their other two sons were Isaac Jones (1684-1734) and James Jones (1685-1734). John, b. 1675, was the father of Nehemiah and grandfather of David. The target of interest here is Evan Jones (1670-1709), who arrived in Virginia in 1692.(5) Evan and Nehemiah were half-brothers.

In 1696, Evan married Margaret Sharpe (1670-1747) in Virginia. They had at least one son: James Jones, who was born May 2, 1698 in King George, Virginia. Evan appears to have traveled back and forth between Virginia and England, so he may have been in the merchant business. He died in April 1709 in Stafford County, Virginia. The records become clearer about his son James.

James was born in 1724 in Albemarle, Virginia. He married Frances Mason (1727-1790) on January 8, 1747 in Overwharton Parish, Albemarle, Virginia.(6) Their children were:

1. Jane Jones (1740-1834)
2. Mason Jones (1748-1820)
3. Hannah Jones, b. 1750
4. John Jones (1750-1841)–he would later settle in Giles County, Tennessee
5. Samuel Jones, b. 1752
6. William Jones, b. 1756
7. Mary Jones, b. 1758
8. Sarah Jones b. 1760
9. DANIEL JONES (1767-1815)

Daniel Jones is important to the narrative here. His son, Lewis Jones (1795-1849) would later marry Elisha Spence’s daughter, Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) in Davidson County, Tennessee. And there is another important connection here. Nehemiah Jones’s wife died in childbirth with David Jones (1735-1795)–Judah Perry Spence’s third husband. Nehemiah may have remarried shortly after his wife’s death, and David lived with him at least until 1747 and after his cousin James Jones’ marriage to Frances Mason. David returned to Pasquotank later and served in his father’s militia company, but he retained a close bond with the James Jones children. In later years, he was able to return the favor.

As noted in the earlier article, David relocated to Chowan, North Carolina in 1758, where he appears on tax records.(7) That area became Gates County in 1779. His first wife was Sarah Ellegood (1737-1790), whom he married in Northampton County, Virginia August 24, 1758. Their children were:

1. Pheraba Jones (1763-1838)
2. James Jones (1769-1796)
3. Hezekiah Jones (1768-1827)
4. David Jones (1770-1806)

Daniel Jones was born in 1767 in North Carolina, only his father passed away in Virginia in 1771. David Jones and his wife Sarah Ellegood took young Daniel into their household. He was raised with their children.

By 1787, young Daniel married Sarah “Sallie” Bassett (1779-1837) in Wilkes County, North Carolina. Their children were:

1. John Jones (1788-1817)–He would later become the administrator of the David Spence estate in Davidson County, Tennessee. David (1786-1814) was the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Judah Perry Spence (1748-1795).
2. Lewis Jones (1795-1849)–He would later marry Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875), a daughter of Elisha Spence.
3. Ollie Bassett Jones (1797-1873)
4. James B. Jones (1797-1870)
5. Nancy Jones (1801-1879)
6. Elizabeth Jones, b. 1808.

The Daniel Jones family remained in North Carolina until approximately 1800 when they moved to Davidson County, Tennessee. David Jones (1770-1806)–the son of David Jones, Sr. (1735-1795) and Judah Perry Spence (1748-1795)–and Jonathan Jones (1785-1847)–the son of Hezekiah Jones (1768-1827) and Nancy Ann Carter (1766-1848) and the grandson of David Jones, Sr. (1735-1795) and Sarah Ellegood (1737-1790)–joined the Daniel Jones family in Davidson County, Tennessee between 1800 and 1804.

While his close siblings remained in the Pasquotank/Camden area, Elisha Spence chose differently. He traveled between Pasquotank and Camden Counties (Spence, Greaves, and related families), Randolph County (the James Spence family), Guilford County (a large Bell family from whom his second wife descended), and Gates and Chowan Counties (the Perry, Hunter and Jones families). By 1795, he traveled to Greenville County, South Carolina, where he encountered the Spencer and Toney families, and where he met and married his first wife!

To Be Continued in Part Two

References

(1) Early Records of Davidson County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Early Records of Davidson County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) Stuckey, Erma, Darnall, Spence, Steers, Spangler, Stuckey, Sill and brief accounts of families into which some members married Henry, Illinois: M & D Printing Company (1983).
(4) 1790 Census for Camden County, North Carolina about David Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 29 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s to 1900s. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 30 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Virginia Marriages, 1660-1800, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 30 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) North Carolina Census and Tax Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 30 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

The Life and Times of William Edward Spence (1722-1785)–Part Six

pasquotank_river

David Jones was introduced in an earlier section of this six-part article. The son of Capt. Nehemiah Jones (1718-1775), David was born in Pasquotank County, North Carolina in 1735. His mother’s name is unknown. She probably died in childbirth. I have no information that Nehemiah ever remarried. In all likelihood, David was raised by other family members. He may have been raised by the Spences since David Jones and William Spence were close friends. David was also well-acquainted with the Perry and Hunter families.

In 1754, David was still a resident of Pasquotank County (1), but by 1758 he had relocated to Chowan County, North Carolina (2). That portion of Chowan County would become Gates County by 1779. On August 24, 1759, David married Sarah Ellegood (1737-1790) in Northampton County, Virginia (3). The couple settled in Pasquotank, North Carolina, where they appear on various records. In 1766, David Jones appears as a Sergeant in Capt. Nehemiah Jones’s Militia Company along with William Spence (4). In 1769, David Jones appears as a resident of Pasquotank County on various tax records there (5). At this point, I haven’t determined whether he actually fought in the Revolutionary War since a number of men named David Jones from North Carolina appear on records. In 1786, David and his family returned to Gates County (6). His friend, William Spence, had died the previous year. William’s widow Judha married David Spence by Summer 1785.

The children of David and Sarah Ellegood Jones follow:

1. Pheraba Jones (1763-1838). Pheraba was born in 1763 in Pasquotank County, and she died September 14, 1838 in Bedford County, Tennessee. On December 20, 1784, she married William Pallan (1758-1818) in Granville County, North Carolina (7). They had one son: George Washington Pallan (1795-1860). I do not know whether they had additional children.
2. James Jones (1765-1796). James was born in 1765 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died about 1796 in Gates County, North Carolina. James’ wife’s name is unknown. Their children were Hannah, Joseph and Mary Jones. I know nothing else about them.
3. Hezekiah Jones (1768-1827). Hezekiah was born in 1768 in Pasquotank County, and he died in 1827 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. On May 26, 1784, Hezekiah married Nancy Ann Carter in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. Their children were: Abraham, David, Dempsey, Elizabeth, James, John, and Polly about whom I know nothing. Children with actual birth and death dates follow: (a) William Jones (1792-1833); (b) Jonathan Jones, born 1796; (c) Eli Jones, born 1799; (d) Jesse Jones, born 1805; James Jones, born 1807. I have no additional information.
4. David Jones (1775-1806). David was born in 1775 in Pasquotank County, and he died in 1806 in Davidson County, Tennessee. In 1790, he appears on census records for Gates County, North Carolina (8). David will return later in the Nashville, Tennessee articles.

Sarah Ellegood Jones and David Spence (Judha Perry Spence’s second husband) died about the same time in 1790. Judha Perry Spence, a widow again, left Pasquotank and went to Gates County where some of her Perry and Hunter relatives lived. She married David Jones shortly after her arrival in Gates. They had two daughters:

1. Judha Jones, born about 1791 in Gates County, North Carolina. I know nothing else about her.
2. Esther Jones, born about 1795 in Gates County, North Carolina. I know nothing else about her. In all likelihood, her mother Judha died while giving birth to her.

David Jones died in 1795 in Gates County, North Carolina apparently after his wife since he makes no mention of her in his will. An abstract of his will follows:

1795 JONES, DAVID, Hezekiah, James, David, Pheraba, Judith and Esther (9)

Thus ends the six part saga on the life and times of William Edward Spence. It took me longer posting it than previously anticipated, but I had to update my records as I worked through it. The next article will be a spin-off from this series about another Jones family connected with these people. I need to introduce them before continuing with Elisha Spence.

References

(1) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) Virginia Marriage Records (1700-1850). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) Three Hundred Years Along The Pasquotank: A Biographical History of Camden County (1957)
(5) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) North Carolina Marriage Records, 1741-2004 about Pheraba Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) 1790 Census about David Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) North Carolina Will Abstracts about David Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com